Softness falls and touches

The Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #137: Soft

Here is your soft tune to scroll through some images from my island home

A soft landscape at sunset

A soft cityscape through a rainy window

A blue landscape filled with mist

Our Moon and clouds during the day

A soft feather like moss cascading over a log

Just a feather I found

The beautiful Water Snowflake lilies that grow on my dam

The softness of a butterfly atop a flower

A lot of S’s

The Lens-Artist Photo Challenge #136: Subjects Starting With the Letter – S

The Sun is rising so lets go with a lot of S’s to get through

Shoes

Spanish Steps in Rome

Street light in Toowoomba Australia

A Singing Currawong

Sea Eagle keeping watch

Shell on the Sand

Silver Gulls enjoying the surf

Striated Pardalote

Scaly-breasted Lorikeet enjoying a Snack

A Spangled Drongo looking Spangly

A Scarlet Jezebel Butterfly also having a Snack

Scarlet Honeyeater – a jewel in my garden

Soft Shelled Snail

A Skink about to make a Snack of a Soft Shelled Snail

Sunset

and of course the don’t look section

don’t bother going any further you lot

You were warned as per the mountains of comment I have had

Going to start now

This is a warning photo of what might be coming

Spiders Web

St Andrews Cross Spider

A natural insect control in my house, a Huntsman Spider

A harmless Green Tree Snake

See that wasn’t too bad was it. Here’s some flowers for recovery

I picked these

The Lens-Artists Challenge #125: You Pick It

This is an interesting challenge due to Tina’s opening inviting us into the challenge with “This week it’s all up to you – you get to choose your subject and to share whatever it is about it that you find interesting. Personally, I’ve chosen last week’s introduction to the concept of Wabi-Sabi, particularly as it relates to art and photography, as my topic.

Wabi-Sabi has me intrigued as my initial though was to just bung up a couple of flowers and say I picked these.

But no, I had to go down a bit of a Wabi-Sabi rabbit hole of discovery. This definition was quite good “Although Wabi-sabi can be hard to define, we can translate its simplified meaning to “rustic simplicity” or “understated elegance” with a focus on a less-is-more mentality, while “taking pleasure in the imperfect”.”

When looking for Wabi-Sabi perhaps “Wabi-sabi is a cracked and glued together ceramic bowl (check the concept of kintsugi); a funnily shaped, home-grown tomato; a dinner created from leftovers; falling cherry blossom; a worn wooden hallway and an elbow patch on your favourite jumper. Therefore, it’s an appreciation of all that is simple, modest and imperfect. Yet, loved deeply.”

So where to from here. Want to find out? Let’s have a go at my interpretation of Wabi-Sabi through a photographers eyes

I added this one for a bit of Zen fun

From the website – https://japanahome.com/journal/wabi-sabi-how-to-embrace-this-ancient-japanese-philosophy-at-home-and-life/

Wabi- sabi and Zen 

Wabi-Sabi’s roots lie in Zen Buddhism, which a Chinese twelfth century monk (Eisai) brought to Japan. Zen stresses austerity, communion with nature, and above all, reverence for everyday life as the real path to enlightenment. To reach enlightenment, Zen monks lived ascetic, often isolated lives, and sat for long periods of concentrated meditation.

In Zen philosophy, there are seven aesthetic principles in achieving Wabi-sabi:

Kanso — simplicity

Fukinsei — asymmetry or irregularity

Shibumi — beauty in the understated

Shizen — naturalness without pretension

Yugen — subtle grace

Datsuzoku — freeness

Seijaku — tranquility

wabi sabi tea ceremony

Thanks Tina for taking me to Japan and back for a while

Time to focus

The Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #121: Focus on the Subject

Patti has given some tips so maybe I should see how I go using these ideas for inspiration

Using Leading Lines & Repeating Patterns – “The lines and patterns help draw us into the scene and guide our eyes towards the subject.”

Using Selective Focus – This technique helps the viewer focus on the subject

Using Colour – “In this case, the colors help draw our eyes to the main subject of the image.”

Using Contrast & Focusing on the Eyes – “Contrasts in color, patterns, textures, old and new, fast and slow (for example) can help guide our viewers to focus on the subject.”

Freezing the Action – “Our eyes are drawn to action and speed.”

Framing the Shot with Arches, Doorways, etc. – “A final technique to draw attention to our subject is to use doorways, arches, tunnels, and windows to create a frame around it”

In my garden

This is a multi photo challenge post. Of course it features birds in my garden for Lisa’s Bird Weekly Photo Challenge as well as Tina from the Len-Artists Challenge #120 – What a Treat
Also sneaking in a photo for Basil’s Life Captured Photo Prompt: Transitioning

All the following photos are taken in my garden either walking about or from the verandahs. My home is a treat for seeing birds, insects and animals as well as flowers. Here is a song to listen to as you take a stroll with me in my garden.

This is a King Parrot transitioning from juvenile to adult male

King Parrots can be cheeky. This one is looking through my office door to see what I am doing

Blue-faced Honeyeater and a Bottle Brush flower

The Little Friarbirds like the nectar from the grevillea flowers

Everyone loves a little Eastern Yellow Robin as they hop around the garden

There is always a surprise find in the garden. I think it may be a Lacewing hunting among the leaf litter

The Yellow-faced Honeyeaters chitter chatter in the garden

Dragonflies are always flitting about or just watching on a stick

Of course I could let a post about my garden go without including a Red-necked Wallaby and her Joey

So many butterflies in my garden throughout the year. Scarlet Jezebels arrive in September in time to take advantage of the Pentas flowers

Scarlet Honeyeaters are flashing jewels as they fly about seeking nectar from flowers like this Pink Euodia

The Orchard Swallowtail Butterflies are the largest butterflies in my garden

The Hippeastrums are flowering now and the tiny Stingless Native Bees just love them

Rainbow Lorikeets add so much colour to my graden