Leading lines

The Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #80: Leading Lines
Down the hallway180426_blog challenge_lines_hallway

To the windows
180614_blog challenge_columns_vertical lines_sagrada familia_barcelona

Follow the bicyclist
180614_blog challenge_columns_vertical lines_collonade_bologna
Down the road180414_blog challenge_which way_flowers rddown

Up and down the road
180331_blog challenge_which way_purgatory ck rd
On the train to nowhere191024_blog_challenge_square_line_railway_tracks (4)
Over the bridge170816_bandw challenge_structure_grafton bridge

Over the pond

190314_blog_challenge_which_way_toowoomba_japanese_garden_bridge
Japanese Gardens Toowoomba

Up the stairs181020_blog challenge_b&w_step_stairs_bologna
Down the stairswhich way_stairs and lights
Leading you along the beachblog_beach-art_stick-man

Which Way May 30 – Driving Home

Driving home for Which Way

I was driving home the other day and stopped at road works. I thought I would try and get some of the works in action. From there it has become part of my drive home from town, the last twenty kilometers or so. Sit back and enjoy the drive.
190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home1
Getting the job done190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home2
The water truck which is responsible, and the oncoming traffic, for the state of the windscreen190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home3
Looking back190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home4
The top of the hill and the straight stretch to the west and home190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home5
This part of the highway was reconstructed a few years ago. In the distance is Bakers Hill, a local name. The Baker family owned all the land both sides of the highway early last century. The geographical name is Mt Ramornie. It is not what people from overseas would call a mountain.190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home6
The road up Bakers Hill.190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home7

and down the other side
190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home8
Heading over the hill into the valley where my place is.190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home9

The last creek crossing, not far now.
190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home010
Onto the gravel road. It’s a bit rough as the road only gets graded and repaired once a year so make sure your dentures don’t fall out, tighten your bra straps and seat belt.190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home012
The last bit before turning into my road. It’s a bit narrow so I hope we don’t meet a logging truck, cattle carrier, gravel truck or any other big vehicle.190530_blog_challenge_which_way_driving_home013

Well that’s it. The rest of the photos were of the blobs of dirt on the windscreen and into the sun. My blog header gets us in the gate.

Hope you enjoyed the ride home. Perhaps a tea or coffee and some cake or it could be wine time and snacks.

The late Alvin Lee and Ten Years After blowing away the folk at Woodstock

Which Way May 9 On the way to Coaldale

It’s time for a Which Way

My daughter lives on the other side of the Clarence River from my place so it’s a enjoyable drive to go and see her. Come for a drive with me to Coaldale.
Some of the roads are long and straight
190509_blog_challenge_which_way_coaldale1

 

190509_blog_challenge_which_way_coaldale2

 

190509_blog_challenge_which_way_coaldale3
There are a few twists and turns190509_blog_challenge_which_way_coaldale4

 

190509_blog_challenge_which_way_coaldale5
and some roads go past a pub190509_blog_challenge_which_way_coaldale6

Enjoy this live version. It’s OK to get up and boogie

Lunch on the side of the road

I was driving along the Summerland Way heading to see my bestie, when I spotted a large shape ahead on the side of the road. I instantly knew what it was, slowed and parked the car. Turning the engine, music, lights off I wound down the window, grabbed my camera and hoped that I get some photos of the Wedged-tailed Eagle, the largest bird of prey in Australia, having lunch.

This is what I saw. WARNING It does contain some grisly photos.

The first quick photo just in case he flew off once he spotted me stopped. He did see me but I tried to be as still as I could and hoped he was very hungry and would continue eating the Red-necked Wallaby who was most probably road kill.
wedged-tailed eagle_wallaby_eating_named_dilkoon1_march 2019

Then it was back to having his lunch – actually it was late afternoon
wedged-tailed eagle_wallaby_eating_named_dilkoon2_march 2019

Another look up to see if I had moved
wedged-tailed eagle_wallaby_eating_named_dilkoon3_march 2019

Ripping off a piece of meat from the Red-necked Wallaby, he just tossed it down. Now you can see the talons, about the size of your hand
wedged-tailed eagle_wallaby_eating_named_dilkoon4_march 2019

More to eat while still keeping an eye on me
wedged-tailed eagle_wallaby_eating_named_dilkoon5_march 2019

Now where to have a nibble. Aren’t those fluffy pants adorable?
wedged-tailed eagle_wallaby_eating_named_dilkoon6_march 2019
Suddenly some small birds flew into a nearby tree. Probably seeing me, they started making their warning calls. This distracted him from the meal and he looked around at the bush behind just in case the threat came from that direction.wedged-tailed eagle_wallaby_eating_named_dilkoon7_march 2019

As the other birds kept their racket up, he decided it was time to go. As he unfurled the 2 meter plus wings he was gone. Unfortunately I was unable to get the lift-off as he flew into the bit of bush behind.
wedged-tailed eagle_wallaby_eating_named_dilkoon8_march 2019

That was the end of my encounter. As I started the car and gave those small birds a glare, I noticed he had just flown a few meters into a tree but I was unable to stop again on the sometimes busy road.