The Brown Honeyeaters – A Spring Story

During Spring, the Brown Honeyeater decided that a Lilli Pilli in a pot near the verandah at my besties house was a great place to build a nest. It gave me an opportunity to have a sneak peek into the life of Brown Honeyeaters.

Sitting on the verandah, having a cup of tea, we noticed a small bird flying in and out of the Lilli Pilli tree in a pot near the verandah. I had to go and see what was going on. I found the start of the nest construction. They must have been doing it for a few days before we saw the goings on. Both the female and the male were building the nest.
181214_brown honeyeater_nest_construction1
A few days later the nest was taking shape.181214_brown honeyeater_nest_construction2
All manner of vegetation –  grass, bark, lichen and spiders web was used. 181214_brown honeyeater_nest_construction3

This is the location of the nest.
181214_brown honeyeater_nest_construction8_location

Looks like I was spotted!
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Off she goes to gather more materials.181214_brown honeyeater_nest_construction5_flying
Every now and then she would wiggle about in the nest to get the shape right.181214_brown honeyeater_nest_construction6_testing
She was in there for a long time this day. I think she was laying an egg.181214_brown honeyeater_nest_construction7_egg_laying

Yes! I was right, an egg is in the nest. It is so small. Probably about a thumb nail size.
181214_brown honeyeater_nest_egg_one
A few days later another egg appeared.181214_brown honeyeater_nest_egg_two

It didn’t take long for some chicks to make an appearance. I missed out getting any photos when they were small pink chicks. A rather nasty storm was coming so my bestie dragged the pot onto the verandah. Luckily she did as the wind blew hard, the rain poured down and there was a bit of hail.
181214_brown honeyeater_nest_chick_two

Now comes the hard work for the parents. Both the female and the male were constantly flying back and forth with food for their babies.
181214_brown honeyeater_nest_feeding_bug

Ooops….looks like I was spotted again.
181214_brown honeyeater_nest_feeding_spotted

Chick one gets a morsel.
181214_brown honeyeater_nest_feeding1
and then chick two.181214_brown honeyeater_nest_feeding2
Part of being a parent is cleaning up after your children. This is the removal of what I call a poo sac. This keeps the nest clean and stops insects, mainly ants, getting into the nest.
181214_brown honeyeater_nest_poo_sac

They are getting bigger. When I approached, they would flatten themselves against the sides of the nest.
181214_brown honeyeater_nest_chick_two_older

After a busy day looking after the chicks, it’s good to have a bath and relax.
181214_brown honeyeater_nest_bird_bath

Unfortunately I missed out on the chicks leaving the nest. It didn’t take long from eggs to flying little birds.

I think I am lucky to be part of the Brown Honeyeaters life. They have all gone from my besties garden now. Off on their migratory path to a new place for Summer and I hope they come back next year. We are going to leave the nest in place to see what may happen.

Gulls

The word prompt from city sonnet: Gulls

The Gulls flew while the Cormorants just bobbed about hunting fish
terns_cormorants_seagulls01_brunswick heads_named_feb 2014

Soaring majestically in the sky
sea eagle_gulls_named_brooms head_jan 2015

Or hurriedly leaving the beach in a tangle of wings
yamba_200710_gulls tern flight_crop

Or just standing at the waters edge enjoying the sand between the toes.
seagull02_ballina_named_feb 2014

Finding a shady spot on the beach on a warm day
umbrella_seagull_named_broken head_april 2015
Looking nonchalant
seagull01_close_ballina_named_feb 2014

Or being cheeky
171017_blog challenge_bird_gull

Enjoying the morning sun
seagull_sunrise_named_ballina_feb-2017

Or a surprise Gull – an Australian Gull Butterfly
australian gull butterfly_named_home_feb 2015

Sweet

The Daily Post word prompt: Sweet

What could be sweeter than an Eastern Yellow Robin sitting on a garden chair looking for an insect in the garden
180215_sweet_yellow robin

Perhaps a Red-browed Firetail Finch having a bath on a hot day
180215_sweet_red browed firetail finch

Or a Variegated Wren contemplating having a dip
180215_sweet_varigated wren

Or a Grey Fantail splashing about
180215_sweet_grey fantail

Or is it a tiny Brown Thornbill enjoying a splash around
180215_sweet_thornbill

Did you have a Sweet favourite?

Meet Kurrie

I’d like you to meet Kurrie. Kurrie has been living at my besties place for a few weeks now. Luckily Kurries parents are always close by and are very good parents. Kurrie has survived 2 hail storms plus countless rain events as well as hot sunny days. We are enjoying Kurries company and will be sad when Kurrie finally decides it’s time to leave.

Here is a small photo story of our new friend Kurrie

Kurrie lives high in the tree tops not far from the house. Kurries place looks a bit thrown together but as I mentioned has survived the weather. You can just see one of Kurries parents on the right.
currie_the nest_up high

Here is a bit of a closer look at Kurries place. We were never sure that there was anyone in the nest.
currie_the nest

Then one day we could hear this raucous sound and there was Kurrie.
currie_the nest_just a beak

Kurrie spend a lot of time asking Mum and Dad for something to eat.
currie_asking for food_with mum

I wonder what the parent is thinking.
currie_asking for food

As Kurrie is growing, now it’s standing up and stretching.
currie_standing on the edge

All the time keeping an eye out for the next snack
currie_standing on the edge_inside

Or stretching out as far as you can
currie_leaning out

The parents are constantly bringing Kurrie food. A growing baby needs lots of nourishment.
currie_asking for food_again

Here, Kurrie gets a bit of food from the parent.
currie_getting food

A bit about Kurrie.

Kurrie is a Pied Currawong. Currawongs live in most coastal areas of Eastern Australia. They live in the forest and have adapted to city life. I know when the weather is getting cooler in the mountains as the Currawongs come down from the mountains to hang around my place. They are around 48cm. Currawongs have a loud and distinctive call which is heard in the mornings, before roosting at night and sometimes before it rains.

Here is their call from Graeme Chapmans website
http://www.graemechapman.com.au/library/sounds.php?c=101&p=349