The old dairy window

Ludwig’s Monday Window 2 August

On a drive on the weekend, we came across this cute little building. There was a woman in her garden so I asked if I could take a few photos. She told us the history of the building. It was the dairy milking shed and had not been used for many many years and was in disrepair. She was going to have it pulled down but the bloke said it was worth doing a few repairs as a lot of it was still solid. He did a great job on the building and left the window as it was.

The wooden window was lifted and the ring on the bottom was hooked onto the chain to keep it open. I was going to open the window but it was heavy and I wasn’t sure it was going to work.

A bit fashionable

Debbie’s quotation inspired image

No other song could be suitable for this post

    “The seventeenth of March. In other words, spring. Desmond, people who think themselves smart, I mean those in the height of fashion, women or men – can they afford to wait any longer before buying their spring wardrobes?”.

    – Colette

Tales of a Distant Farm – a bit of history

Debbie’s One Word Sunday: History  

So the theme/prompt is History. I thought I would delve back into my history and re-post one of my first posts, some 2,790 posts ago in May 2012.

On my recent travels, I managed to visit a farm in the mountains behind Verona, Italy, in the Valpolicella Valley a well known wine growing region in Italy.

No, it wasn’t a winery I visited but a dairy. The dairy was very old and when I asked the owner how long the family had owned the farm (me in English/Italian – her in Italian/English – most comical conversation!!!) she shook her head and just said many many many grandfathers…..and perhaps it did look that way as well…..

Image

Behind those doors are many a good thing but more of that later.

Can you imagine running a dairy where your herd is kept in barns for 7 to 8 months of the year? The only time they get out onto pasture is in late Spring and Summer and the pasture they go to is quite well grassed.

Image

The yellow are a sort of Dandelion. Lake Garda is in the distance.

The conditions that the part of the herd I saw was rather boggy, but they weren’t all the milkers, just the calves and a few of the milkers. A shed nearby was still stacked with hay and covered.

Image

The milking bales were rather old but worked and it would take a while even though the herd was around sixty cows

Image

But the product that came from the milk – cheese – was some of the best cheese I have ever tasted. They make ten different types of cheese – all unpasteurised – which means they can only sell from the farm gate or at some markets, but what cheese!!! Of the eight I sampled there was only two that I didn’t really enjoy. The two year old mature cheese was so good as were the softer cheeses, some with added flavours…the chilli one was divine!!!

Image

The fresh cheese just made that morning

Image

The cheese room complete with mould.

The food produced from the farm was always value added and not much went to waste. Remember that doorway

Image

Yes THIS door.

Behind that door was an array of salami, some of which had also been haging for a number of years. The smell was surprisingly pleasant and the taste…juicy and tender, full of flavour.

Image

Just hangin’ ’round

Everyone on the farm just hung around together outside as well

Image

I did like to see that chooks are the same all around the world in how they view that anywhere you want to is where you can sit and lay an egg!!!!

Image

No I didn’t check to see if she had laid or was sitting on a clutch!!!

I hope you enjoyed my dairy farm visit as much as I did

Lines and Angles: Grafton Bridge

I am re-blogging this post for Debbie’s One Word Sunday Bridge https://travelwithintent.com/2020/08/16/bridge-forth-rail-bridge/

For Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge: Lines and Angles I would like to show you the bridge in my town. The rail line is straight but the bridge has a number of bends, giving the local name of the Bendy Bridge. It was built in 1932 and the design is unique to Australia as it has a it has a railway line on the lower deck and the road is the upper deck. It used to open until the water main was built onto the structure and shipping stopped going up river, now the bridge no longer opens. There is another bridge being built along side the old bridge as in the mornings and afternoons there is quite a build up of traffic crossing the river. Large vehicles and buses have a hard time negotiating the bends and traffic coming in the opposite direction usually stop to allow the larger vehicles get around the bends.

A bit of the steel structure
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Some of the steel used came from Scotland
170929_bandw_grafton bridge02

The little office where the operator operated the controls to open the bridge.
170929_bandw_grafton bridge04

One of the bends of the bridge
170929_bandw_grafton bridge03

The walkway with the rail line on the left. There is another walkway on the other side. The crane on the right is where the new bridge is being built.
170929_bandw_grafton bridge05
The cranes used in the building of the new bridge
170929_bandw_grafton bridge06

Black-&-White-Banner

The bathroom and the dunny

Cee’s Black % White Photo Challenge: Bathrooms/Outhouses

On a recent mini holiday, we went to Inverell. Inverell has a Pioneer Village which has building and artifacts from the bygone era.

I though as I was back in time I should take some photos in black and white. Here are a couple of photos from inside the houses as they would have been in the 1800’s.

This is the bathroom of one house
190705_blog_challenge_blackandwhite_bathroom_outhouse_pioneer_villiage_inverell
Out the back was of course the outhouse or dunny as they are called in Australia 190705_blog_challenge_blackandwhite_bathroom_outhouse_pioneer_villiage_inverell1

Discovery

The Ragtag Daily Prompt Thursday: Discovery

Laying there
upon the sea floor
exposed by tides
not alone
with the rest
of her kind
a chance
discovery
Look, I say
there…..
can you see?
Now encrusted
with age
she tells tales
of long ago
of friends
long gone
of battles
and life
now in her
final resting place
she says
look at me.

180223_encrusted_canon

Verona Arena

The Photo a Week Challenge from Nancy: From Above and Below

The Verona Arena, built in the first century,  is an open-air Roman amphitheater still in use today.  The Arena is one of the best-preserved ancient structures worldwide. These  stones have seen everything from gladiator games to rock concerts, from medieval jousts to Puccini operas.

From above
181120_blog challenge_from_above_below_arena_verona

“The place held over 20,000 people in its heyday, hosting festivals that would draw visitors from all over. It was a complex and demanding entertainment industry, powered by the labor of hundreds of slaves in the underground tunnels. Grandiose stage sets would be erected in the central space. The elliptical shape gives the space excellent acoustics.

There were processions, circus acts, dancing and music, but, above all, the citizens came to see blood sports. Fierce wild animals from faraway places in the empire were brought in to be hunted, and condemned prisoners were executed in bloody and inventive ways. The feature presentation was always a gladiator show, in which two trained combatants would fight one another to the death. The word “arena” means sand, and it refers to the sand that covered the floor of the ring to absorb the blood spilled during the fights.”
https://theculturetrip.com/europe/italy/articles/a-brief-history-of-the-verona-arena/

From below – a tunnel leading to the outside
181120_blog challenge_from_above_below_arena2_verona
I wonder how many people have walked this corridor below the Arena181120_blog challenge_from_above_below_arena3_verona

Mountain with a past

The Photo for the Week challenge: Mountains

What is a mountain with a past you ask. The mountain I chose for Bren’s photo challenge #17 is that well know mountain with a historical past.
Going back in time to 79AD some people were going about their daily life when the ground rumbled and suddenly an explosion sent ash and hot lava raining down upon the people and  “buried the cities of Pompeii, Oplontis, and Stabiae under ashes and lapilli and the city of Herculaneum under a mudflow.” (https://www.britannica.com/place/Vesuvius) The last eruption was in 1944 and the volcano is still active. Vesuvius is very closely monitored today.

Yes, I chose Mt Vesuvius. This is the view of Vesuvius that people of Pompeii would have seen although before the eruption, the mountainside was forested with Oak and Chestnut trees.
181112_blog challenge_mountain_vesuvius_pompeii

This is the view over the Bay of Naples, across the Plain of  Campania and Naples to Vesuvius
181112_blog challenge_mountain_vesuvius_naples

 

 

Columns

The word prompt from Terri for the Photo for the Week: Columns

Columns from Pompeii
180614_blog challenge_columns_vertical lines_pompeii

Columns in a colonnade in Bologna
180614_blog challenge_columns_vertical lines_collonade_bologna

In a church in Bologna
180614_blog challenge_columns_vertical lines_church_bologna

The fabulous columns in the Sagrada Familia Barcelona
180614_blog challenge_columns_vertical lines_sagrada familia_barcelona

 

Sunday Stills: Objects Over One Hundred Years Old

The photo challenge from Terri: Objects Over One Hundred Years Old

I wondered what I would like to have in this post. I randomly clicked on my holiday folder and came up with the village of Luss on the western side of Loch Lomond. The sign as we entered the village said “the prettiest town in Scotland” Just a couple of photos as it was raining the day we were there.

The village has some of the loveliest cottages
180820_blog challenge_over 100 years old_luss_scotland_cottage1

I think the owner of this cottage likes flowers
180820_blog challenge_over 100 years old_luss_scotland_cottage2

Isn’t this stone wall amazing
180820_blog challenge_over 100 years old_luss_scotland_stone wall