Robins in the garden

Todays Prompt: Robin

How could I not post and share with a prompt like this

Here is a female Eastern Yellow Robin.

The male Eastern Yellow Robins are a bit more colourful

The little Rose Robins are a treat to see

And for something completely different a Robin Gordon Grevillea

All chopped – despite the helpers

The Weekly Prompts Weekend Challenge: Chop

These chooks were no help when chopping wood. As soon as they heard me at the chopping block, they would appear hoping for white ants, which were fed to them readily. They really like the white grubs that burrow into the wood sometimes called Witchetty Grubs, a larvae of a Ghost Moth or Giant Wood Moth. They are a delicacy mostly eaten raw but when cooked “it is said the roasted grubs taste like a cross between chicken and prawns. The flesh will firm up with cooking, but the inside retains a soft texture much like an uncooked egg yolk.”
*From Gardening Know How

After I had an accident and hurt my back, I took my firewood blocks down the road to my mates place. He had a hydraulic block splitter. It took less than an hour to split a ute load which probably would have taken me a day at least.

And the Winner is…….
Earlier this month the Grafton Show was on. It was a bit wet and muddy but I managed to get over to the wood chop event to an Australian champion compete. He didn’t win his heat but this bloke did.

5 Minutes ago – 14 May

Hammad’s Weekend Sky #63

So glad to have Weekend Sky back after an April break Hammad. I didn’t take any Saturday morning photos from the usual spot as they would have all looked much like these. I have had quite a wet few months and this morning was no exception. The sky is grey and I am not sure why the photos have a sepia look about them. All my weekend sky photos are untouched with post photo editing, apart from naming and now resizing.

The usual looking east photo

And looking north. The sun will soon be rising to the right hand side of the photo

Todays bonus photo is a Pied Currawong who came to sticky-beak at what I was doing, from the tree in the bottom right of the first photo, and about to make a fast getaway.

Your sky song for Saturday

I have some lines for you

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Straight Lines

Birds on a wire

Bollards in the street

Down the tracks

Looking through the blinds

A window or more likely an air vent

My shed wall

Shutters on the Ponte Vecchio, Florence

One of the earliest songs I learnt to play on guitar

A bit on the side

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Side of Things

A White-faced Heron on the hunt

The Black-necked Stork takes a stroll

A little Thornbill gets all fluffy after a bath

An Eastern Spinebill hovers to extract nectar from a Grevillea flower

A Pied Cormorant in Silhouette

Appearing

Terri’s Sunday Stills: #Emerging from…?

An emerging or a beginning?

Emerging from the night, a sunrise is a good start

Let’s begin with the flowers. A Grevillea starting to open

I think this is a Dahlia

A pink Hibiscus

Frangipanni flowers

A lovely Rose

Now for a bit of nature, some not as pretty as flowers. Willie Wagtail chicks not long out of the shell and eyes aren’t open yet.

Welcome Swallow Chicks are always hungry and ready as Mum flies in

I love seeing the Joeys when they start to hesitantly pop their heads from their Mums pouch

Wide eyed they survey their world and keep an eye on the bloke with a camera although Mum doesn’t care all that much

A rare moment finding a Cicada emerging from its shell

My favourite emerging photo

and an emerging moonrise is a goodnight

In one door, out the next….almost

John’s Cellpic Sunday

This is where I do an explanation of my phone photo from my Last on the Card post.

On Thursday afternoon I heard and saw a group of Kookaburras chasing each other around the garden. I suspect the parents were trying to send an offspring out of their patch to start life somewhere else.

Suddenly there was a loud banging and crashing in my house. I went to investigate and found a Kookaburra in the loungeroom next to the back door. There was a small hole in the screen door and I slowly slid the door across and the Kookaburra flew out. Once outside there was a loud cackling of all the Kookaburras in the trees.

Here is the back screen door and the beak shaped hole

I wondered about the hole as it was small and the wire was bent outwards. After a while I went to go out of the front door and this is what I found.

The wire on the screen is not soft nylon it is metal wire, not as hard as the rear screen door but hard enough. I was amazed that the Kookaburra wasn’t badly injured.

*Kookaburra in the featured image for reference only. Not the actual Kookaburra