Raspberry Lookout 1 March 2020

Raspberry Lookout. One of my favourite places to go and have a picnic and chill for a while. I have featured the lookout in past posts but never in a whole post.

We went from my place up the Gibraltar Range to see what had happened there since October 2019. The fires had burnt through there and eventually came down the mountains to my place. As it is a wonderful place to see, I could not bring myself to drive along the highway to Raspberry as the memories of such a special place for me would have had me in tears I reckon. Couldn’t go there anyway as the highway was closed until late January. The amount of very big trees that had burnt down and fallen across the road was amazing. They are still removing trees and fixing protective road barriers.

It has taken me until now to be able to write and show you the photos from the lookout. This is just Raspberry Lookout not the drive up or down the mountain. As they were working there wasn’t the opportunity to stop. I was very heartened by the recovery that had taken place so come on, lets have a look around Raspberry Lookout.

This is the view from Raspberry Lookout. You can see where the fires had been. Some parts of the countryside were patches of rainforestview_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
In case you were uncertain what to look for, here’s a bit of a close up. Usually this is lush forest and you cannot see the bare ground. Some of the gully lines contained species of rainforest plants. There weren’t many birds to be seen or hear. It was eerily silent.forest_burnt_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
This ridge line is showing signs of recovery. The ridge behind is what it will look like again.fire_scarred_trees_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
One of the first to appear after a fire are the fungi. There were a number of these tiny orange fungi dotted through the bush.fungi_small_orange_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
This fungus was sending a message of love and hopefungi_heart_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
The colours of the new foliage is amazing. From a burnt stump life springs forth.bush_leaves_new_fire_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
Everywhere flowers appeared. I must confess we did go over the fence and scramble about the gravelly soil looking around at the wonderful flowers and whatever else we found. Most of the flowers are quite small up to 15mm or half an inch.flower_yellow_small_native_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
This was the first flower I found as it was right beside the car when I opened the door.flower_pink_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
So many varieties of Pea Plants that seemed to grow out of the rocks.pea flower_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
Along with flowers come the insects. Not only bees pollinate flowers, wasps do as well.flower_purple_wasp_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
A Blue-banded Bee really enjoyed getting right into the flowerflower_purple_blue banded bee_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
A Teddy Bear Bee was moving from flower to flower quickly.bee_flying_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
Another wasp on a Billy Buttons flower. It was lovely to see small clumps of Billy Button flowers scattered throughout the lookout.flower_billy buttons_yellow_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
A wonderful find was a Nobbi sunning on a rock. This male has his breeding colours on. They are distantly related to Bearded Dragons. Not long after I took this shot he was off a great speed. When I looked in book to try and identify who he is, the book said that Nobbi’s run fast. Well they certainly do!nobbi_lizard_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
As there was a good amount of rainfall in February, the sound of water rushing was an unusual sound at the lookout. Normally you can’t see this waterfall cascading down the mountain and plunging into the stream below.waterfall_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020
I was so glad that this old tree stump survived the fire with a little bit of scorching. The “mouth” is the notch they cut with an axe to slot a board in and cut higher up the tree. It would take four or five people holding hands around the tree to gauge the size of this old beauty.  I would miss his spooky face when I head up the mountain from my place to Raspberry Lookout.tree_old_axe cut_named_raspberry lookout_march 2020

Thanks for coming with me and having a picnic at Raspberry Lookout.
The featured photo is from 2017

Light the night

Nancy’s Photo a Week Challenge: Light the Night

Natural light or man made light? You can be the judge.

Our Moon gives a lovely light at night171221_blog challenge_darkness and light_moon05

full moon_6

moonlight_water_rain_caniaba_feb 2019
A bit of bothmoon_full_night_house_palms_named_caniaba_jan 2019
Fire lights the night190128_blog_challenge_sunday_stills_night_fire_twirler3
A party boat glows on the bay170913_blog challenge_dark_blue boat
A man, a torch and a Brush-tailed Possumpossum_cassia_night_named_home_jackadgery_jan 2019
Big Ben has its own lights181216_time_square_comes_a_time_clock_big ben_night
A man, a car light and an owlbarn owl_night_binna burra_april 2018
A man. a woman, a torch and a Moon Flower171019_blog challenge_glow_moon flower

Durranbah – Fire Recovery part1

I have been out and about but not far into the bush as there are limbs falling and the ground is quite wet now so some burnt trees could still topple. These are in the area around the house. This area was just burnt ground with some blackened timber. The unburnt leaves have fallen since the fire went through on the 6th December.

Some of the plants I know what they are and have named. I am going cross-eyed trying to find all the plants in my books. Many of the flowers are small some up to 10mm or half an inch. There is quite a few photos.

The start of a Native Wisteria emerging from the soilplant_native wisteria_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
Fungi were the first plants to appear. The Finger Fungi is small and struggling. There’s a bit of Lichen too.fungi_finger_small_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
The Golden Lily is showing as bright dots of yellow through the bush. The flowers are 20 to 40mm and in places they are in clumps of flowers. There are about five buds waiting to open herenative flower_golden lily_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020

The Lomandras are in clumps or individual plants and all are flowering
native flower_lomandra1_clump_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020

The Lomandra flowers are tiny balls on a tall spike emerging from the tough strappy leaves
native flower_lomandra2_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
A different Lomandra.native flower_lomandra3_blueish_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
Not sure what this plant isplant_growth1_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
A small group of plantsplants_growth2_clump_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
I should know what this plant is but cannot remembernative flower_unknown_clump_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
Some plants emerge from the roots that survived the fire. This could be a shrub to small tree a Cheese Tree possibly.plant_growth2_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
The growth surrounding the burnt trunk. A lot of Australian plants start life red then turn green as they mature.tree_growth1_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
Another hardy Eucalypt grows. They are fire hardy plants and there is a sort of root, a lignotuber at the base of the tree that conserves energy and when it’s time, the tree will commence growing. Many species can re-sprout from buds under their bark.plant_growth_eucalypt1_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
Another tiny flower. These are on slender stalks and in clumps of tiny white flowers. native_flower_white_tall_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
This is a ground cover that spreads along the forest floor. Bright dots of purple catch your eye.native_flower_purple_ground cover_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
These yellow flowers are ones the Native Stingless Bees love. Again around 10mm across.native flower_yellow_tall_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
Almost a clover like flower but opens up as you can see in the backgroundnative flower_white_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
There are lots of these purple flowers on tall spikes and multiple flowers.native flower_purple_tall_cluster_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
I think this may belong to the pea family. So pretty with many flowers along the stalknative flower_purple_pea_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
Lots of clumps of these flowers and bees buzzing around.native flower_pink_yellow_fringe_bee_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020
A close-up of the flowers in the above clump.native flower_pink_yellow_fringe_fire_recovery_home_jackadgery_feb 2020

If anyone knows the names of any of the flowers or plants please let me know.

Smoking: a thing of the past

Debbies Six Word Saturday

The fire and smoking log are no more

tree_log_water_named_home_jackadgery_jan 2020

For those who haven’t been following my Six Word Saturday saga, here is a recap

One day I will stop smoking

Fifteen days later I’m still smoking

The fire’s smoke darken the sky

 

Firelight

Beckys square photo challenge: Light

20200112_blog challenge_light_fire

Come on over to Becky’s and join in the fun
Here’s the rule:
All you really need remember about this photographic challenge is that a square is a rectangle with four equal sides!
Yes the photo format is Square. Look on your camera setting before you get totally inspired and set it to 1:1 There you have it Square Format. If you forget crop your image to Square

Inferno

Pic and Word Challenge #214 – Inferno

The helicopters
give warning
The inferno
is about
helicopters_two_durranbah_blog_fire_post_dec 2019
Look
thick smoke
rising
pack and gosmoke_house_close_durranbah_blog_fire_post_dec 2019
The inferno
descended
swept by winds
escapesmoke_lilydale_durranbah_blog_fire_post_dec 2019
Orange sunsets
tell a tale
fear running
the inferno191023_blog_challenge_sunset_tree_fire_orange

Also Ragtag Daily Prompt Saturday: Hope

This afternoons rain solved this problem (or I have finally stopped smoking)

Debbies Six Word Saturday

 

log_burning_ironbark_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020

Yes, for those who have been playing along since early December, a what I would have called a tropical storm happened this afternoon (11th Jan for those elsewhere in the world) I am wet and happy

 

The Recovery of Durranbah – New life part one

It has been six weeks since the fire devastated my place. Today was the first time I have been able to get about my property and see the extent of the damage the fire has done. I went mainly to check the fences as they are the things that have been severely impacted by fire.

The best thing was that I didn’t find any large animals that had died from the fire. I didn’t go poking around in burnt logs and under things so smaller animals and reptiles may have not survived.

I did find the recovery of plants starting to commence.
new_growth_grass_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020

A Eucalypts lignotuber sends new growth from the ground. I love the red colour.
new_growth_ground_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020
A burnt tree sprouts new growth from its trunk.
new_growth_tree_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020
Early signs are often red gradually turning green.tree_new_growth_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020
This gold bummed ant was very protective of its tree. After a while it actually leapt onto the camera lensant_tree_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020
Other ants were carrying treasures back to the nestant_ground_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020
I did find the Bower Birds burnt bower which was near to my house. the bower_bower bird_blue_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020
His blue treasures to impress the females a bit charred and molten.bower_bower bird_blue_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020
Some people have asked how did the waterhole fare. The Lomandras in the water course have all started to sprout.new_growth_lomandra_waterhole_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020
The rain on Christmas Day filled the waterhole and it still has a good amount of water. I am not too sure about the quality of the water. On the left under the fallen Brush Box tree is the rock I sit on to watch and photograph the birds. On the right hand side that tree has fallen across the track I use to get down to the waterhole. The rocky gully where the water comes into the waterhole has lots of trees over it but the small water hole up there a bit has water as well. The Powerful Owls weren’t around much to my disappointment.waterhole_trees_water_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020
This is what the water hole looked like
waterhole_named_home_oct 2018
Dragonflies were flitting around one of the dams near the house.
dragonfly_dam_home_jackadgery_jan 2020
I was pleased to see the White-winged Chough family patrolling through the bush. It looks like they have had a good year as there was around three chicks. I counted eleven birds. Last year when I saw a flock there were seven. Choughs are quite good at enticing other Choughs from other family groups into their family.white-winged choughs_bush_walking_home_jackadgery_jan 2020
I was dismayed to see the big Ironbark tree still on fire. It will be a while until this tree stops burning. It is surrounded by a big burnt area so I am not concerned about it getting out of control. Unfortunately my tracks through the bush have so many trees over them I am unable to get anywhere near it and if I did I have no idea how I would be able to cut through the log to separate the burning bit from the rest of the tree. The tree is at least one meter in diameter.log_burning_ironbark_burnt_fire_home_jackadgery_jan 2020

So when I am next able to get about the property, I’ll write again about the recovery of Durranbah. I probably shouldn’t have walked as far as I did. I hurt my back a few weeks ago and am starting to feel better. I did come back to the house, have a shower, a bit of lunch and then went to bed for a few hours. Still am a bit sore still but the constant showers for the last three hours has been lovely. Not much rain I think but steady soaking rain has made me feel a lot better.

For Cee’s On the Hunt for Joy Challenge – Get Outside

LPM – Photo Adventure – Rural Life