This is February 2019

February didn’t see me taking many photos. I was feeling rather uninspired and a bit flat. A lot of things were happening and I think that a lack of rainfall was one of the reasons I didn’t get out and about finding new and wonderful things to share.

So this month it isn’t a case of getting a cuppa or snacks. I won’t take up too much of your time so scroll on folks

Perhaps this shopping cart sums up my month.
shopping_cart_smashed_lismore_feb 2019

With the heat and lack of rain, the fire crews were doing their best to make sure everyone was safe. From my besties place near the airport, the fire crews and the spotting helicopter flew out every morning.
helicopter_fire_caniaba_feb 2019

An angel of the sky, the Sky Crane does wonders in helping the ground crews put out the fires. We watched as it flew out in the mornings and back in late evening.
helicopter_fire_crane_caniaba_feb 2019
Enough of the gloom. Here’s a Koala climbing a tree. It looks like he has Koala shorts on too.koala_tree_climbing_caniaba_feb 2019

The ever present Australian Raven finding a snack in the garden outside the Art Gallery
australian raven_lismore_feb 2019

I had to include the inquisitive Pacific Heron who was frog hunting on my dam.
190223_blog_challenge_six_word_saturday_pacific_heron

The Bar-shouldered Dove doesn’t look all that impressed with the White-throated Honeyeaters sharing the bird bath
bar-shouldered dove_white-throated honeyeaters_bird_bath_garden_caniaba_feb 2019

Up close a Bar-shouldered Dove looks quite pretty even if the wind is ruffling feathers.
bar-shouldered dove_close_bird_bath_garden_caniaba_feb 2019

Every morning and evening, the Ibis fly over the house either to feeding grounds or to their roosts.
ibis_flying_caniaba_feb 2019

A Silver Gull takes a walk along the beach
gull_beach_evans head_feb 2019

There is nothing better that laying under the shade of a Pandanus Tree on a hot day at the beach.
pandanus_under_evans head_feb 2019

Remember the little Sand Crab. Well here he is again
sand_crab_hole1_evans_head_named_feb 2019

The little Blue-banded Bees are buzzing around the garden checking out the Pentas flowers.
blue banded bee_garden_pentas_home_jackadgery_feb 2019
Despite the hot dry weather, the butterflies are returning to the garden. The Orchard Butterflies enjoy the Pentas too.orchard swallowtail_butterfly_pentas_garden_home_jackadgery_feb 2019
At night, the outside Velvet Geckos hang around getting their snacks from the insects hanging around the light that spills from the house onto the verandahs.gecko_window_named_home_jackadgery_feb 2018

The Full Moon reflecting on the water with a rare rain shower at night.
moonlight_water_rain_caniaba_feb 2019

I wonder if the mural or the lock on the door came first.
lock_hands_lismore_feb 2019
OK the sun is setting and here you are at the end already.sunset_yellow_orange_caniaba_feb 2019

I hope you found a favourite

Bath Time

The word prompt from Bren for the Photo for the Week 27: Time

I love the bird baths that are at my besties place and here at mine. Some birds opt for a quick dip while others just love to splash about.

It’s time for bath time

The first few are from the bird baths at my besties old place. This one in particular was near the verandah so it gave me plenty of opportunities for bird bath photos.
Some birds, like this Eastern Yellow Robin, just enjoyed a splash around
171018_blog challenge_letter I_birdbath01

A Magpie getting right in
magpie1_in birdbath6_binna burra_24042011

I think this was a Whipbird really splashing about
171018_blog challenge_letter I_birdbath07
The Noisy Miners loved to get wet
171018_blog challenge_letter I_birdbath04

Sometimes it is just good to sit and soak like the little Thornbill
180425_blog challenge_partake_bird bath_buff rumped thornbill
The Eastern Whipbird jumped right inwhipbird01_in birdbath_named_binna burra_sept 2017

A Red-browed Firetail Finch made sure the water went in everywhere
red-browed-finch_birdbath_named_binna-burra_dec-2016

Onto a few photos from my place. It is a pity that possums managed to smash my lovely terracotta bird bath while trying to get a drink even though they had lots of ground level watering places around the garden.
The White-throated Treecreeper enjoyed a good butt soak
171018_blog challenge_letter I_birdbath05
A female Satin Bowerbird liked to sit and thinksatin bowerbird_female_bird bath_splash_named_home_july 2018

As did a Rainbow Lorikeet
rainbow lorikeet_in bird bath_named_home_oct 2017

The little hanging pot is a favourite for small birds
scarlet-honeyeater_female_birdbath_named_home_dec-2016

Really getting a splash on
bowerbird_splash_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

A quick in and out for a White-throated Honeyeater
lewins honeyeater_bird bath_splash_named_home_march 2016

Quite often it was mixed bathing. The Eastern Yellow Robin and Silvereyes shared a quick dip
silvereyes_eastern yellow robin_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

Often the Rainbow Lorikeets came in numbers which often ended up in squabbles
rainbow lorikeets04_bird bath_home_named_oct 2014

Hope you enjoyed Bath Time

Threesome at the bird bath

The word prompt for Ragtag Daily Prompt Saturday: Three
A Yellow-faced Honeyeater, Eastern Spinebill and a Red-browed Firetail
190106_blog_challenge_three_bird_bath1

Red-browed Firetail and a couple of Silvereyes
190106_blog_challenge_three_bird_bath2
Yellow-faced Honeyeaters and a White-browed Treecreeper190106_blog_challenge_three_bird_bath3

Yellow-faced Honeyeaters and a White-throated Honeyeater
yellow faced honeyeaters_white throated honeyeater_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018
Yellow-faced Honeyeatersyellow faced honeyeaters_birdbath_named_home_may 2018
A Scarlet Honeyeater and Silvereyes having a drinksilvereyes_scarlet honeyeater_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018
Rainbow Lorikeets170425_mystery_rainbow lorikeets

Red-browed Firetails
red browed finch03_three_binna burra_named_dec 2013

This is December 2018

First of all, thanks to everyone who has been part of my life this year. I have enjoyed sharing my part of this world with you. Your comments and feedback has been quite overwhelming at times. I take photos because I enjoy the results I achieve. I have a basic Canon PowerShot SX60HS which takes great macros, amazing telephotos and does everything I could ask, except focus where I want sometimes. Even then the capture can be a photo that goes into my Arty Ones folder. Some of those are posted in a recent photo challenge – Abstract.

On to December. This month was taken up in part with Becky’s great square format photo challenge #timesquare The featured image is one of the photos from Beckys challenge. Sometime last year I made a suggestion for the challenge which I cannot remember.

I have tried to cut down the number of photos but again it may be a bit of long read, so a drink, perhaps a snack may be in order. All settled back and ready. Join me in looking at This is December 2018
Sunrise is always a good place to start
sunrise_yellow_named_caniaba_dec 2018
The wind blew the grass seed headsgrass_seed_head_named_caniaba_dec 2018

One morning, the tiny Line-blue Butterflies were all over the grass area while we were having breakfast. They loved the clover flowers.
butterfly_line-blue_clover_flower_garden__named_caniaba_dec 2018

A Blue-banded Bee made a morning ritual of visiting the Chinese Lantern flowers. I never was ready to get that photo.
flower_chinese_lantern_pot_named_caniaba_dec 2018

A delicate flowering plant we were told was called Herb Robert. A lovely flower and bud.
flower_herb_robert_pot_named_caniaba_dec 2018
A Mistletoe Bird was a visitor for a few daysmistletoe bird_branches_named_caniaba_dec 2018

After the demise of the terracotta bird bath, a tempory replacement was found. A Rainbow Lorikeet looks unsure.
rainbow lorikeet_bird bath_new_named_home_dec 2018

Since the hatching of the Brown Honeyeaters, they have stayed around the garden. This is one of their favourite sitting places in the morning.
brown honeyeater_branches_named_caniaba_dec 2018

Luckily one of the Grevilleas is flowering for them.
brown honeyeater_grevillea_white_flower_garden_named_caniaba_dec 2018

I love it when you can see our Moon during the day.
moon_day_named_home_dec 2018

Many people call Dandelions weeds. The flowers add a great splash of colour in the garden.
flower_dandelion_garden_named_caniaba_dec 2018

The Bees love the flowers too. Look at how much pollen has been gathered into the bees pollen sacs.
bee_dandelion_flower_garden_named_caniaba_dec 2018

I think it is wonderful.
bee_dandelion_flower_named_caniaba_dec 2018

A Pumpkin display at the markets. So many varieties to choose from.
pumpkins_named_lismore_farmers_market_dec 2018

This van belongs to one of the market stall holders at The Channon markets. I would love this van.
bus_named_the channon_dec 2018
Now Summer is here and it is hot and dry, the birds have to share the bird bath.willie wagtail_brown honeyeaters__bird bath_garden_named_caniaba_dec 2018

Coming in for a landing
white throated honeyeater_landing_bird bath_named_caniaba_dec 2018

“I made it safely….so what are you looking at?”
white-throated_honeyeater_bird bath_named_caniaba_dec 2018
The Brown Honeyeaters. An adult and one of the young ones. Always look up to your elders.brown honeyeaters_adult_child_bird bath_named_caniaba_dec 2018

This is my bird bath the Magpie Lark (or better known as Pee Wee) is telling everyone.
magpie lark_bird bath_garden_named_caniaba_dec 2018

A spot of grub hunting has paid off.
magpie lark_grub_garden_named_caniaba_dec 2018

The Cape Chestnut Tree at The Channon Market was in full bloom.
flower_cape chestnut_named_the channon_dec 2018

Now for a couple of native flowers I found at my daughters place. I looked in my books to try and identify so I could tell you their names, but wasn’t successful. I will have to ask an ecologist who said I could send him photos and he would try to tell me their names. Isn’t this one pretty?
flower_pink_native_named_coaldale_dec 2018
Like the above flower, most native flowers are quite small. The one above was about 10 to 15mm from petal tip to petal tip. This little flower is about 5mmsflower_pink_small_native_named_coaldale_dec 2018

Another tiny flower with an amazing structure
flower_yellow_native_named_coaldale_dec 2018

Such a delicate ball of even smaller flowers. Each ball is around 10-15mm in diameter.
flower_white_ball_native_named_coaldale_dec 2018
The Stingless Native Bees just love the native flowers. The flower seems huge compared to the beebee_stingless_native_flower_named_coaldale_dec 2018
The start of Summer. The Frangipanni flowers around the garden are stating to emerge.frangipanni_pink_named_home_dec 2018

I love the soft pink and yellow of this Frangipanni flower which has a heavenly fragrance.
flower_frangipanni_yellow_named_home_dec 2018

The pinks and yellows of this one are much more stronger.
flower_frangipanni_pink_named_home_dec 2018

The Pink Frangipanni is stunning.
flower_dark pink_frangipanni_garden_named_home_dec 2018

This Poinciana tree I see on the way home was the best I have seen.
flower_poinsianna_tree_named_waterview heights_dec 2018
The tiny flowers of one of the Tea Trees I have in my garden is waiting for the bees.flower_tea tree_garden_named_home_dec 2018
This year, my Agapanthus flowers were the best flowering ever. All through the garden was spots of white and blueflower_agapanthus_garden_named_home_dec 2018
One of the blues.flower_agapanthus_blue_garden_named_home_dec 2018

The tree Begonia decided to have another flowering this December.
flower_begonia_tree_garden_named_home_dec 2018

I have a number of Datura Erecta plants around the garden. The berries looked lovely one morning. I think they may be poisonous as nothing seem to eat them.
berries_duranta_garden_named_home_dec 2018

If anyone would, it would be a Fig Bird, seen here keeping an eye on me as I walked about.
figbird_peeping_named_caniaba_dec 2018

The King Parrots are starting to want some food as a couple of people who fed them in the street have since moved on. I give them a small amount of wild bird mix occasionally. Actually I hadn’t been home for a couple of days and this bloke came to the verandah and whistled to get my attention
king parrot_verandah_named_home_dec 2018

A migratory visitor to my place are Leaden Flycatchers, This female was scouting the verandah for a snack. Yes a photo taken while I was inside at my desk.
leaden flycatcher_female_named_home_dec 2018
One afternoon as I drove through the front gates, a Forest Kingfisher swooped in front of me and sat in the tree, almost like a welcome home.forest_kingfisher_tree_named_home_dec 2018
The Australian Air force is saying goodbye to the fleet of Orions. One of the planes is going to an Air Museum at Evans Head. It flew into Lismore. This was taken from my besties backyard.
orion_aeroplane_named+caniaba_dec 2018

The old swimming pool, which is now a frog pond of sorts, is host to so many water insects and frogs. One of the frog species in the pool is the Perons Tree Frog. I think this may be one just emerging from tadpole to frog.
frog_perons tree_pool_named_home_dec 2018

I am unsure who these beastly looking gang are. Hopefully are dragonflies.
insects_stack_pool_named_home_dec 2018

Christmas is always a wonderful time in December. I wasn’t in a Christmas mood this year. My bestie had some decorations at her place. An op-shop angel and some lights looked great.
lights_statue_christmas_named_caniaba_dec 2018

An Australian Lilli Pilli tree in the corner with some little lights mad the room look bright.
lights_tree_christmasl_named_caniaba_dec 2018

The Full Moon, just before Christmas Day was big and bright.
moon_full_ponytail_palm_named_caniaba_dec 2018

One of the photo challenges was Abstract – see the opening words – I didn’t include this Moon photo as I thought it was rather special and needed to be in my monthly wrap-up post.
moon_full_reflection_pool_named_caniaba_dec 2018

I didn’t have my tripod so just had to have a go hand held. At least one turned out OK lol
moon_full_named_caniaba_dec 2018

Summer arrives and the plants start to thrive so along come the Grasshoppers to have a snack. This one likes Basil….or used to.
grasshopper_basil_garden_named_caniaba_dec 2018

Another little Grasshopper from my daughters place. Her garden hasn’t been attacked yet.
grasshopper__named_coaldale_dec 2018

The Ponytail Palm has so many flowers, the bees don’t know where to begin. I walked outside and the buzzing was quite loud I looked up and the flower spikes were full of bees.
bee_ponytail_palm_flower_named_caniaba_dec 2018

The Blue-banded bee I couldn’t get in the Chinese Lantern Flower didn’t escape my attention as it buzzed about the Basil flowers.
blue-banded_bee_basil_garden_named_caniaba_dec 2018

The Hover Fly loved the garden too
hover_fly_rosemary_named_caniaba_dec 2018

The Palm Trees, the water and the ripples
reflection_palms_named_caniaba_dec 2018
Late afternoon looking from my besties verandah across the paddocksscene_trees_subdued_named_caniaba_dec 2018

The December sun is almost set.
sunset_orange_close_named_caniaba_dec 2018
Goodbye December and 2018.sunset_orange_named_caniaba_dec 2018

Thanks for being a part of my world. I hope to see you again in 2019.

171019_blog challenge_glow_fireworks

A Few Birds

Joining in with Kate and here theme: Birds

This particular post is in memorium to the terracotta bird bath that has given so much pleasure over the years. Over the weekend, possibly during a wild storm on Saturday, the terracotta bird bath plummeted to the ground and breaking into many many pieces. The bird bath had survived other falls but not this time unfortunately.

The Waterhole

The word prompt from Amanda at Life Amazing: Pools or Ponds

I have been meaning to post a bit about my property for a while. One day it will be whole post. For the moment, thanks to Amanda, here is a bit about the waterhole or pool on my place. It always has water and I have never seen it dry. I went for a bit of a bush walk a few weeks ago, before the rains came, just to see how the environment and and birds and animals had been coping with a lack of rain.

This is how the waterhole or pool looks when there has been a bit of rain.
181010_blog challenge_pool_pond_durranbah_waterhole_water

This is what I found. A small pool behind some gravel and leaves.
181010_blog challenge_pool_pond_durranbah_waterhole_dry

To my surprise, the waterhole was filled with the sounds of birds. This is the only water source down this part of my place so the birds were there in numbers. A tiny Scarlet Honeyeater makes the waterhole look big.
181010_blog challenge_pool_pond_scarlet honeyeater
A White-throated Honeyeater enjoyed a drink.181010_blog challenge_pool_pond_white throated honeyeater
A yellow-faced Honeyeater was joined by some Fuscous Honeyeaters. There were so many Fuscous Honeyeaters that I couldn’t count them.181010_blog challenge_pool_pond_yellow faced honeyeater_fuscous honeyeaters

This is a small amount of the birds that were there. The air was filled with bird song. A lovely way to spend the afternoon, sitting and watching until the mosquitoes sent me on the track back home.

August at the Bird Bath

There has been lots of activity at the bird bath. August was very dry so the water in the bird baths at home had to be replenished often. I have three bird baths around my house. This is what has been happening at just one.

This is the view I have of the bird bath from my verandah so it makes it easier to get a few photos. The birds still notice me and often fly off.
bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

The King Parrots are easy to spot when they visit the bird bath.
king parrot_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

When competing families arrive at the same time, a bit of arguing takes place.
180822_blog challenge_scene_birdbath7_king parrots

Notice the look on the Yellow-faced Honeyeater on the left. They are the guardians of the bird bath and swoop in to scare other birds away. The Lewins Honeyeater was rather nonplussed at the Yellow-faced Honeyeaters presence.
yellow faced honeyeater_lewins honeyeater_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

The Silvereyes quite often arrive on mass
silvereyes_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

Looks like the White-throated Honeyeater is surrounded. One Yellow-faced Honeyeater has been in for a bath, no longer looking sleek.
yellow faced honeyeaters_white throated honeyeater_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

I only just caught a Buff-rumped Thornbill who flew off before I could get set for another photo.
buff rumped thornbill_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

The Eastern Yellow Robin didn’t look pleased to have a post bath photo taken.
eastern yellow robin_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

A typical stance of a Yellow-faced Honeyeater. The Eastern Yellow Robin didn’t care much while a White-throated Treecreeper waits his turn.
eastern yellow robin_yellow faced honeyeater_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

A Grey Fantail gets ready to get into the bird bath.
grey fantail_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

As usual, a White-throated Honeyeater waits out of sight when a gang of Yellow-faced Honeyeaters arrive at the bird bath.
white throated treecreeper_yellow faced honeyeaters_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

I love the way the Treecreepers sit on the edge of the bird bath. He seems taken a back at the Yellow-faced Honeyeaters attitude.
white throated treecreeper_yellow faced honeyeater_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

Peace at last and time for a bath. Look at those feet, made for scaling vertical surfaces.
white throated treecreeper_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

The White-throated Honeyeaters often arrive in numbers too.
white throated honeyeatersr_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

How embarrassing seeing me like this the Eastern Yellow Robins seems to say as a flock of Silvereyes arrive.
silvereyes_eastern yellow robin_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

A Scarlet Honeyeater watches on as the Silvereyes take a drink
silvereyes_scarlet honeyeater_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

The Red-browed Firetail Finch and Silvereye discuss their day while hanging around the bird bath.
red browed firetail_silvereye_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

The Eastern Spinebill was not sure about having a Yellow-faced Honeyeater at the bird bath.
red browed firetail_eastern spinebill_yellow faced honeyeater_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

The Noisy Friarbird isn’t the most handsome visitor to the bird bath
noisy friarbird_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

Pied Currawongs drop in from time to time. They have a disgusting habit of vomiting food pellets into the water before drinking necessitating in water changes.
currawong_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

The Female or Juvenile Satin Bowerbird love the bird bath.
bowerbird_female_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

They make a huge splash when the plop into the water.
bowerbird_splash_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

The Male Satin Bowerbird is wonderful. The camera doesn’t quite catch the sheen and colour shifts from black to blue
satin bower bird_male_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

The Rainbow Lorikeets are the most colourful visitors to the bird bath.
rainbow lorikeets_bird bath_named_home_aug 2018

I hoped you enjoyed your visit to the bird bath. Did you have a favourite bird at the bird bath?

This is September: The birds

G’day,
September, the first month of Spring but still no rain. The last drop of rain I have had was 6mls on the 6th July. Good news is there was 21mls over the last weekend. The dry Winter and September didn’t  stop the Grevillieas from flowering. I didn’t include many Grevilleas in this or the next blog. You can see them here from a previous blog. But I digress. This part of This is September is just the birds. The next blog is everything else as I looked at the number of photos and there are too many for one blog. I didn’t want your cuppa to get cold scrolling through or fall asleep before the end.

Ready……..lets get going.

The first lot are birds who are not very good at hiding, although some were just sheltering from the heat of the day probably.

The Australian Raven gave the game away by incessantly calling.
australian raven_hiding_named_grafton_sept 2017

The Noisy Friarbird was in the Sweet Pittosporum
noisy friarbird_hiding_named_home_sept 2017

The Little Friarbird was hiding behind the Mago
little friarbird_looking_named_home_sept 2017

The Striated Thornbill was hiding in the Hibiscus
striated thornbill_named_binna burra_sept 2017

Can you spot the White-throated Treecreeper?
white throated tree creeper_hiding_named_home_sept 2017

The Figbird was trying to be inconspicuous
fig bird_named_home_sept 2017

Little Friarbirds don’t hide very well do they?
little friarbird_hiding_named_home_sept 2017

I love seeing the Variegated Fairy Wrens hopping through the garden. They usually come in small flocks looking among the bushes and flowers for insects or heading to the birdbath.
The females are hard to see aren’t they?
variegated fairy wren_female_named_binna burra_sept 2017

Whereas the males really stand out
variegated fairy wren_males_named_binna burra_sept 2017

They are so cute when they sit together
variegated fairy wren_male_female_named_binna burra_sept 2017

As the weather has been very warm, almost Summer temperatures, the bird bath was the place to be. The Little Friarbird came for a drink.
little friarbird_birdbath01_named_home_sept 2017

Bottoms up
little friarbird_drinking_birdbath_named_home_sept 2017

Looking about before having another drink
little friarbird_birdbath_named_home_sept 2017

A Spangled Drongo seemed to have a gargle
spangled drongo_birdbath_named_home_sept 2017

While a White-throated Treecreeper jumped in and splashed about
white throated treecreeper_birdbath_splash_named_home-sept 2017

Sometimes you can emerge from the birdbath looking a bit bedraggled like this White-throated Honeyeater
white throated honeyeater_birdbath_named_home_sept 2017

Eastern Whipbirds love the birdbath
whipbird01_in birdbath_named_binna burra_sept 2017

Almost ready for another dip
whipbird02_birdbath_named_binna burra_sept 2017

Lewins Honeyeaters like the mosaics of this birdbath
lewins honeyeater_named_binna burra_sept 2017
Of course there are birds who live in the water. Darters enjoy a swim
darter_named_grafton_sept 2017
While other birds prefer to be in the trees. Blue-faced Honeyeaters enjoy lunch
blue faced honeyeater_named_home_sept 2017

blue faced honeyeater01_named_home_sept 2017

Figbirds wonder what other birds are doing
figbird_looking_named_home_sept 2017

Yellow-faced Honeyeaters like sitting on sticks
yellow faced honeyeater_named_home_sept 2017

A regular Spring visitor is the Rufous Whistler who sing their little hearts out during the day
rufous whistler_named_home_sept 2017

The Square-tailed Kites have come back to their nest from last year to raise more chicks
square tailed kite_nest_named_home_sept 2017

Other birds don’t mind a stroll about. A Grey-shrike Thrush hopped about the leaf litter
grey shrike thrush_named_binna burra_sept 2017

On their regular patrol around the garden, the Wonga Pigeons stopped for a drink.
wongas_named_binna burra_sept 2017

A Common Bronzewing takes a walk along the road
common bronzewing_named_home_sept 2017

I like the first signs of Spring when the Rufous Whistler and the Spangled Drongos arrive at my place. Did you have a favourite bird?

 

The birds of June

It may be Winter, but here, it is the time when birds drop in on their way north to build their strength for the next part of their journey, or stay for the winter in the warm days on the North Coast. The nights can get cold but the days are usually in the low 20’s C with the warmth of sunshine and the number of plants that flower in late Autumn and Winter makes it a good place to stop off. This is not a complete record of birds as there have been birds who I haven’t managed to get in my lens plus there has been some who have just been to fast for me to photograph. Yes I have quite a number of photos of empty branches!!!

This first gallery of photos are the birds from my place.

The White-throated Honeyeaters arrive in the morning and in the afternoon with their chirp chirp chirp as they set about diving into the birdbath or pool to have their bath.
white throated honeyeater_named_home_june 2017

The Yellow-faced Honeyeaters arrive from down south, some stay while others in the flock fly further north.
yellow faced honeyeater_named_home_june 2017

The Blue-faced Honeyeaters come and go all year depending on what food is available. The Honey Gem Grevillea has finally started to flower after a long dry hot Summer. Look at the pollen dust on his head.
blue faced honeyeater_named_home_june 2017

The little Eastern Spinebills are here with the distinctive clicking of their wings as they zip around the garden and their calls echoing in the gullies.
eastern spinebill_named_home_june 2017

You can judge their size by comparing with the Blue-faced Honeyeater and Grevillea flower above. They really stretch to reach the blossoms at times.
eastern spinebill_named_home_june 2017 (2)

Their plumage is quite pretty don’t you think?
eastern spinebill_honey gem_named_home_june 2017

I don’t include many photos of the female Golden Whistler but this one is so cute. They are around the place all year round with their repetitive call which can sound like a squeaky wheel, at times up to twenty single notes.
eastern yellow robin_named_home_june2017
They also like to land on the side of trees and have a look around.eastern yellow robin_named_home_june 2017

As do the White-throated Treecreepers who just hop up and down the trees looking for insects under the bark. They have a similar call to the Yellow Robins but not as persistent.
white throated treecreeper_named_home_june 2017

They also like to defy gravity as the give the trees a very thorough checking over.
white treecreeper_hanging_named_home_june 2017
The tiny Red-backed Fairy Wrens like to explore the lower parts of the forest eating grass seeds and insects foraging among the grass stalks. The Jenny Wren has good camouflage.  wren_named_home_june 2017

The Silvereyes are migrants who stop for a few weeks to gather their strength for their next leg of their journey north.
silvereye01_named_home_june 2017

They are another of the tiny birds around here.
silvereye02_pink bloodwood nuts_named_home_june 2017

The Red-browed Firetails are another constant visitor to the bush as they move about in small flocks looking for grass seeds. This is a young one as the red brow isn’t as prominent as the adults.
red browed finch01_named_home_june 2017

The tiny Striated Thornbills are always around the garden and in the gullies around the house.
striated thornbill01_named_home 2017

They love the birdbath.
striated thornbill02_named_home_june 2017

Someone who I haven’t seen for quite a while has turned up this month and has been around the garden early in the morning and in the gullies during the day. The Spotted Pardalote digs a tunnel in the side of the gully to make it’s nest. They are so pretty aren’t they?
spotted pardelote02_named_home_june 2017

I think this one saw me as I snuck along the verandah for a better photo.
spotted pardelote01_named_home_june 2017

They can be quite vocal too.
spotted pardalote_named_home_june 2017

The sounds of Kookaburras signal the start and end of every day. There are about three families that live in the bush around the house and sometimes the cacophony of up to five or six Kookaburras can be quite deafening.
kookaburras02_named_home_june 2017

After I took this photo I noticed that there was another two sitting nearby in separate trees. All of a sudden they all flew off into the forest disappearing among the trees.
kookaburras01_named_home_june 2017

This next gallery are from my besties place.

The Lewins Honeyeater is the boss of my besties garden. They swoop on most other birds that dares to come into the garden. The Lewins at my place aren’t as bossy.
lewins honeyeater_named_binna burra_june 2017

Can you spot the Varied Triller?
varied triller_named_binna burra_june 2017

The Grey Fantails are always doing their acrobatic flying around the place catching insects on the wing. A very serious looking bird.
grey fantail_named_binna burra_june 2017

The Golden Whistler is always around the garden and nearby rainforest singing its lovely song.
golden whistler_named_binna burra_june 2017

My besties place is surrounded by rainforest so she has more doves and pigeons than I do at my place. The White-headed Pigeon has a deep sounding whoomp whoomp call. They also fly about in large flocks.
white headed pigeon_named_binna burra_june 2017

The Brown Pigeon didn’t want its photo taken.
brown pigeon_named_binna burra_june 2017

There is always up to ten bar-shouldered Doves foraging on the ground in the garden looking for pecans that have fallen from the tree.
bar shouldered dove_named_binna burra_june 2017

The Whipbirds also enjoy foraging among the leaves for pecans.
whipbird_pecan_named_binna burra_june 2017

While high in the trees the Figbirds look for seeds as well as pecans. This female Figbird found the seeds of an Umbrella Tree.
fig bird_female_named_binna burra_june 2017

The male Figbird was more interested in pecans.
figbird_male_named_home_june 2017

The Green Catbird is also interested in pecans. Not long after this photo was taken, so was the pecan.
catbird_pecan_named_binna burra_june 2017

Another recipient of the fallen pecans is the large Brush Turkey. His strong beak breaks open the pecans and often leaves small pieces behind for the other birds to eat. This one we call Brendan who has taken over the garden and has a mound nest almost one meter tall in the front garden. One day I’ll try to get a photo of Brendan and his mound.
brush turkey_named_binna burra_june 2017

The most exciting discovery was finding a Regent Bowerbird just on the edge of the garden late one afternoon. I only managed to get a couple of bad photos but had to share in my excitement.
regent bowerbird_named_binna burra_june 2017

We went to Byron Bay one day to shop as we haven’t been for ages and Winter is a good time as the number of tourists is halved at least. The Golden Pendas are in flower and the Rainbow Lorikeets were having a great time screeching at each other.
rainbow lorikeet_named_home_june 2017

And of course there are always chooks foraging around both our gardens.
chook_named_home_june 2017

That is a snapshot of some of the birds around here in June. My June photo round-up probably won’t have any birds this year. Hopefully I’ll get to that by next week.

 

Birds and butterflies and perhaps a snail

I really enjoy sitting down and writing. Something I haven’t done a lot of lately so this little bit of writing includes a lot of photos. I was intending to do a series of birdbath photos. Instead here is a selection of the two birdbaths, my besties birdbath and the small hanging pot that I found some of the birds at my place love to visit.

First off is the birdbath that has been a regular feature in a lot of my blogs. I still remember the first time I saw a Noisy Friarbird. They are so prehistoric looking. I tell visitors that they are Australia’s only vulture. Naughty aren’t I? Their songs are one of the most distinctive as they call in the bush. I love seeing them when two Noisy Friarbirds sing in unison, both doing the same movements as well.

friarbird_bird bath_named_binna burra_march 2016

The little Eastern Yellow Robin must have had a hot tail as he sat with his tail in the water for quite some time.

eastern yellow robin_bird bath_named_binna burra_march 2016

The White-browed Scrubwren was far more interested in what the other scrubwrens were doing underneath the birdbath.

white browed scrubwren_bird bath_named_binna burra_march 2016

“Oh for goodness sake, tidy yourself up!” The Spangled Drongos having a lovely time at the birdbath.

spangled drongos__bird bath_named_binna burra_march 2016

I wonder what the Little Wattlebird was giving the Drongo the stink eye about?

spangled drongo_wattlebird_bird bath_named_binna burra_march 2016

Here is the little hanging pot. One day the hole in the bottom was blocked with some leaves and dirt. It filled with water after the rain and I heard some birds having a good time, drinking and having a splash about. I sealed the bottom and now keep it filled with water. The small birds, especially the honeyeaters, are the ones who use it the most.

bird bath_small_named_home_march 2016

The White-throated Honeyeaters are regular users. They are here every afternoon to have a drink or a bit of a splash in the water.

white-throated honeyeaters_bird bath_named_home_march 2016

One has a bath while the others keep a look out.

white-throated honeyeater01_named_small_crop_home_march 2016

The Brown Honeyeater caught with his tongue out after taking a drink.

brown honeyeater_bird bath_named_home_march 2016

The Lewins Honeyeaters are in the garden most of the day. This one came for a drink in the middle of a rather warm March day.

lewins honeyeater_named_home_march 2016

Another tongue out shot. This time of a White-throated Honeyeater.

white throated honeyeater_bird bath_named_home_march 2016

You can see why I need to keep the water up to the birdbath. The Lewins certainly enjoy a good splash.

lewins honeyeater_bird bath_splash_named_home_march 2016

The White-throated Honeyeaters are a bit more refined in their bathing habits.

white throated honeyeater_bird bath_splash_named_home_march 2016

I love seeing the little Thornbills in the garden. They always seem to have something to investigate.

thornbill_named_binna burra_march 2016

The Whipbirds are always hiding behind something or rustling about in the garden under the bushes.

eastern whipbird_named_binna burra_march 2016

Enough of the birds. I also love Dragonflies. We were doing some bush regen down at the spring, when this Dragonfly took an interest in what we were doing. Yes, that is one of the lantana bushes he is sitting on that got pulled out.

dragonfly01_red_named_march 2016

After a bit more zooming around, I realised that he was doing something other than watching what we were doing. At least it reminded us to have a break and a snack.

dragonfly01_snack_named_march 2016

Speaking of snacks. There was a loud buzzing and upon investigating, there was the fly caught in the web and a Daddy Long Legs getting ready to wrap the fly up for his dinner. Fly wrap anybody?

spider_fly_crop_named_binna burra_march 2016

I don’t think it is fair to be called common but the butterfly world has many “common” butterflies. This Common Crow was very obliging to have its photo taken.

common crow butterfly_named_lismore_march 2016

The Pentas are a great flowering shrub for butterflies.

butterfly02_pentas_named_binna burra_march 2016

Butterflies are so delicate as they stand on flowers to gather nectar.

butterfly01_pentas_named_binna burra_march 2016

Getting your proboscis right in there seems to be the way to go.

butterfly_pentas_named_binna burra_march 2016

The Orchard Butterflies were in the garden a lot in march. These two were having a good time fluttering around the garden.

orchard butterflies02_home_named_march 2016

Quite often their dance became quite close and eventually there was a lot of blurred photos as they mated. As this isn’t one of “those” blogs I haven’t included the very blurry photos, mainly as they were very blurry

orchard butterflies01_home_crop_small_named_march 2016

Aren’t they beautiful big butterflies?

orchard butterfly01_home_named_march 2016

Oh. That’s right. I did mention a snail didn’t I. One evening I went into the bathroom and saw something high up on the wall. The soft-shelled native snail was very shy and seemed to sense when I was close trying to get a photo and went into it’s shell. At least I know what was making holes in the leaves of the plant in the bathroom.

snail_soft shelled_crop_named_home_march 2013

I am glad you have gotten to the end of one of the longest blogs I have done. Did you enjoy the journey? What was your favourite photo?