The Screen Door – A Shed Project

The screen door is a reclaimed part of my childhood. No longer used in the family home it made its way here. The screen door was used on the first “house” I built. It made the journey to this house, albeit with a few dodgy repairs, and was on the front door until it started to show signs of wear.
Relegated to a shed and neglected. I was always going to fix that screen door up one day. Years passed and the lack of a good work space where things could get started and a place where the job could sit if it needed time for repairs to set.

The screen door made its way to the shed in a very sorry state
screen door03_shed_project_named_home_jackadgery_oct-nov 2019
Some of the timber surrounds that held the screen wire in place were missingscreen door01_shed_project_named_home_jackadgery_oct-nov 2019
and some were broken and all of them were unusable. The hinges were quite rustyscreen door02_shed_project_named_home_jackadgery_oct-nov 2019
I remember the oval enamel house number in the centre of the door. I don’t know where that went unfortunately. The handle is beyond repair too as I like that one. I think my Dad made it.screen door04_shed_project_named_home_jackadgery_oct-nov 2019
Into the shed and onto the trestles. Time to take off the timber surrounds, hinges, handle and remnants of the old screen wirescreen door05_shed_project_named_home_jackadgery_oct-nov 2019
A good sanding but not back to the original wood. I left a lot of the old paint and roughness as I didn’t want to erase all of the doors history. And a re-glue of the frame and clamping to make it sturdy once more.screen door06_shed_project_named_home_jackadgery_oct-nov 2019
All tidied up and a few coats of paint. screen door07_shed_project_named_home_jackadgery_oct-nov 2019

Now to attach the screen wire. Just used staples as the new timber surrounds will hold the wire in place.
screen door08_shed_project_named_home_jackadgery_oct-nov 2019

What I didn’t do was to take photos of the cutting of the timber surrounds and that part of the process to hold the wire in place.

Here is the door put installed this morning after a bit of getting everything ready yesterday afternoonscreen door09_shed_project_named_home_jackadgery_oct-nov 2019
The door behind the screen door was the front door of my childhood home as well.screen door10_shed_project_named_home_jackadgery_oct-nov 2019

Fire – my story

Debbies One Word Sunday: Fire

What a topic to pick Debbie!!! This is so much my life at the moment and has been for over four week. I have already posted some stories of the fires that surround me at the moment.
Some days the smoke is so thick, I cannot see more that 30 meters. Those days are spent inside. My chest is starting to hurt, my eyes are constantly sore and yesterday I had a sore throat.
The heat of the day doesn’t help either. One day last week it was 40C which isn’t usual for this time of year. Most days last week were in the low to high 30’s. The high daily temperatures combined with strong winds that seem to turn up most days makes for uncomfortable living.
Over the past two years the amount of rainfall has been a quarter of what I usually have here. This big dry has also exacerbated conditions. When there is a lack of rain, the eucalypt trees drop leaves and branches as a survival technique. The forest floor has a lot of leaves and dead wood. Normally that isn’t a problem as the high rainfall helps break down the vegetation into humus which is full of microscopic life as well as insects and worms.
The ground is dry under the leaves and is being baked by the hot sun. The UV rating today was extreme.
Together with my neighbours, we worked with the Rural Fire Service (RFS) to have a hazard reduction burn on our properties this Winter to prepare for Summer as the RFS thought that there would be a dangerous fire season this year. This Winter wasn’t the time to burn as we didn’t have many cool days and conditions weren’t right as assessed by the RFS.
The fire season is usually late November to March. The first fire to threaten our small community of properties happened early October. This post is a quick story of that Fire
An earlier fire story the month before but didn’t really affect my place.
The fires continued to burn this fire in early November started more concern for me and my property and has been continually burning since then.
Every afternoon when the westerly wind blows up I am scanning the skies for signs of smoke and as the day darkens I am  on watch in case embers are blowing ahead of the fire. The fire is about 15kms away.
I have my car packed with things I want to save and other stuff is handy to grab if the call comes through to evacuate.
I do live in the bush, or forest for my overseas readers/friends, I am aware of the potential hazards. Because it has been so dry my dam I use to water the garden hasn’t filled and there is a small amount of water that I am saving in case I need it to put out small fires.
My garden only gets small amounts of water to keep some of it alive. The Bangalow palms whose fronds shade the house and keep it cool in Summer are either dead or dying. Of the 10 or so in the gardens around the house, two are still alive. The small Lilli Pilli trees are dying, other Australian native plants are struggling. Every bit of water gets recycled and used to keep plants alive.
The sky has been so eerie and the days don’t have shadows or sunlight, just a orange glow.
The only thing to release me from this awful situation is rain. So far these fires statewide have burnt over one million hectares, only 4 deaths so far thank goodness, over 350 homes burnt and thousands of out-building burnt. I have friends who have lost their homes.
As I write at 6pm Sunday, I am watching the trees sway about in the wind dropping more leaves. There has been rain in the area, mainly to the south and north, but so far not here.
I am hoping……
PS   Don’t worry about me I am safe and prepared. I have been here for quite a while and have been through many fires before. I used to be the local RFS Deputy Captain and have a good knowledge of fire behaviour on my property and neighbouring properties.

 

 

 

Waiting

The Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #72: Waiting

What was that that flashed past the kitchen window? A flash of white. Quick………grab the camera and outside into the garden.

Yes……it’s a Caper White Butterfly coming to feed on the Pentas flowers.

Get set……..focus…….wait for that butterfly in flight photo opportunity…..wait and wait
191117_blog_challenge_waiting_caper white butterfly1
It’s a flutter of wings……….will she fly this time…….or just reposition to get more nectar 191117_blog_challenge_waiting_caper white butterfly2
Don’t get distracted……….ohhh look……..a dragonfly191117_blog_challenge_waiting_dragonfly
Oh bugger…….she’s off this bunch of flowers…….where will she settle next?191117_blog_challenge_waiting_caper white butterfly3
Look…….over there……quick get focused as she is fluttering her wings again….maybe this time she will fly191117_blog_challenge_waiting_caper white butterfly4
Hurrah…….success…..it did take a bit of time waiting191117_blog_challenge_waiting_caper white butterfly5

The Architect

The Ragtag Daily Prompt Thursday: Architect

This world has many examples of great architecture designed by some of the most inventive and clever people. But not all of the best architects are people! Come and meet one such architect. One who builds from an aged design that has stood the test of time. A place to raise a family. A place that, unlike some of mankinds, is  eco-friendly, is made from all natural materials gathered without the use of hands and transported by mouth. Combined with a bit of “spit” and placed in an exacting way to create a tiny wonder.

Who could create a structure like this?
191115_blog_challenge_architect_wasp_nest1

Look here she comes now, placing her mud in just the right place
191115_blog_challenge_architect_wasp_nest2

Making sure it is in place and secure
191115_blog_challenge_architect_wasp_nest3
Then inspect the interior  smoothing out an lumps or bumps191115_blog_challenge_architect_wasp_nest4

Isn’t she one of the best architects?
The Australian Hornet is one of the group known as potter wasps. They are a solitary insect and feed on flower nectar – pollinator – and hunt caterpillars – good for your garden – which quite often end up in the mud house for their larvae to feed on once they hatch. The caterpillars and other grubs are not killed but are comatose and the Hornets larvae consume them live.
They rarely attack people and are not aggressive just big and scary until you get to know them.

Stopping for a drink

I have always had bird baths place around my garden. There are big ones, shallow ones and small ones that the birds come to every day for a drink or a quick splash. I also have a number of containers on the ground and tucked into spots in the garden for the animals that may like a drink, mainly small animals. I fill containers daily in this long drought I am currently experiencing.

One such container is on the garden seat where Satin Bowerbirds like to get a drink. Yesterday I was in the kitchen and looked out of the window and to my surprise a Red-necked Wallaby was having a drink. Wallabies normally drink from the dam. I have never seen a Wallaby drink from the containers in the garden before. She must have been thirsty.

red-necked wallaby_female_drinking_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019
He mate was keeping watch nearbyred-necked wallaby_male_watching_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019

You may wonder about the weird colour in the photos. The smoke from the nearby bushfires is quite thick and the sunshine is quite coloured.  Shadows are muted. As you can see there eucalypt trees have dropped their leaves to try and save themselves in this  drought. The Sun certainly highlights the dead leaves. A lot of these leaves are on the road which have been raked away from buildings. The bush where I live is very dry. The only thing that will stop these fires is rain.

I am keeping safe and watchful. The Rural Fire Service is doing a great job keeping everyone safe.

Also for LMP – Photo Adventure – Animals

 

This is October 2019

Oh my aren’t I tardy with the October wrap up? Lots of things have been happening – see some of the posts over the past week. I shan’t dwell on the most horrible situation I find myself in right now. I guess you have seen all about the fires in Australia, The north coast of NSW is where I live and the fires have been burning since early October.

I can’t really think straight as I haven’t slept well for a while now. Luckily and the end of October to early November my bestie and I had a brief holiday in Tasmania. I hadn’t been before so it was all new. Breathing air that wasn’t smoke laden was a blessing as was cool temperatures and even a bit of rain. That will be a post of its own later when I get around to it.

OK there isn’t all that many photos compared to previous “This is” posts but still grab a snack and a drink of your choice so you can stroll through my world in October.

I haven’t posted many photos of the Red-necked Wallabies that hang around my garden for a while. This little Joey has fun speeding around.
red necked wallaby_garden_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

His Mum was keeping watch. Check out those lovely lashes.
red-necked wallaby_named_home_jackadgery_pct 2019
I was out on a walk with my bestie and a friend when we came across some Eastern Grey Kangaroos resting in the shade. There was a female, a Joey and a male. When the male stood up we stopped and waited to see what they would do. Thankfully they group hopped over the fence in one bound and into the next paddock. When he stood up to his full height, he was about 2 meters tall. Look at those chest and arm muscles!! eastern grey kangaroo_male_named_caniaba_oct 2019
I may be in drought but every evening the frogs start up, not as many as usual. I love these tiny Eastern Dwarf Tree Frogs. Here he is again in a previous post that has the call as well.eastern dwarf green tree frog_garden_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Meet Bob, one of the funniest fish I have ever seen. He would swim away and then appear from the side of the tank, look at you and swim away. The Seahorse World where he lives is at Beauty Point in Tasmania.fish_bob_named_aquarium_tasmania_oct 2019
A regular sight around the north coast are Black-shouldered Kites hovering over a field waiting for snack to make a move then drop like a stone.black-shouldered kite_hover_named_caniaba_oct 2019
Here is one some of the European readers will know. The European Goldfinch was introduced into SE Australia and Tasmania in the 1850’s.european goldfinch_named_tasmania_oct 2019
A Forest Kingfisher waits patiently on the power lines in the late afternoon for his meal to move in the paddock below.forest kingfisher_powerline_named_caniaba_oct 2019
The little hanging pot bird bath is too small for the King Parrot but its good for drinking. The Hippeastrums will come later.king parrot_hippeastrum_garden_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
One very unseasonably hot day, the temperature reached 38C IN SPRING!!! Here is a young King Parrot and a Spangled Drongo discussing the day, “hot enough for ya”king_parrot_spangled_drongo_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Down at the waterhole on 3rd after a good fall of rain. Lovely to see a bit of water. The last rain since.waterhole_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

Going up into the mountains for a bit of a walk and see new places. The players of the mountains from my favourite spot, the Raspberry Lookout.
raspberry_lookout_smoke_layers_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
Another place near Washpool, (which is now on fire) The smoke is from the fires to the north in early October.lookout_smoke_layers_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
I love finding a leaf that has been skeletised (OK I made up that word according to spellcheck)leaf_skeleton_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
The new Spring flush of leaves on a Eucalypt.leaves_eucalypt_new_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
The Casuarina and the blue of the distant hills. My bestie reckons it is like a Japanese print.she-oak_tree_named_gibraltar_range_nov 2019
One of the new crops on the north coast is dryland rice.rice_named_springgrove_oct 2019
Back at the waterhole on my place. The ferns in shelter spots are growing well. This is called a Five Fingered Jack or a Rough Maidenhair Fern.fern_five_finger_jack_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

While in the Gibraltar Ranges in Spring I was hoping to find some native flowers. Here is a Blue Dampiera.
flower_native_blue dampiera_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

Tiny False Lilac flowers
flower_native_false lilac_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

A Hairy Bush Pea with a Native Stingless Bee
flower_native_hairy bush pea_raspberry_bee_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

Don’t the little Small Leaved Boronia look ever so sweet.
flower_native_small leaved boronia_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

There were lots of White Paper Daisies along the road sides.
flower_native_white paper daisy_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

The flowers of a Flapjack Succulent
flower_succulent_pancake_named_caniaba_garden_oct 2019

The first time this plant from my old mate Geoffs place has flowered and I can’t remember what it is
crinum_flower_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
My besties Foxgloves flowered well this yearflower_foxglove_named_caniaba_garden_oct 2019
The start of my Hippeastrums hippeastrum_flower_spear_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
More have started to bud uphippeastrum_flower_buds_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Once the flowers arrive, so do the Native Stingless Beesstingless native bees_hippeastrum_red_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Look at the amount of pollen in the flowers. The Native Stingless Bees get coated in pollenstingless native bees_hippiastrum_pollen_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
An olden Hibiscus at my besties attracts a bee or is it a wasp?flower_hibiscus_bee_named_caniaba_oct 2019
Casting a fine web, this spider waits underneath for lunch to drop in.spider_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
OK all is done. I had to include a photo of our Sun late in the afternoon on a fire day. A mixture of clouds and smoke.sun_fire_sky_smoke_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

I hope you enjoyed a stroll through my October. Did you have a favourite photo? I love to hear what you think so please drop me a line. I guess I need conversation

also for Su’s Changing Seasons

The Green Tree Snakes visit

I had a week and a bit of a holiday in Tasmania. I came home to find my resident Green Tree Snake had decided to shed its skin while I was away. The Lilli Pilli in the garden is having a bit of a hard time surviving the very dry conditions which has made it quite handy for a snake to divest itself of last years skin.

Green Tree Snakes are quite harmless. A little slender snake about two meters long. Their fangs are located at the back of the mouth so you have to be partially swallowed before a Green Tree Snake can inject a venom which is harmless to humans but not so to the small prey, lizards, frogs, eggs etc. They are diurnal and have large eyes. They are not always green either. Known to be olive-green to black and the flecks of blue can make a Green Tree Snake look blue. They are mostly yellow on the throat and belly but also other pale colours as well.

The early morning sunrise also helped in the making of this blog.

The wrapping around the branches. Start at the head and peel away.green_tree_snake_skin_full_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019

The belly and tail
green_tree_snake_skin2_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019
Aren’t the patterns in the scales lovely.green_tree_snake_skin1_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019
The head end showing the large eyes and lower jaw.green_tree_snake_skin_head_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019
The sunrise made an ordinary Green Tree Snakes skin look amazing.green_tree_snake_skin3_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019

I have used an old photo of a Green Tree Snake in the featured photo.