Don’t get too close

Sunday Stills: What is That #Aroma

If you happen to come across a Stinkhorn Fungus, Aseroe rubra, at first you may not notice anything strange. Then perhaps there could be some flies buzzing about. They are the fungi pollinators.

A Stinkhorn or Starfish fungi, starts out like an egg shaped thing which is the fruit emerging from the ground and then gradually opens up. After it bursts its way through the ground, the fruiting body also oozes out a gelatinous goop known as gleba, which contains the Stinkhorn’s spores. Apparently the gleba smells like the dead, rotting flesh of animals or dung. These smelly mucus mass are full of spores at the base of their arms.

Instead of a music video here is one of the Stinkhorn Fungi opening in time lapse plus a bit of history

Cee’s FOTD

Robins in the garden

Todays Prompt: Robin

How could I not post and share with a prompt like this

Here is a female Eastern Yellow Robin.

The male Eastern Yellow Robins are a bit more colourful

The little Rose Robins are a treat to see

And for something completely different a Robin Gordon Grevillea

5 Minutes ago – 14 May

Hammad’s Weekend Sky #63

So glad to have Weekend Sky back after an April break Hammad. I didn’t take any Saturday morning photos from the usual spot as they would have all looked much like these. I have had quite a wet few months and this morning was no exception. The sky is grey and I am not sure why the photos have a sepia look about them. All my weekend sky photos are untouched with post photo editing, apart from naming and now resizing.

The usual looking east photo

And looking north. The sun will soon be rising to the right hand side of the photo

Todays bonus photo is a Pied Currawong who came to sticky-beak at what I was doing, from the tree in the bottom right of the first photo, and about to make a fast getaway.

Your sky song for Saturday

White flowers in black and white

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Flowers

Paperbark flowers

Native Gardenia flower

Eucalypt flower

Native flower – perhaps a Scrambling Lily

Crocus