The Waterhole

The word prompt from Amanda at Life Amazing: Pools or Ponds

I have been meaning to post a bit about my property for a while. One day it will be whole post. For the moment, thanks to Amanda, here is a bit about the waterhole or pool on my place. It always has water and I have never seen it dry. I went for a bit of a bush walk a few weeks ago, before the rains came, just to see how the environment and and birds and animals had been coping with a lack of rain.

This is how the waterhole or pool looks when there has been a bit of rain.
181010_blog challenge_pool_pond_durranbah_waterhole_water

This is what I found. A small pool behind some gravel and leaves.
181010_blog challenge_pool_pond_durranbah_waterhole_dry

To my surprise, the waterhole was filled with the sounds of birds. This is the only water source down this part of my place so the birds were there in numbers. A tiny Scarlet Honeyeater makes the waterhole look big.
181010_blog challenge_pool_pond_scarlet honeyeater
A White-throated Honeyeater enjoyed a drink.181010_blog challenge_pool_pond_white throated honeyeater
A yellow-faced Honeyeater was joined by some Fuscous Honeyeaters. There were so many Fuscous Honeyeaters that I couldn’t count them.181010_blog challenge_pool_pond_yellow faced honeyeater_fuscous honeyeaters

This is a small amount of the birds that were there. The air was filled with bird song. A lovely way to spend the afternoon, sitting and watching until the mosquitoes sent me on the track back home.

This is August 2018

Not a terribly exciting month for photos as I have been unwell with a cold which is not going away. I decided to do two or maybe more posts about August, one is a fairly large post which will be done soon. At least being unwell allows me time to sit at the computer to sort photos and do stuff that I put off as I have lots to do outside before the weather warms up, although this Winter had been unseasonably warm.

Let’s get started. A few mornings have been slightly foggy. One morning, the early morning fog made the bush look quite surreal.
durranbah_fog_forest_named_home_aug 2018

Some days the clouds were in shapes that made me just stop and look.
clouds_named_home_aug 2018

I am glad this Red-necked Wallaby stopped and looked before hopping across the road in front of me.
red necked wallaby_named_home_aug 2018

A day was spent at an event in town called Wings and Wheels held at the South Grafton Airfield. It was great to see the Grey Ferguson tractors lines up. This one looked like mine.
ferguson_tractor_named_grafton_aug 2018

One day out and about, we came across this most colourful and crazy garden. Lots of ideas for Cee’s Odd Ball photo challenge that’s for sure.
garden_crazy_named_alstonville_aug 2018

My bestie said it was time for the old wheelbarrow to get a succulent garden. Didn’t she do a great job? All the plants came from pots around the house and garden.
succulant_garden_wheelbarrow_named_home_august 2018

The hanging geraniums are always in flower.
geranium_flower_named_home_aug 2018

We doing things in my besties garden when we felt that someone was looking at us.
cow_peeking_named_caniaba_aug 2018

Here is the biggest Brush Turkey from a nearby town, Kyolge.
big brush turkey_named_kyogle_aug 2018

Getting home from a drive, the chook decided to detail the car, removing all sorts of insects from the front of my car.
chook_car_named_home_aug 2018

It is nesting time. I wondered what was going on with the mat on the verandah. The White-browed Treecreeper, normally hopping on vertical tree trunks, gathering nesting material.
white throated treecreeper_rug_named_home_aug 2018

A Spotted Pardalote was foraging among the vines.
spotted pardalote_named_home_aug 2018

The Welcome Swallows have been nesting in the verandah at my besties new place for years. They have started building their nests too. They are always together.
welcome swallowa_named_caniaba_aug 2018

A young King Parrot morphing from juvenile to adult
king parrot_morph_named_home_aug 2018

Checking out the tree tops, an Australian Raven, surveys the scene.
australian raven_tree top_named_home_aug 2018

A Pied Currawong found the berries on a Murraya irresistible.
currawong_berry_named_home_aug 2018

The rather prehistoric looking Noisy Friarbird love Grevilleas.
friarbird_red grevillea_named_caniaba_aug 2018

Eastern Spinebills also love Grevilleas.
eastern spinebill_honey gem grevillea_named_home_aug 2018

The blue black is lovely as a contrast to the rest of their colours. You can see why it is called a Spinebill.
eastern spinebill_red grevillea_named_home_aug 2018

The Galah just loved walking among the grass seeds snacking as he went.
galah_named_caniaba_aug 2018

I went down to the bottom part of my property to check on the waterhole. While I was there the activity of birds was quite amazing. A huge flock of Fuscous Honeyeaters were darting everywhere.
honeyeater_named_home_august 2018

One afternoon, the Moon looked so fabulous against the blue sky. I love our Moon.
moon_named_home_august 2018

Well there you go. A quick look at my month of August. Thanks for stopping by. Leave me a comment which will cheer me up no end.

January….some excitement so far…

Yes. There has been some excitement around my place so far this month. Just sitting on the verandah having a cuppa one morning, the usual bird song od Spangled Drongos, Friarbirds, Fig Birds, Kookaburras and Ravens, just to name a few, changed. There were a few small birds whizzing around the bush near the house as well as a couple of birds who were a bit bigger. But more of the birds later.

The flowers in the garden have had a bit of a lift with some rain at the start of the month. Prior to that I was feeling like the bad parent, having not much water in the dam to do a full garden watering, so I was having to select which plants I think could survive the dry a bit better than others. My best bird attractor, the Honey Gem Grevillea, hasn’t the flowers it normally has but still has bought a few birds in to the garden.

Other plants have stepped up and have made sure the butterflies have somewhere to visit. The Speckled Line-blue enjoyed a rest on the Hibiscus

butterfly_crop_named_home_jan 2015

While the Lemon Migrant seemed to prefer the red flowers

lemon migrant_named_home_jan 2015

The Cassia has been quite spectacular this year with its drooping bunches of flowers seemingly cascading from the branches attracting bees. The buzzing of the bees made it sound like the Cassia was covered with bees but there was only a handful of big fat bees.

bee native_crop_named_home_jan 2015

In the bush and around the garden, a little native plant has appeared. I have seen a few before but the dry then the rain seemed to make them grow in many spots in the garden as well as in the bush. The little yellow flower is about 5 to 8mms.

yellow native flower_named_home_jan 2015

The Duranta has bunches of flowers which are followed by small orange berries. The variegated leaves are a favourite of the Satin Bowerbirds. Some small birds like to drink from the small purple flowers as well.

purple flower_crop_named_home_jan 2105

The Mistletoe Bird was hopping around the Duranta looking for bits of nesting materials as well as examining the flowers.

mistletoe bird_female_named_home_jan 2015

When it got a bit too hot, we went down to the river for a soak. On the way back home we came across a Black Faced Cuckoo Shrike peeking out from behind a Bottlebrush

black-faced cuckoo shrike_named_crop_eatonsville_jan 2014

On the road a group of birds scattered as the car approached. The group of Rainbow Bee-eaters flew about the trees, occasionally resting long enough to get a few quick photos in the fading light.

rainbow bee eater02_named_jackadgery_jan 2015

You can see why the are Rainbow Bee-eaters!

rainbow bee eater01_named_jackadgery_jan 2015

Meanwhile, back at home, the Scarlet Honeyeater was hanging on as best she could to get a snack.

scarlett honeyeater_named_home_jan 2015

The Yellow-faced Honeyeaters have been here for a while now since I first saw one a couple of years ago. I love their yellow faces.

yellow faced honeyeater_named_home_jan 2015

The Restless Flycatchers also have made a home here in Summer. They were one of the first birds that came here when I first started to live in the bush.

satin flycatcher_named_crop_home_jan 2015

The Rufous Whistler is singing in the bush, but on this day also dropped in to the garden for a visit.

rufous whistler01_young_named_home_jan 2015

OK. Remember at the start I said I had some exciting things happening. One of the new birds I have seen this year has been the Fuscous Honeyeater. I always get excited when a new bird appears. Of course the found the Honey Gem.

fuscous honeyeater01_named_home_jan 2015

The Brown Honeyeater discovered another Grevillea in another part of the garden. This is also a favourite of the Scarlet Honeyeaters as the bigger birds don’t drop in for some nectar here very often. This is the first time the Brown Honeyeater has been seen at my place as well.

fuscous honeyeater_crop_named_home_jan 2015

Well I have to fly…

fuscous honeyeater02_named_crop_home_jan 2015

….but not before the most exciting news of all. One quite rare visitor to my place has been a Regent Honeyeater. When something like this happens a lot of people like to know so it is always good to let the folk at Birdlife Aust know when you come across something special.

regent honeyeater03_named_crop_home_jan 2015

Many thanks to Twitter mates @DOCTOR_Dave and @caroproberts for their help in identifying the birds and butterflies I had trouble identifying as well as everyone else who also helped.

I hope I get some more new birds at my place in 2015 to add to the 88 I have already discovered.

See ya