I have some lines for you

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Straight Lines

Birds on a wire

Bollards in the street

Down the tracks

Looking through the blinds

A window or more likely an air vent

My shed wall

Shutters on the Ponte Vecchio, Florence

One of the earliest songs I learnt to play on guitar

Lines and shadows

Friendly Friday Challenge: Leading Lines
Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #198: Light and Shadow

Why put both challenges together? I found a lot of my photos have both elements. Some of these may be placed into one or the other but some a well into both challenges.

I think I will go with a theme within the challenge themes. I haven’t mentioned leading lines in the descriptions but I am sure you will pick those photos among the light and shadow ones.

Starting with sunsets which make great light and shadows

Staying with artificial light play and shadows

and just some sunlight used in different ways. For indoors

and outside

A bit on the side

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Side of Things

A White-faced Heron on the hunt

The Black-necked Stork takes a stroll

A little Thornbill gets all fluffy after a bath

An Eastern Spinebill hovers to extract nectar from a Grevillea flower

A Pied Cormorant in Silhouette

Getting up close in the garden

Cee’s Mid-week madness Challenge May: Close up or Macro

I have been trying to get on top of my photos, naming, categorising and putting into folders. I never ending job which I let get out of control.

For this months CMMC, I have these photos from 23 March 2020 that I found while sorting today. Only one has been used before but I didn’t care as I really like it. Can you guess which one?

A blue native flower most likely Scurvy Weed

A pink Pentas from my garden

Caper White Butterfly also on a Pentas flower, this time a red variety

A cape Water Lily flower on my dam with a bonus insect either a fly or a bee

Life of a Blue Ginger

Following on in my flower and plant series “Life of…..” Today is the the Blue Ginger flowers turn.

I have quite a number of Blue Ginger plants in the garden and some are in pots. Not an Australian native plant as I was first told, this beautiful Brazilian perennial is commonly known as Blue Ginger (Dichorisandra thyrsiflora) It is a shade lover loves the morning sun and where I have planted some, they are protected from the afternoon sun

It is a perennial plant which grows from thick, rhizomatous roots. Though known colloquially as blue ginger, it is not related to ginger plants (Zingiberaceae). It belongs instead to the Commelinaceae family of plants.

Enough of the botanical stuff, let’s get on with a few photos from around my place.

I spent time looking for some plants that showed the whole plant and I did find some that I have posted before. This post includes older photos (the larger ones) and the ones taken in Autumn this year. They are smaller as I have to reduce the amount of size in my media folders, something I didn’t think o9f until I saw the WordPress changes for the future. Thanks to Cee for letting me know about resizing my photos.

This is one group of plants at my besties old place where I have some of the these cuttings now growing at my place.

These are some of my plants

I planted this group of Blue Gingers where they don’t get much sun at all so now the flowers are looking for some sunshine. These are well over two metres tall as the roof of my shade house you can see is at least two metres tall.

The stem are also interesting. The green band are where the leaves have dropped off

The beautiful clustered flower heads are vibrant purple-blue and appear atop of spiraled, ginger-like stems of leaves, which often have purplish undersides.

I like the purple colour of the stems that hold the leaves as well. Quite often you can find a bee or other insect in the flowers.

Here are a few Stingless Native Bees feeding on the pollen

The flowers do look inviting

Even when there are some water drops and you can see right inside

No wonder Blue-banded Bees love them

Teddy Bear Bees love them too

Just an arty shot I had to include

When the flowers start to fall, it is almost time for the rest of the plant to die back for Winter. I don’t usually cut the stems back after flowering. I let the stems die back putting their nutrients back into the rhizome for late or after winter when the shoots will appear.

The flowers gradually drop leaving the stem which too will drop.

Also for Cee’s FOTD