Brave

THIS is a short story for The Daily Post prompt Brave.

In the early history of Australia, many a brave sailor with their wooden sail boats, made their way along the southern part of Australia known as the Limestone Coast on part of the Southern Ocean known as Bass Strait. These seas were treacherous and many a ship never reached their destination.

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The weather was often against the sailors, their crew, their passengers and cargo. There are approximately 638 known shipwrecks along the coastline, many which remain undiscovered.

The Shipwreck Coast
The Limestone coast of South Australian and the south west coast of Victoria is known as the Shipwreck Coast. This section of coastline is made up of cliffs, reef, islands and outcrops of rocks. In combination with the winds of the’ roaring forties’ and the often stormy seas, sailing these waters could be very dangerous. Along a 130 kilometre stretch of the Victorian coast from Port Fairy to Cape Otway alone there are over 80 shipwrecks.

‘I have seldom seen a more fearful section of coastline’, wrote Matthew Flinders, the explorer who first mapped the coast of Australia.”
(From http://www.australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/early-austn-shipwrecks)

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Despite the dangerous journey from South Australia to Victoria many a vessel sailed these water.

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There are many a wreck or part thereof still that can been seen even from the lookout points along the Great Ocean Road.

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Imagine the sight that the sailors of years gone by would have seen.

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If not for the lighthouses that were constructed. One of these was the Cape Otway Lighthouse which was built in 1848. Then the lighthouse known as the ‘Beacon of Hope’ and sits 90 metres above the ocean. Cape Otway Lighthouse is the oldest surviving lighthouse on mainland Australia and considered the most significant.
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See https://www.lightstation.com/

I hope you enjoyed a quick journey along the Limestone Coast where many a brave sailor and people lost their lives.
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Indoor Walkways, Hallways, Elevators

Another fabulous topic from Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge. My take on the topic are from a few places in our world. How are the Indoor walkway, Hallways Elevators in your world. See some other wonderful photos here

Just a train from Madrid to Paris
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A walkway in a church in Italy
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Under the Arena in Verona where the soldiers patrolled
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Where the Gladiators walked to enter the Arena in Verona. This one was armed with an umbrella
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A walkway going from the main building to the garden in the Grand Hyatt in Seoul
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The hallway to the Grand Ballroom, Grand Hyatt in Seoul
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Looking towards the front door at the Grand Hyatt in Seoul
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Lines and Angles: Grafton Bridge

For Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Lines and Angles I would like to show you the bridge in my town. The rail line is straight but the bridge has a number of bends, giving the local name of the Bendy Bridge. It was built in 1932 and the design is unique to Australia as it has a it has a railway line on the lower deck and the road is the upper deck. It used to open until the water main was built onto the structure and shipping stopped going up river, now the bridge no longer opens. There is another bridge being built along side the old bridge as in the mornings and afternoons there is quite a build up of traffic crossing the river. Large vehicles and buses have a hard time negotiating the bends and traffic coming in the opposite direction usually stop to allow the larger vehicles get around the bends.

A bit of the steel structure
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Some of the steel used came from Scotland
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The little office where the operator operated the controls to open the bridge.
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One of the bends of the bridge
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The walkway with the rail line on the left. There is another walkway on the other side. The crane on the right is where the new bridge is being built.
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The cranes used in the building of the new bridge
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Traces of the Past: The Bank

This time for Traces of the Past, I thought I would take you to my home town of Grafton. A relatively new place, Grafton was first settled by Europeans in 1849 and the City was established. There are still some buildings that have survived from the later part of the 19th Century. The CBC Bank is one that still stands. Built in 1877 from stone and has lace iron work. A very impressive building for its day. One of my favourite buildings.

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A bit of the entrance with the carving in the stone and the iron gates
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The circular carving in detail
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There are also some rectangular carvings as well170921_blog challenge_traces of the past_grafton bank_stone carrving_rectangle

The stone balustrades are starting to show their age
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Beautiful isn’t it? For more wonderful photos in Traces of the Past have a look at Lost in Translation

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Stones

Frank has set the photo challenge of Stones. I know I have posted these before but they are stones that represent a part of the history of Australia. Many years ago, the Indigenous people of the land, that I now call my place, used to trek through this land. They may have been following the seasons. Walking from the Mann River to the Clarence River to perhaps trade with the other peoples from the other parts of the Clarence Valley. Someone took the time to fashion a hand axe from the stones that I still find here. This stone axe fits perfectly in my hand and I would be able to use it today. The edge is very sharp.
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This stone is the one that would have been used to chip off the edge of the axe. Again a tool that fits very comfortably in my hand.
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Here is both together where you can see the edge of the axe
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Thanks for reading my Stones. The Indigenous culture is thousands of years old. I have no idea how old these tools are. European settlement in my area has been over 100 years. I am privileged to hold these tools knowing I have the past history living in my home. Thank you Frank for allowing me to tell the story.

Thursdays Special: Traces of the Past

Australia isn’t an old country. Settled in 1788, many of the buildings have gone and there is still some Traces of the Past.

I have, as in my last blog, gone back thousands of years. This time I have a bit of the architecture from the not too distant past.

Many of the buildings in Sydney and the surrounding settlements were made of sandstone. Sydney sandstone is a valuable building material now-a-days. This church is in Springwood in the the Blue Mountains which surround Sydney to the west.
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Another sandstone structure. A spire on a building in Newtown, Sydney
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A mix of building materials. Sandstone, brick and copper on the Trades Hall Center in the City.
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A copper dome and weather vane on a building in Newtown, Sydney
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Thursdays Special: Traces of the Past Y3-05

Traces of the Past
My little piece of history may be thousands of years old as the Aboriginal culture is the oldest culture in history. I discovered these artifacts on my property many years ago. On a walk with friends I first came upon the stone hand axe or cutting tool. The photos don’t really show the sharpness the edge. When I first picked the tool up, it fitted into my hand so wonderfully well.

The second discovery was made a while later. It is the stone that was used to chip off bits of stone to make the hand axe possibly. Again the smooth roundness of the back fitted into my hand perfectly.

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Have a look at the other wonderful photos from the past in the Lost in Translations blog

Black and White Sunday – Traces of the Past

It is great that some of the cars of yesterday still exist. Wouldn’t you love to drive this old Ford?

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The McKay Petrol engine made in Australia in around 1913 was used on farms for anything you could think of. The engine was running, you can see the wheel spinning in the photo.

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Here is the brochure for the engine

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