This is July 2022

July saw Winter arrive here. The first week was wet on the odd day or two but then the rest of July has lovely sunny days – 20c plus. The nights then dropped into single figures and the fire was lit earlier in the afternoon as the cool breeze blew down the mountains.

I didn’t get out very much to take photos so most of this month are photos from my garden. The only exciting day out was going to Ballina and seeing the Humpback Whale migration.

Your July song to scroll to

July saw the start of the foggy mornings. I took this one early in the month when I went down to check on how much rain was in the rain gauge.

The Nectarine and Peach trees are starting to come into blossom. The foggy morning provided a good background.

One morning I looked out of the kitchen window and saw all these Peaceful Doves on the ground. This was most unusual as when they are around there, they are foraging for food, not sitting still. At first I wondered if they were dead, so I grabbed my camera to have a closer look and saw some fast asleep and others opening and closing their eyes. Next time I looked they were gone. Most unusual.

The mornings are always punctuated with Whipbird calls echoing around the gullies that are on both sides of the house.

In July, the Whipbirds have been in the garden most days. All the photos have been taken out of the windows as they are quite shy and will disappear at the slightest movement. This is the first time I have seen both of them together.

They are quite striking looking birds

Yes it does look like I was spotted in the sun room trying to sneak a few more photos. I probably took over a hundred photos over the month, many duds or the window does need cleaning.

One morning I spied a Lewins Honeyeater lurking in the Honey Gem Grevillea.

A Blue-faced Honeyeater was quite serious getting some nectare from the Honey Gem flower.

Outside of the office, Satin Bowerbirds hopped onto the branch to see what I was doing. It is so hard to get the amazing colours and shades with a photo.

Yellow-faced Honeyeaters can always be heard chattering away around the garden all day.

The garden wouldn’t be complete without an Eastern Yellow Robin splashing yellow about the garden as they fly about.

The female Golden Whistler comes into the garden but the fabulously coloured male doesn’t seem to. He stays in the gullies calling the most splendid song.

A Grey Butcherbird hangs about occasionally looking for a snack or two.

One day I saw a lot of movement in the garden. Venturing out onto the verandah I saw a small flock of Variegated Fairy Wrens investigating the soil as well as under leaves and on branches for food. A female Jenny Wren hoped to find something on a Fan Palm leaf.

The flocked never stayed still for long so it was hard to follow them through the garden. I eventually came across the male Variegated Fairy Wren as he made sure his harem was safe.

The Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos have been around for the last few days of July. Their raucous calls let me know they have arrived in the late afternoon to chew the bark of the Eucalypts to get the grubs. It was hard to get good photos as they were high in the trees.

The Eastern Spinebills have been around in the garden for a few months now. It is hard not to want to get photos of them especially when they are in the Firesticks Grevillea. This one eyed me suspiciously early in the month but now they don’t mind me wandering about.

The bees don’t have much to feed on at the moment but the Pentas were still flowering at the start of July.

The Bottlebrush, just like the Grevilleas have had another flowering. Perhaps once the rain slowed down and the ground is starting to dry, they decide to have another flowering. Lots of bees and birds are always hanging about.

One day I’ll find out the name of this pretty orchid that grows on long spikes. I love the splash of colour they provide amongst the green of the plants in the garden.

When at Ballina Beach for a fish and chips lunch and hoping to see some Humpback Whales, the Sooty Oystercatchers patrolled the beach looking for their lunch.

I did manage to get one whale photo out of a lot of splash photos. It is quite difficult when trying to get a photo from the shore

Late in the afternoon, the Buddha sits serenely in the last of the warming sun.

I hope this finds you serene and at peace with all that surrounds. Did you have a favourite?
Perhaps you would like to join us with your post?

About The Changing Seasons

The Changing Seasons is a monthly project where bloggers around the world share their thoughts and feelings about the month just gone. We all approach this slightly differently, though generally with an emphasis on the photos we’ve taken during the month.

For many of us, looking back over these photos provides the structure and narrative of our post, so each month is different. Some focus on documenting the changes in a particular project — such as a garden, an art or craft project, or a photographic diary of a familiar landscape.

But in the end, it is your changing season, and you should approach it however works for you.

There are no fixed rules around post length or photo number — just a request that you respect your readers’ time and engagement.

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Tag your photos with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons so that others can find them

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This is July 2021 – Changing Seasons

Last month was the first post from Ju-Lyn at Touring My Backyard for The Changing Seasons. Ju-Lyn and I will be taking turns at hosting The Changing Seasons that Su from Zimmerbitch hosted with great results. We hope you will enjoy, as you have done in the past, and keep posting your Changing Seasons with us. Just add your link in the comments or pingback to this post for your Changing Seasons.

I have had an action packed July with my camera being able to get around the local area despite the Covid restrictions that the state of NSW is currently under. There has been a couple of “incidents” on the North Coast from people coming from Sydney Covid positive. A lot of businesses are starting to not allow customers from Sydney into their premises.

Enough of the doom and gloom, something I am not used to posting on my blog. Let’s start with an Aussie song you all should know to get you through the photos.

I thought we should start a bit bright and cheerful with some flowers.

My Bromiliads flowered with such unusual flowers

My besties Gymea Lily sent up a spear. It’s about three metres tall.

The flower is yet to open and as I haven’t been there for almost two weeks, I hope it waits until I can get there to show you the flower.

A while ago I was talking about my poor sad Peach Tree. It seems to enjoy July don’t you think?

The flowers have a lovely deep pink colour. I know a couple of people will love this colour.

The bees love the flowers too.

Just beside the Peach is a Nectarine Tree and the Stingless Native Bees are loving the blossoms of light pink petals with a rosy centre.

There has been a few Black Jezebel Butterflies in the garden too.

It’s not just the insects who love the flowers. The Brown Honeyeater enjoys snacking on Lions Tails flowers.

The Rainbow Lorikeets flock to the Honey Gem Grevillea in the morning.

Lewins Honeyeaters like to pick the centre from the Ornamental Ginger flowers

Can you count the number of King Parrots in the red Bottlebrush? I have lot of King Parrots in the garden.

This female King Parrot was watching me as I was walking in the garden.

There is always someone peeking through the window to see if I am home.

or peeking over the gutter

Or sitting in the tree where this Pied Currawong was outside of my office door.

One wonderful thing is that a Chatter (yes that’s the name for a group of Choughs) of White-winged Choughs have increased in number and often cackle away while picking their way through the garden.

Driving home a few days ago I heard the sounds of Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos flying overhead. I saw them start to land so jumped out of the car camera in hand. Of course they decided to fly off to a distant tree. There were a lot of Cockatoos in the flock. This is just a few as others had landed in other trees further away.

Getting out to the beach was good way to spend the day even though it was very windy.

I think that there is a system of ownership of this rock. The Crested Terns were sitting there as I walked past.

On the way back, the Cormorant had taken over

Pied Oystercatchers were combing the beach for morsels in the sand.

The Sooty Oystercatcher decided the rocks was the best place to find a snack.

A Pelican was taking a stroll along the sand.

and another Pelican enjoyed a cruise on the Clarence River

Overhead it was rather busy. A Brahminy Kite scanned the beach intent on stealing whatever the Gulls had found.

A White-bellied Sea Eagle was hovering and circling in the wind right near us looking among the rock pools where the Sooty Oystercatcher was as well.

The brown on the outer side of it’s wings is lovely

At full stretch doing a turn in the wind ready to circle back and scan once more

We were also lucky enough to see the Humpback Whales on their northerly migration even though they were not very close to the shore.

It was an amazing sight to see hundreds of Ibis heading west to the wetlands where they will spend the rest of Winter and in Spring, raise their hatchlings.

One afternoon in the grey afternoon sky, a pair of Ibis were heading to roost.

Speaking of roosting. Down at the beach there is a colony of Red-Headed Flying Foxes who were squabbling over the best places and getting ready to fly off for their nightly foraging.

While in the trees, for Becky’s July Square Trees photo challenge, I posted the avenue of Fig Trees but from one end, I commented to Becky that I should have taken a photo in the middle. Yesterday in the late afternoon I did just that – and it’s even square.

Sitting in the garden the sun reflected off something that caught my eye. It was a rather ragged spiders web which had the most amazing colours.

Only a little bit of rain for July but thee is always the opportunity for a water drop photo.

One thing I like to photograph is rusty things. The steel and the rivets plus their shadow on the Grafton Bridge.

While looking on the other side, the setting looked rather idyllic

I love clouds and these in horizontal layers with varying colours one afternoon looked wonderful.

OK folks it time for sunset and to reach the end of my July and Changing Seasons.

I hope you enjoyed a scroll though my July and enjoyed the sunset as much as the cows do.

Did you have a favourite photo? See you next month for This is August 2021 and Ju-Lyn will be hosting The Changing Seasons

Square Trees #24 – big tree blue sea

Becky’s Square Photo Challenge July: Square Tree

Todays square tree is a Pandanus Tree
Pandanus tectorius is a small tree which can reach 5-6 metres in height comprising separate male and female trees. The leaves have short spines along the edges and on their midribs. The plants are supported at the base by prop roots which help to anchor the plant in sandy soil. The tree may flower throughout the year. Female plants produce large pineapple-like fruits comprised, when ripe, of yellow, red or orange segments containing the individual seeds.
Parts of the fruit of the Pandanus are edible and it is reported to form a major source of food in Micronesia. The ripe segments of the fruit and the seeds can be roasted and eaten.

Your song for today

This is a great place to sit and watch for whales

The roots certainly have a good hold on the ground and are spreading down the cliff edge.

You may remember my Monday Portrait last Monday of the little fellow sitting in the tree. He was a pandanus nut, one of the segments of the fruit of the Pandanus Tree

A lovely shady spot on a warm day

You see what you want to see

Debbie’s quotation-inspired image

“The traveller sees what he sees. The tourist sees what he has come to see.
    – G.K. Chesterton

About 2 minutes into this narration from Harry Nilssons The Point, have a listen to the philosophy of the Rock Man inspired by Debbie’s quote

The traveller sees what he sees

The tourist sees what he has come to see.

This is September 2020

How are you going so far this year? I am still not allowed to drive so I haven’t had many photo excursions and at times didn’t really feel like taking photos. Do you have times like that too?

It is time to be in the garden and enjoy the warm days. A few days at my place the temperature was in the low 30’s which isn’t Spring weather, more like Summer. The rains that have been promised haven’t eventuated so I am using the dwindling dam water to keep the garden going as best I can. I have been doing a few projects both here at my place and at my besties.

The header photo is looking from my verandah into that part of the garden where the Grevilleas are having a great flowering this Spring.

Instead of having my usual song at the end, I decided to have it up front so you can have a listen while you scroll. So grab a cup of tea or coffee, perhaps a snack or if in the evening join me in a glass of your choice as it’s aperitivo time here. Enjoy

One project around the place was to do a rejuvenation of part of the shed. This will be the potting shed and have a lot of the gardening equipment and tools.

One of the bonuses of living on the north coast of NSW is being able to get down to the coast and watch the whales migrate.

Back at home for a few insects to start the photo journey of my September. The Pittosporum had so many flowers this year it was a treasure trove for the tiny Native Stingless Bees.

The Wide_brand Grass-dart butterfly was hard to catch as they didn’t sit still very long.

Southern Silver Ochre butterflies spent more time

The Black Jezebels came flying through regularly in September. The thing you notice is a white butterfly flitting among the flowers with its erratic flight. the next photo helps to explain.

This is the inside wings of the Black Jezebel. When they fly they give a sort of strobe effect designed to confuse any predators along with an erratic flight.

Another of the Jezebels, Southern Jezebels are always a delight to have in the garden. The Honey Gem Grevillea flowers were quite an attraction.

The Honey Gem and other grevilleas had an amazing flowering with a bit of rain in late August enough to get things happening in the garden in September. The Blue-faced Honeyeaters were the bullies of the garden chasing most of the birds, especially the noisy Friarbirds, away from the flowers.

But as you see the Noisy Friarbirds still were able to sneak in for a feed

Another of the Friarbird, Little Friarbirds, were constant visitors as well

I have been putting a bit of food out fro the birds every now and then but not every day so they don’t become dependent on food from me. The Female King Parrot really looked good with her breeding plumage.

The males were quite resplendent too. Remember Tiny, well he is still around the garden most days.

Leaden Flycatchers hung around the old swimming pool always on the lookout for a snack to come along.

I love their inquisitive looks so I had to include a second photo.

The Female Rufus Whistler also has an inquisitive look around the garden

The songs of the Rufus Whistlers have resounded in the bush all September. They are all around the surrounding forest occasionally coming into the garden. This male Rufus Whistler was singing in the garden early one morning.

One afternoon coming home from town, we were driving through South Grafton when a large flock of Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos came screeching into the trees in peoples backyards.

The Satin Bowerbird found where I dropped a few bread crumbs on the verandah. Satin Bowerbirds are quite nervous and will take off at the slightest movement. I often get a few photos through the door while sitting at my desk if I am sneaky enough.

At my besties the little Red-backed Wren come through her garden in the afternoons looking for a bit to eat among the flowers and garden beds.

We were sitting on her verandah having a cup of tea when we saw a large bird fly into the lower part of the garden. When I got to the other end of the verandah I saw a White-faced Heron walking along with a large stick. I watch where he flew into a nearby tree but he nest was too well hidden.

The tiny Scarlet Honeyeaters prefer red Grevillea flowers

If you need a break, here’s a bit of sky with a wispy cloud face or what can you see?

Yes it is Spring in Australia so no Spring post couldn’t go past without a few lots of flower photos, First up, a Daisy with an insect trying to hide. All of the following photos are from my besties garden except when I mention it’s from mine.

The Dianthus are a pretty shade of pink in the garden.

The white Gerbera really stands out

There are quite a few different Gazanias. I love this pink one

or perhaps I like this one more

The Cornflowers looked a treat

This Hibiscus was a new planting and I didn’t expect to see a flower this year on a small bush. the deep red is stunning

The violas are self seeding and springing up everywhere in the garden, even in the paths.

This is the red Hibiscus that came from my family home and is one of a couple that are in my garden.

My besties Lions Tails. Such an unusual plant.

It has been a great year for Grevilleas. Here is a selection from my place. Not too sure what this one is. I thought it was a Robyn Gordon but that doesn’t have yellow tips

This is a Robyn Gordon I am sure

The Ever strong Honey Gem, a great food source for birds as well as insects

After the fire at my place, there has been a lot of different species of Lomandra appearing. This is part of the flower stalk of a Lomandra mulitflora

A small native flower – a Gorse Bitter Pea. There are a lot of pea plants and many look similar

This pea flower is a Heathy Parrot Pea. Bunches of flowers on a long stalk. Most of these flowers are about 10mm or about half an inch as are many of the pea plant flowers.

The Paperbarks didn’t flower as well as I thought they would as most of the other native flowers like the Bottlebrush and Grevillea have. The flower is similar to a bottle brush flower only yellow instead of red.

I found this flowering plant on a walk along the trails of Evans Head. The aim was to photograph the native coastal plants flowers but by the time I was able to get there many had finished flowering. At least I saw the whales.

This Australian native flower is one of my all time favourites and is always a treat to find in the bush. I just love Flannel Flowers.

I finally found someone who laughs at my jokes.

Well it’s sunset so I better get going and you should too. Drop me a line if you found a favourite photo

One of the things about this September was that our Moon had risen before the sun had set. I love a Moon and a blue sky don’t you?

Also for Su’s Changing Seasons, September 2020

Return

The first Ragtag Daily Prompt from Emily: Return

Every year
the water’s filled
with splashes
with gasps
from the crowd
who line
the coast
hoping for a glimpse
of majestic
Humpback whales
as they return
to warmer waters
to calve
and mate
giving hope
of a new life
as they travel
giving pleasure
to people
who return
every year
to watch
and wait.

humpback_whale_tail_splash1_named_ballina_headland_june 2019

PS It’s my turn tomorrow for my first Ragtag Daily Prompt

This is June 2019

About time I hear you say. Yes I am a bit late with last months wrap up. I didn’t take as many photos early on and then I seemed to find lots to photograph. This months photos have a couple I have used in other photo challenges but I decided to keep this post a bit shorter by not including the those photos.

So sit back and have a scroll through my June

Let’s start in Inverell, a town about 200kms from my place. We decided to have a mini holiday and ventured west. My goodness the drought has really hit hard out there. Didn’t see the usual paddocks with sheep and cattle in them. Many farmers have de-stocked and just holding onto their core breeding stock for when the drought breaks.
We stayed at a fabulous B’n’B, Blair Athol a Manor house from the early 1900’s. It is a great place to stay
blair athol estate_house_named_inverell_june 2019
We did venture around the countryside. It was quite sad. I think this granite outcrop says it all.granite_rocks_outcrop_named_tingha_june 2019
I found a Pied Cormorant just after a bit of a dip in the water. I love how Cormorants do this. Makes me smile every time.pied_cormorant_named_inverell_june 2019
Back home I was surprised to see ducks on my house dam as the water level is quite low. Three Pacific Black Ducks cruise the dam.pacific_black_ducks_dam_named_home_jackadgery_june 2019
Sometimes when I am about in the garden doing a bit of bird spotting I get a feeling I am being watched as well. This Grey-shrike Thrush was making sure I was being good.grey_shrike_thrush_named_home_jackadgery_june 2019
Another Winter visitor to the garden are Golden Whistlersgolden_whistler_named_home_jackadgery_june 2019
Of course a monthly wrap wouldn’t be the same without the resident Eastern Yellow Robin who found a post to sit on while surveying the garden for a snack.eastern_yellow_robin_named_home_jacadgery_june 2019
Little Striated Thornbills are flying about the garden in the afternoonsstriated_thornbill_named_home_jackadgery_june 2019
The Rose Robins are still around as wellrose_robin_named_home_jacadgery_june 2019
The Agave looked lovely in the afternoon lightagave_garden_sun_named_home_jackadgery_june 2019
This is called Witches Broom it is on a small Eucalypt. witches_broom_garden_named_home_jackadgery_june 2019
The variety of plants that are growing on a palm in the garden is wonderful. At the front is an Elk Horn, behind it on the right is a Birds nest Fern. They are surrounded by Hares Foot Fern and to the left rear is Fishbone Fern. All of these plants have decided to grow among the palm’s trunk.palm_elkhorn_birdsnest_fern_haresfoot_fern_garden_named_home_jackadgery_june 2019
Nearby, a Jacaranda has a lovely growth of moss that cascades to the ground.moss_garden_named_home_jackadgery_june 2019
My mate Geoffs Iris has flowered. Always will bring back a memory.iris_purple_garden_named_home_jackadgery_june 2019
All around the place Lichen has sprung up as there has been showers of rain over the last part of the month enough to keep the garden happy and for some plants to emerge.lichen_named_home_jackadgery_june 2019
I love finding water drops. My besties place has had much more rain than here.cumquat_water_drop_garden_named_caniabajune 2019
These are the seed pods from an Eucalypt tree I found in Inverell.nut_eucalypt_tree_inverell_june 2019
I haven’t taken many photos of the Red-necked Wallabies that hang around my place. I caught this bloke with a mouth full of grass.red-necked_wallaby_named_home_jackadgery_june 2019
Late one afternoon at my besties, she called out to come over to where she was in the garden. She found a little Bandi Bandi going across a log heading for a safe place to spend the night.bandi_bandi_named_caniaba_june 2019
There appears to be lots of Wanderer Butterflies about at the moment. Found this one flying around the lane-ways of Lismore.wanderer_butterfly_flying_named_lismore_june 2019
Meanwhile there are Wanderers in my besties garden feeding on Echinacea flowers.wanderer_echanacia_flower_garden_named_caniaba_june 2019
One day we decided to head to the coast for lunch at the Ballina Beach Surf Club. Afterwards, after watching whales from the window while eating, we wandered up to the headland and watched the Humpback Whales cruising past. I bit of blow usually let me know where they were.humpback_whale_blow_named_ballina_headland_june 2019

I love it when they gave a wave.
humpback_whale_fin1_named_ballina_headland_june 2019
Managed to get some tail shots.humpback_whale_tail_splash2_named_ballina_headland_june 2019
but could never be focused on the right place when a Humpback breachedhumpback_whale_tail_splash1_named_ballina_headland_june 2019
Now for a bit of weird. Walking down a lane in Lismore we always look to see if this window has changed. I think the hand and flag on the right have been added.eclectic_window_wierd_named_lismore_june 2019

A stack of chairs in a window.
chairs_window_named_lismore_june 2019

One morning, the mist was settled in the valleys. I used to tell the kids that the mountains have captured the clouds.
great_dividing_range_cloud_june 2019

A bit of my playing around with photos. A Magpie on a steel post
magpie_post_art_named_inverell_june 2019
OK the sun is down so time for me to go.sunset_orange_named_caniaba_june 2019

I hope you have enjoyed a bit of a look at my June. The feature photo is a butterfly among the Zinnias in my besties garden.