They are all naturally grey

Life in Colour November: Black/grey

Jude has asked “What Greys in nature do you have to share?” I think you may have sent a loaded question Jude

The front and the rear (not the best sorry) of a Grey Fantail and then onto a few more

Peaceful Dove – Grey Goshawk – Grey Crowned Babbler
Little Friarbird – Common Brushtail Possum – Black-faced Cuckoo Shrike
Koala – Grey-shrike Thrush Spotted Gum
Ibis Feathers Old tree – Granite Boulders –
Line-blue Butterfly – Crested Tern

This is September 2021

This was a dry month, following a dry August, a month of wanting rain to fill water tanks and dams which are so low – not enough to water gardens for the next few months. Last night the first good rainfall happened, 17mls in a storm which has made today a smiling day. The garden is happy. With a growth of grass around my house the Red-necked Wallabies have returned to graze which is a lovely sight to see.

I was quite amazed at the amount of flowers in the garden which bought in the birds. The butterflies are yet to arrive in numbers, there are a few small ones here and every now and then a bigger butterfly flits through the garden.

As you will see the warm weather has bought out many animals including a few reptiles. So let’s get into what I found in September.

One of my favourite September songs for you to scroll to

I put together the photos and thought that I would start with a sunrise. I don’t see much coloured sky living in the bush but sometimes the colours get above the trees. After looking back I now realise that this is really a sunset. Oh well the pastel colours above the blazing reds and oranges looked great.

Here is a lone butterfly photo drinking from a Lavender flower.

My bestie has started a new garden bed and is slowly adding soil, mulch, compost and plants. The Poppies are the best flowering for a while.

Remember last month when I was able to photograph the Gymea Lily that was still in bud? Well the flower was still around when I finally was able to get there after Covid lock downs. The flower is just starting to fade.

This is the first flowering of the Pink Trumpet Tree, an Australian rainforest tree, and now the tree is covered in flowers after a bit of a false start in August.

The Bottlebrush are also having the best flowering for years.

I thought that I had lost the Champagne Pink Bottlebrush but it was just slow to flower.

I love the grass seed heads and flowers, so do the bees.

and the Galahs do as well

The Blue-faced Honeyeaters have taken over the garden making sure that no one else gets into the various grevillea flowers. Always keeping watch as you have a snack, even upside down.

The Paperbark trees are flowering as well much to the delight of the Scarlet Honeyeaters.

The Satin Bowerbird was always in the garden as he set up the bower to attract the females. He didn’t scare off easily much to the vocal displeasure of the Blue-faced Honeyeaters.

Here is the contents of his bower. This is the fifth bower he has constructed in the garden carting most of his treasures from place to place. This site is one of the same places he used last year. What can you see?

Here’s a closer look. I have no idea where he collects his treasures from as none of the contents are from my place, except the snail shells possibly. I don’t know whose blue feathers they are either.

I love the Spangled Drongos shape outlined against the morning sky.

The Yellow-faced Honeyeaters mad a nest just outside of the sun room. The nest was well concealed and I had to wait until the babies were out of the nest to have a look at them.

There is always someone looking in the office window to see if I have any snacks. This is a female King Parrot and is Tiny’s mate.

and this is Tiny trying to get my attention.

We went for a drive and on the way home we stopped off at a wetland towards my besties place. In one part of the wetland, two Black-necked Storks were standing around. Here is a back and front photo of them, possibly a male and female.

On the other side some Australian Pelicans were settling down for the night.

Over the month sometimes the sky looked rather spectacular. I love clouds. These were at my place

These were at my besties

With the warm sunshine starting, the Water Dragons were around sunning themselves.

I had to chase this Goanna from the front of the house. I think he wanted to come inside.

A Carpet Snake was sunning himself on the warm gravel of the driveway until I came outside and he headed off. I think he spent most of the winter in the roof space of my house as I heard shuffling every now and then.

OK I know how much some of you have just sped by the reptiles so here is a bit of cute. A Red-necked Wallaby Joey just hanging in the garden, warming in the morning sun.

Even if you think you are a big boy, Mum always knows you need a good wash. Despite some protests, the face washing went on for a while.

One day we went to Ballina just to get out of the house after the Covid seven day lock down had finished. By the afternoon the sky looked ominous and the seas were quite rough.

It must have been a bumper season and the pink marshmallows are stacked and ready

OK it’s time to head off into the sunset. Thanks for stopping by. I hope you found a favourite or two.

Also for the Changing Seasons which I am co-hosting with Ju-Lyn. Here is Ju-Lyn’s Changing Seasons


Also for Cee’s Mid-week Madness Challenge September: Autumn or Spring
and Terri’s Sunday Stills: #Signs of…. Autumn? Spring?

This is February 2021

Hi there, I found February to be a weird month. It rained for thirteen days with heavy rain at the end of the month filling dams and water tanks for the coming Winter. The rest of the time it was hot and humid so I have limited a lot of photos and might use as separate posts later.

The good news is at the end of the month the doctors looked at my latest EEG, this time I was tested for three hours. Well by tested I mean sleep for two and three-quarters of the three hours of the testing. So after almost eight months of not being allowed to drive, I have my drivers licence back with the only condition that I am not allowed to drive between sunset and sunrise. I better have a swag in the back of the ute just in case I’m heading home late from shopping!!!

Anyway, on with the bits and pieces I found in February. I found The Lumineers from a free CD that comes with a music magazine I get. Have a listen while you scroll

It’s morning already. Through the lifting fog, the morning sun kisses the tops of the eucalypts across the valley

High in the dead branches an Old Mans Beard, Tillandsia usneoides which is from Florida but it doesn’t grow meters long like the ones in the swamps, sway in the gentle morning breeze

The farm next door to my besties usually leave the paddock next to her fence as a last minute fattening paddock. They open the gate and the cattle run in to savour the sweet grass or like the bull does, make sue that everyone knows that this is his place.

Meanwhile atop the hillock, a cow wonders what all the fuss is down below while snacking on the long juicy grass.

Willie Wagtails use anything for a vantage spot; not even a sleeping cow is shown any dignity!

One of the downsides of growing grass for cattle to eat is that a lot of small seed eaters come in to feed in the mornings and afternoons. Wrens, Finches, Cisticolas and Chestnut-breasted Mannikins. It’s lucky that there is a lot of grasses along the road verges and fence lines so there is plenty to eat for everyone.
This Chestnut-breasted Mannikin contemplates whether the seed head over there will be tastier than the one he’s sitting on.

The Willie Wagtail chicks are out of the nest but still as demanding as ever.

The Scaly-breasted Lorikeets come in for a breakfast of Mistletoe flowers and seeds. I love how they land on the branch on walk down head first, sampling food along the way. These Mistletoe hang down almost two meters from the tree branch. You can see the difference in the leaves. The Eucalypt on the right and Mistletoe on left, both have sickle leaf shapes.

In the garden, A Lewins Honeyeater and a Yellow Grevillea.

When out on a drive before I was allowed to, there was a Black Swan pair are setting up on a dam not far from my place. Now I can drive, I can go and see how they are going and hope they hung around. The property doesn’t have much vegetation and cattle. You can see the edge of the dam in the background.

While out on the drive, at the Raspberry Lookout while I was taking photos, a Wedged-tailed Eagle was watching me

After finding a safe spot to stop on a narrow road, I took the photo of the White-bellied Sea Eagle through the open car window. He was on the far side of the Nymboida River so I was amazed that I managed to get a photo on full telephoto without a tripod.

We went down to Ballina with some friends and on the entrance to the North Wall, a break-wall where the Richmond River meets the sea, on the Marine Rescues radio tower, an Osprey was having his lunch of fish. The young Osprey was sitting nearby and must have been fed as it was asleep.

Late afternoon, low light I came across a juvenile Black-necked Stork doing it’s stretches in preparation for take off from the intermittent wetlands on a farm, again not vegetation in or around the wetland. The next time I had to go to town, the Storks were gone so practice pays off.

While the youngster was flapping about, not far away one of the Black-necked Stork parents was keeping watch.

OK we are heading into the bugs. Nothing to be concerned about in this lot I can assure you. See, first off is the egg casing for Praying Mantis. I must go and try and find it to see if it’s still there.

This Dragonfly almost looks like a helicopter. Such beautiful markings and colours no wonder it is called an Australian Tiger.

A Blue Skimmer found his favourite stick. I was watching for a minute and noticed he would always come back to this stick after a bit of a fly around the river bank. Made for getting a good photo of his wings.

The Lemon Migrants have hung around my place and some are still here.

I have some old chook watering and feed bits and pieces I use when I want to give the birds a snack. I went down that way and noticed a weevil deciding he’d had enough grain for the moment and was off.

Another butterfly that has been around is a Common Albatross Butterfly. They are quite quick and don’t land for long.

The Blue-banded Bees are still hard at gathering pollen. This Salvia is a favourite. Blue-banded Bees are solitary bees and make their nest on the ground.

This year, the lovely pink flowers of the Crepe Myrtle looked stunning

The Cassia flowers are the main attraction for the Lemon Migrant Butterflies. I tried to get butterflies and flowers but the butterflies seem to disappear when the shutter button is pushed. Perhaps there is a lot of Lemon Migrants in there somewhere.

This Native Plant grows grows throughout the place. This is the first time one has grown in a garden bed.

The rain had sparked up the Hibiscus. The Miniature Red looks a treat covered in small red flowers…..

…..and there are many more on the way.

The red Salvia has so many flowers

Last month, the Ivory Curl flowers were just in the almost open stage. Now the Ivory Curl Bush is full of scented flowers and full of all manner if insects. Here a bee burrows down inside to get his pollen while the plant “paints” the bee with pollen from each of the tiny paint brushes.

Foxgloves, old and new, with water drops.

One of the weirdness of some Callistemon trees is the flowers come straight from the old growth branch. Here is a three stage of flower development in the one photo.

The tangerine flowers are stunning

The Champagne Pink Callistemon with yellow tips is so lovely.

The Roses are looking so good

I love the explosive effect you can get photographing Eucalypt flowers

A Lomandra flower and seed spear live up to their common name Spiky Club Rush, a waters edge plant that happily lives in garden and makes great borders.

Speaking of spiky, when out driving there always someone who says slow down, I’m sun-baking here mate. I had to get out of the car and almost touch the Bearded Dragon to get him to move off the road and find a safer spot to catch some rays.

I thought I would save the Yellow Paper Daisies so you could have a rest. I found these at the Raspberry Lookout. I had to clamber down the slope to get the photos. This is what I was concentrating on when the Wedge-tailed Eagle was watching me.

The rain and hot days have bought out some fungi. These dome shaped ones were found in a few places.

Some little ones were pushing from the soil and bark.

Instead of the usual sunset photo to finish off, here is a Green Tree Frog just sitting on the glass door. I guess hanging on with your chin helps.

Thanks for hanging around with me for a while. Hope you can come back next month too.

This post is linked to – Su’s Changing Seasons February 2021
Cee’s CMMC: Close up or Macro
Weekly Prompts Wednesday Challenge: Beautiful

This is November 2020

Ahhh….November. A mix of wanting to get out and take a few photos, don’t go as it’s getting rather hot out there, look isn’t that interesting and a bit of general ambivalence.

This months song may not be for everyone. A really good 70’s band, Pavlov’s Dog had some wonderful music but the singer, David Surkamp’s voice wasn’t for everyone. I hope you give the song a chance as you scroll around bushboys world.

There was a small amount of rain during November but the last week was not to very hot. It was 41C on the verandah a couple of days ago and it’s been in the high 30’s. Those brief showers bought out this frog, a Tylers Tree Frog, who was on the back door getting out of the rain or maybe getting snacks from the insects attracted to the lights inside the house.

The bird bath at my besties has a work out too. There was a number of Brown Honeyeaters swooping around and having fun

A Mistletoe Bird in the early morning light which brightened it’s red breast.

A female Rufus Whistler was singing out for her mate.

He wasn’t far away and was singing back. They have a wonderful song that resonates through the bush.

A Scarlet Honeyeater found the Bottlebrush flowers

and the Honey Gem Grevillea. Not long after I took this photo, a Noisy Friarbird who thinks they own that part of the garden swooped in frightening the little Scarlet Honeyeater off.

No the Spangled Drongo isn’t broken!! One hot day a Spangled Drongo decided to have a dip in the old pool and hang out to dry.

This is what a Spangled Drongo looks like when it feels a bit regal.

Tiny, the resident King Parrot, sat on the old Tree Fern trunk in the garden as I was going outside doing a number of poses.

This mad Little Friarbird sat on the window sill outside of my office window for ages just squawking and carrying on. I eventually gave up and went elsewhere to escape the constant noise.

These purple flowers haven’t opened yet and this is a large bud I guess

The Cactus in the pot flowered and flowered for most of the month.

I love the colour of this rose

A little creeper slowly trying to get a foothold. Hope the hot weather doesn’t set it back. The flower is about 5mm across

Here is a big part of the garden I don’t show often. This is an Elkhorn Fern. The fronds can get to 90cm or about 36 inches. It is an epiphyte. I attached a small piece to the tree around twenty years ago. It has endured some hardships but now looks great. Around 1 meter in height and girth and still growing. From this one there are quite a number of small plants growing around the garden and into the bush.

A delicate native pea flower. Again a tiny flower almost 10mm in diameter

The Billy Bonkers Grevillea has been flowering non-stop even through Winter. Each of those red striped parts of the flower is about the size of a match head.

I went over to the dam in the afternoon perhaps to capture a photo like the one with the little frog in the flower. I didn’t know at the time that I managed to get a spider, this time on the flower stalk.

The Flame Tree’s leaves are a favourite for a caterpillar or other leaf chewing insect.

This is a new Native Bee to add to my list of Australian Native Bees. I discovered this one, a Gold-tipped Leafcutter Bee, at my besties place

I snuck up on the Orchard Swallowtail Butterfly while it was busy with it’s head inside of the Agapanthus flower.

I haven’t seen the wallabies around the house much over Winter. After the fires the vegetation growth has been amazing so they have lots of feed elsewhere. Do you remember the Joey and Mum I was feeding after the fires? Here she is with the little one almost grown and too big to get into the pouch any more.

I just love this Holden Ute. These were the first cars built in Australia in the late 1940’s early 50’s, the Holden FX and FJ Models. My elder brother owned a FJ sedan of the same model as this one

Thanks for stopping by and having a look through my world in November. Did you have a favourite photo?

Also for Su’s Changing Seasons

Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge – Starting with the letter K or L

Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge – Starting with the letter K or L

More Australian animals in black & white

Lizard – Bearded Dragon
191115_blog_challenge_blackandwhite_letterL_lizard_bearded dragon
Eastern Grey Kangaroo and her Joey191115_blog_challenge_blackandwhite_letterK_kangaroo
A fluffy eared Koala191115_blog_challenge_blackandwhite_letterK_koala

Unique

The word prompt from the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge 51: Unique

I think I’ll stick to the uniqueness of around here.

Native Stingless Bee with a Jumping Ant looking onnative bee_close3_murraya paniculata flowers_home feb 2012

One of the many small Australian Native flowers that grow here
native flower_purple_named_home_august 2017
A Rainbow Lorikeet in a Pink Euodia171206_blog challenge_letter p_parrot_rainbow lorikeets
Purple Fringe Lily170927_blog challenge_square sept_purple fring lily
Hyacinth Orchid that just pops up in the bush around the house170928_blog challenge_square in september_hyacinth orchid
Red-necked Wallaby and her Joeyred necked wallaby_joey1_home_feb 2012
Blue-banded Bee inĀ  Blue Ginger flower180327_before and after_blue banded bee_blue ginger
Koalakoala1_close_looking_binna burra__with border_nov 2011
Native Sarsaparilla or Wisteria among Fringe Wattle flowerswisteria-native_wattle_named_home_aug-2016
Native Gardenia flower170929_blog challenge_square sept_native gardenia
Blue Triangle Butterflyblue triangle butterfly_side_named_binna burra_jan 2018