Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge – Starting with the letter K or L

Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge – Starting with the letter K or L

More Australian animals in black & white

Lizard – Bearded Dragon
191115_blog_challenge_blackandwhite_letterL_lizard_bearded dragon
Eastern Grey Kangaroo and her Joey191115_blog_challenge_blackandwhite_letterK_kangaroo
A fluffy eared Koala191115_blog_challenge_blackandwhite_letterK_koala

Stopping for a drink

I have always had bird baths place around my garden. There are big ones, shallow ones and small ones that the birds come to every day for a drink or a quick splash. I also have a number of containers on the ground and tucked into spots in the garden for the animals that may like a drink, mainly small animals. I fill containers daily in this long drought I am currently experiencing.

One such container is on the garden seat where Satin Bowerbirds like to get a drink. Yesterday I was in the kitchen and looked out of the window and to my surprise a Red-necked Wallaby was having a drink. Wallabies normally drink from the dam. I have never seen a Wallaby drink from the containers in the garden before. She must have been thirsty.

red-necked wallaby_female_drinking_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019
He mate was keeping watch nearbyred-necked wallaby_male_watching_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019

You may wonder about the weird colour in the photos. The smoke from the nearby bushfires is quite thick and the sunshine is quite coloured.  Shadows are muted. As you can see there eucalypt trees have dropped their leaves to try and save themselves in this  drought. The Sun certainly highlights the dead leaves. A lot of these leaves are on the road which have been raked away from buildings. The bush where I live is very dry. The only thing that will stop these fires is rain.

I am keeping safe and watchful. The Rural Fire Service is doing a great job keeping everyone safe.

Also for LMP – Photo Adventure – Animals

 

This is October 2019

Oh my aren’t I tardy with the October wrap up? Lots of things have been happening – see some of the posts over the past week. I shan’t dwell on the most horrible situation I find myself in right now. I guess you have seen all about the fires in Australia, The north coast of NSW is where I live and the fires have been burning since early October.

I can’t really think straight as I haven’t slept well for a while now. Luckily and the end of October to early November my bestie and I had a brief holiday in Tasmania. I hadn’t been before so it was all new. Breathing air that wasn’t smoke laden was a blessing as was cool temperatures and even a bit of rain. That will be a post of its own later when I get around to it.

OK there isn’t all that many photos compared to previous “This is” posts but still grab a snack and a drink of your choice so you can stroll through my world in October.

I haven’t posted many photos of the Red-necked Wallabies that hang around my garden for a while. This little Joey has fun speeding around.
red necked wallaby_garden_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

His Mum was keeping watch. Check out those lovely lashes.
red-necked wallaby_named_home_jackadgery_pct 2019
I was out on a walk with my bestie and a friend when we came across some Eastern Grey Kangaroos resting in the shade. There was a female, a Joey and a male. When the male stood up we stopped and waited to see what they would do. Thankfully they group hopped over the fence in one bound and into the next paddock. When he stood up to his full height, he was about 2 meters tall. Look at those chest and arm muscles!! eastern grey kangaroo_male_named_caniaba_oct 2019
I may be in drought but every evening the frogs start up, not as many as usual. I love these tiny Eastern Dwarf Tree Frogs. Here he is again in a previous post that has the call as well.eastern dwarf green tree frog_garden_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Meet Bob, one of the funniest fish I have ever seen. He would swim away and then appear from the side of the tank, look at you and swim away. The Seahorse World where he lives is at Beauty Point in Tasmania.fish_bob_named_aquarium_tasmania_oct 2019
A regular sight around the north coast are Black-shouldered Kites hovering over a field waiting for snack to make a move then drop like a stone.black-shouldered kite_hover_named_caniaba_oct 2019
Here is one some of the European readers will know. The European Goldfinch was introduced into SE Australia and Tasmania in the 1850’s.european goldfinch_named_tasmania_oct 2019
A Forest Kingfisher waits patiently on the power lines in the late afternoon for his meal to move in the paddock below.forest kingfisher_powerline_named_caniaba_oct 2019
The little hanging pot bird bath is too small for the King Parrot but its good for drinking. The Hippeastrums will come later.king parrot_hippeastrum_garden_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
One very unseasonably hot day, the temperature reached 38C IN SPRING!!! Here is a young King Parrot and a Spangled Drongo discussing the day, “hot enough for ya”king_parrot_spangled_drongo_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Down at the waterhole on 3rd after a good fall of rain. Lovely to see a bit of water. The last rain since.waterhole_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

Going up into the mountains for a bit of a walk and see new places. The players of the mountains from my favourite spot, the Raspberry Lookout.
raspberry_lookout_smoke_layers_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
Another place near Washpool, (which is now on fire) The smoke is from the fires to the north in early October.lookout_smoke_layers_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
I love finding a leaf that has been skeletised (OK I made up that word according to spellcheck)leaf_skeleton_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
The new Spring flush of leaves on a Eucalypt.leaves_eucalypt_new_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
The Casuarina and the blue of the distant hills. My bestie reckons it is like a Japanese print.she-oak_tree_named_gibraltar_range_nov 2019
One of the new crops on the north coast is dryland rice.rice_named_springgrove_oct 2019
Back at the waterhole on my place. The ferns in shelter spots are growing well. This is called a Five Fingered Jack or a Rough Maidenhair Fern.fern_five_finger_jack_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

While in the Gibraltar Ranges in Spring I was hoping to find some native flowers. Here is a Blue Dampiera.
flower_native_blue dampiera_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

Tiny False Lilac flowers
flower_native_false lilac_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

A Hairy Bush Pea with a Native Stingless Bee
flower_native_hairy bush pea_raspberry_bee_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

Don’t the little Small Leaved Boronia look ever so sweet.
flower_native_small leaved boronia_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

There were lots of White Paper Daisies along the road sides.
flower_native_white paper daisy_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

The flowers of a Flapjack Succulent
flower_succulent_pancake_named_caniaba_garden_oct 2019

The first time this plant from my old mate Geoffs place has flowered and I can’t remember what it is
crinum_flower_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
My besties Foxgloves flowered well this yearflower_foxglove_named_caniaba_garden_oct 2019
The start of my Hippeastrums hippeastrum_flower_spear_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
More have started to bud uphippeastrum_flower_buds_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Once the flowers arrive, so do the Native Stingless Beesstingless native bees_hippeastrum_red_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Look at the amount of pollen in the flowers. The Native Stingless Bees get coated in pollenstingless native bees_hippiastrum_pollen_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
An olden Hibiscus at my besties attracts a bee or is it a wasp?flower_hibiscus_bee_named_caniaba_oct 2019
Casting a fine web, this spider waits underneath for lunch to drop in.spider_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
OK all is done. I had to include a photo of our Sun late in the afternoon on a fire day. A mixture of clouds and smoke.sun_fire_sky_smoke_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

I hope you enjoyed a stroll through my October. Did you have a favourite photo? I love to hear what you think so please drop me a line. I guess I need conversation

also for Su’s Changing Seasons

The Green Tree Snakes visit

I had a week and a bit of a holiday in Tasmania. I came home to find my resident Green Tree Snake had decided to shed its skin while I was away. The Lilli Pilli in the garden is having a bit of a hard time surviving the very dry conditions which has made it quite handy for a snake to divest itself of last years skin.

Green Tree Snakes are quite harmless. A little slender snake about two meters long. Their fangs are located at the back of the mouth so you have to be partially swallowed before a Green Tree Snake can inject a venom which is harmless to humans but not so to the small prey, lizards, frogs, eggs etc. They are diurnal and have large eyes. They are not always green either. Known to be olive-green to black and the flecks of blue can make a Green Tree Snake look blue. They are mostly yellow on the throat and belly but also other pale colours as well.

The early morning sunrise also helped in the making of this blog.

The wrapping around the branches. Start at the head and peel away.green_tree_snake_skin_full_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019

The belly and tail
green_tree_snake_skin2_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019
Aren’t the patterns in the scales lovely.green_tree_snake_skin1_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019
The head end showing the large eyes and lower jaw.green_tree_snake_skin_head_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019
The sunrise made an ordinary Green Tree Snakes skin look amazing.green_tree_snake_skin3_named_home_jackadgery_nov 2019

I have used an old photo of a Green Tree Snake in the featured photo.

The first rescue this Spring

Some day can be different to others especially at this time of year. The other day when I was driving home I noticed a shape on the road and immediately knew what it was. I slowed down and luckily I knew there weren’t any vehicles behind me for quite a distance, I reversed along the road.

There on the road was a Long-necked Tortoise who was moving from the diminishing water in the creek to get to somewhere else, or maybe he was just a male out on the hunt for a female Long-necked Tortoise.

As this was a quick rescue, no time for photos, just grab a towel which I always have in the car for such an occasion.

“A towel is just about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can carry. Partly because it has great practical value. You can wrap it around you for warmth as you bound across the cold moons of Jaglan Beta; you can lie on it on the brilliant marble-sanded beaches of Santraginus V, inhaling the heady sea vapours; you can sleep under it beneath the stars which shine so redly on the desert world of Kakrafoon; use it to sail a miniraft down the slow heavy River Moth; wet it for use in hand-to-hand combat; wrap it around your head to ward off noxious fumes or avoid the gaze of the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal (a mind-bogglingly stupid animal, it assumes that if you can’t see it, it can’t see you — daft as a brush, but very very ravenous); you can wave your towel in emergencies as a distress signal, and of course you can dry yourself off with it if it still seems to be clean enough.”  From Hitchhikers fandom page

But I didn’t need my towel for intergalactic reasons. A towel is always handy when picking up and transporting a Long-necked Tortoise as their other defense mechanism beside retreating into their shell is the squirt a stinky bodily fluid and oh yes it is quite pungent. Once I had this fellow well wrapped and in the car, I headed home. Due to the drought conditions many of the waterways have stopped running and I didn’t know where there was a safe waterhole to put this bloke, so home it was. Earlier in the week I had seen another Long-necked Tortoise in the dam so maybe a bit of matchmaking?

I put him on the floor of my dam.
long-necked tortoise_rescue_dam_shell_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
and eventually he poked his head out when I moved him a bit closer to the waters edge.long-necked tortoise_rescue_emerge_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
He looked this way and that sniffing the airlong-necked tortoise_rescue_neck_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
He checked out the damlong-necked tortoise_rescue_face_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
and with a scurry and a splash he was gone.long-necked tortoise_rescue_dam_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

He really was a character   Then it was time for me to get back to the house and wash the stinky towel.