I picked these

The Lens-Artists Challenge #125: You Pick It

This is an interesting challenge due to Tina’s opening inviting us into the challenge with “This week it’s all up to you – you get to choose your subject and to share whatever it is about it that you find interesting. Personally, I’ve chosen last week’s introduction to the concept of Wabi-Sabi, particularly as it relates to art and photography, as my topic.

Wabi-Sabi has me intrigued as my initial though was to just bung up a couple of flowers and say I picked these.

But no, I had to go down a bit of a Wabi-Sabi rabbit hole of discovery. This definition was quite good “Although Wabi-sabi can be hard to define, we can translate its simplified meaning to “rustic simplicity” or “understated elegance” with a focus on a less-is-more mentality, while “taking pleasure in the imperfect”.”

When looking for Wabi-Sabi perhaps “Wabi-sabi is a cracked and glued together ceramic bowl (check the concept of kintsugi); a funnily shaped, home-grown tomato; a dinner created from leftovers; falling cherry blossom; a worn wooden hallway and an elbow patch on your favourite jumper. Therefore, it’s an appreciation of all that is simple, modest and imperfect. Yet, loved deeply.”

So where to from here. Want to find out? Let’s have a go at my interpretation of Wabi-Sabi through a photographers eyes

I added this one for a bit of Zen fun

From the website – https://japanahome.com/journal/wabi-sabi-how-to-embrace-this-ancient-japanese-philosophy-at-home-and-life/

Wabi- sabi and Zen 

Wabi-Sabi’s roots lie in Zen Buddhism, which a Chinese twelfth century monk (Eisai) brought to Japan. Zen stresses austerity, communion with nature, and above all, reverence for everyday life as the real path to enlightenment. To reach enlightenment, Zen monks lived ascetic, often isolated lives, and sat for long periods of concentrated meditation.

In Zen philosophy, there are seven aesthetic principles in achieving Wabi-sabi:

Kanso — simplicity

Fukinsei — asymmetry or irregularity

Shibumi — beauty in the understated

Shizen — naturalness without pretension

Yugen — subtle grace

Datsuzoku — freeness

Seijaku — tranquility

wabi sabi tea ceremony

Thanks Tina for taking me to Japan and back for a while

Leaves for the season

Terri’s Sunday Stills: A Celebration of #Leaves

Well I don’t really have Autumn (Fall) here at my pace. My seasons are usually cold(ish) for a few weeks and dry (your Winter) or hot and wet, in a good season (your Summer) with mild weather for Autumn and Spring which can be a bit wet but is the best time to plant and get out in the garden. Basically wet and dry are my seasons.

I do like finding interesting leaves around the place. Some of the ones in this post are from lots of places but mainly in Australia

Terri asked for a song so one of my favourites, so please enjoy while you look at some leaves that I have found.

I wonder, does a Leafy Sea Dragon count?

Hope you had a bit of enjoyment from my leaf collection.

Acres of ochre

Terri’s Sunday Stills: Fall Colour Challenge – Acres of #Ochre

It’s Spring here in Australia so I may have to delve into the achieves for a bit of ochre.

Stuck in the sand

Jude’s 2020 Photo Challenge #12: Texture

This month we are going to look at textures. While the structure of an object is its form, the material from which it is made constitutes its texture. Is it hard or soft, smooth or rough?  You are aiming at translating texture visually, bringing life and energy to a photo through shape, tone and colour. Study the texture and forget about the object. Texture becomes the subject here.

    • Try contrasting rough against smooth
    • Shoot at different times of the day. Does it change the effect?
    • Capture details – like the fibres in a rope or a carpet.
    • Try altering the angle of light to avoid flat and dull images. You might be able to do this with your editing software too.
    • Use different angles to discover how much texture appears.

This weeks assignment: Try to mix your texture with other colours and patterns

A bit of contrast of textures, not many colours but perhaps patterns in a way. Found while at a river crossing where a flood came through a few week ago. Photographed from the low level bridge on a bright sunny day. Image is unaltered.

20200322_blog challenge_texture_sand_leaf

Balanced Composition

CitySonnet’s February photo a day challenge 26th: Balanced Composition

181126_blog challenge_balance_skeleton

All things, that if I were to be serious, a Balanced Composition the above isn’t.

Balanced composition is harmonious, simply the elements of that picture are symmetrical about the center, horizontal or vertical symmetry.”

flower_centre_named_binna burra_june 2017

190730_blog_challenge_brick_tile_floor_tile_leaf

Varieties of Brown

Nancy’s Photo a Week Challenge: Brown

In nature – a leaf
brown leaf_verandah boards
a Brown Pigeon watching mebrown-oigeon_named_binna-burra_oct-2016
a Common Brown Butterfly171115_blog challenge_letter M_butterfly_common brown
Brown Honeyeaters love Grevillea flowersgeoffs garden_grevillea_brown honeyeater_named_oct 2017
From the past a rusty chainrust_chain1
A Hereford cow on a farm enjoyed her photo portraitcow_whyralla_named_feb 2014

And some days your hair just gets out of control
poultry_show_fluffy_brown_chook_named_lismore_april 2019

This is October 2019

Oh my aren’t I tardy with the October wrap up? Lots of things have been happening – see some of the posts over the past week. I shan’t dwell on the most horrible situation I find myself in right now. I guess you have seen all about the fires in Australia, The north coast of NSW is where I live and the fires have been burning since early October.

I can’t really think straight as I haven’t slept well for a while now. Luckily and the end of October to early November my bestie and I had a brief holiday in Tasmania. I hadn’t been before so it was all new. Breathing air that wasn’t smoke laden was a blessing as was cool temperatures and even a bit of rain. That will be a post of its own later when I get around to it.

OK there isn’t all that many photos compared to previous “This is” posts but still grab a snack and a drink of your choice so you can stroll through my world in October.

I haven’t posted many photos of the Red-necked Wallabies that hang around my garden for a while. This little Joey has fun speeding around.
red necked wallaby_garden_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

His Mum was keeping watch. Check out those lovely lashes.
red-necked wallaby_named_home_jackadgery_pct 2019
I was out on a walk with my bestie and a friend when we came across some Eastern Grey Kangaroos resting in the shade. There was a female, a Joey and a male. When the male stood up we stopped and waited to see what they would do. Thankfully they group hopped over the fence in one bound and into the next paddock. When he stood up to his full height, he was about 2 meters tall. Look at those chest and arm muscles!! eastern grey kangaroo_male_named_caniaba_oct 2019
I may be in drought but every evening the frogs start up, not as many as usual. I love these tiny Eastern Dwarf Tree Frogs. Here he is again in a previous post that has the call as well.eastern dwarf green tree frog_garden_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Meet Bob, one of the funniest fish I have ever seen. He would swim away and then appear from the side of the tank, look at you and swim away. The Seahorse World where he lives is at Beauty Point in Tasmania.fish_bob_named_aquarium_tasmania_oct 2019
A regular sight around the north coast are Black-shouldered Kites hovering over a field waiting for snack to make a move then drop like a stone.black-shouldered kite_hover_named_caniaba_oct 2019
Here is one some of the European readers will know. The European Goldfinch was introduced into SE Australia and Tasmania in the 1850’s.european goldfinch_named_tasmania_oct 2019
A Forest Kingfisher waits patiently on the power lines in the late afternoon for his meal to move in the paddock below.forest kingfisher_powerline_named_caniaba_oct 2019
The little hanging pot bird bath is too small for the King Parrot but its good for drinking. The Hippeastrums will come later.king parrot_hippeastrum_garden_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
One very unseasonably hot day, the temperature reached 38C IN SPRING!!! Here is a young King Parrot and a Spangled Drongo discussing the day, “hot enough for ya”king_parrot_spangled_drongo_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Down at the waterhole on 3rd after a good fall of rain. Lovely to see a bit of water. The last rain since.waterhole_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

Going up into the mountains for a bit of a walk and see new places. The players of the mountains from my favourite spot, the Raspberry Lookout.
raspberry_lookout_smoke_layers_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
Another place near Washpool, (which is now on fire) The smoke is from the fires to the north in early October.lookout_smoke_layers_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
I love finding a leaf that has been skeletised (OK I made up that word according to spellcheck)leaf_skeleton_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
The new Spring flush of leaves on a Eucalypt.leaves_eucalypt_new_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019
The Casuarina and the blue of the distant hills. My bestie reckons it is like a Japanese print.she-oak_tree_named_gibraltar_range_nov 2019
One of the new crops on the north coast is dryland rice.rice_named_springgrove_oct 2019
Back at the waterhole on my place. The ferns in shelter spots are growing well. This is called a Five Fingered Jack or a Rough Maidenhair Fern.fern_five_finger_jack_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

While in the Gibraltar Ranges in Spring I was hoping to find some native flowers. Here is a Blue Dampiera.
flower_native_blue dampiera_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

Tiny False Lilac flowers
flower_native_false lilac_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

A Hairy Bush Pea with a Native Stingless Bee
flower_native_hairy bush pea_raspberry_bee_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

Don’t the little Small Leaved Boronia look ever so sweet.
flower_native_small leaved boronia_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

There were lots of White Paper Daisies along the road sides.
flower_native_white paper daisy_raspberry_lookout_named_gibraltar_range_oct 2019

The flowers of a Flapjack Succulent
flower_succulent_pancake_named_caniaba_garden_oct 2019

The first time this plant from my old mate Geoffs place has flowered and I can’t remember what it is
crinum_flower_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
My besties Foxgloves flowered well this yearflower_foxglove_named_caniaba_garden_oct 2019
The start of my Hippeastrums hippeastrum_flower_spear_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
More have started to bud uphippeastrum_flower_buds_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Once the flowers arrive, so do the Native Stingless Beesstingless native bees_hippeastrum_red_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
Look at the amount of pollen in the flowers. The Native Stingless Bees get coated in pollenstingless native bees_hippiastrum_pollen_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
An olden Hibiscus at my besties attracts a bee or is it a wasp?flower_hibiscus_bee_named_caniaba_oct 2019
Casting a fine web, this spider waits underneath for lunch to drop in.spider_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019
OK all is done. I had to include a photo of our Sun late in the afternoon on a fire day. A mixture of clouds and smoke.sun_fire_sky_smoke_named_home_jackadgery_oct 2019

I hope you enjoyed a stroll through my October. Did you have a favourite photo? I love to hear what you think so please drop me a line. I guess I need conversation

also for Su’s Changing Seasons