The colour is gone

The Bird Weekly Photo Challenge: Birds in Black and White

I thought I had already contributed to Lisa’s photo challenge and looking through my posts I can see that I have written quite a number of posts with a similar theme. I will have to dig into the archives for this one so sorry if you have seen some of these before

Here’s a short song that I discovered many many years ago. I hope you can enjoy it as much as I do.

The Pink Bloodwood Tree

I was intending to write about some of the trees on my place this year. Waiting for trees to flower, produce gum nuts and being there when they do, has been a failure on my part. I put some Pink Bloodwood nuts, which I photographed a while ago, in a post and a few people were interested about the nuts and the trees. Here is the gum nut photo I posted of the urn shaped nut which are10 – 20mm in length and 8 – 16mm wide.

Here is one of the many Pink Bloodwood trees, Corymbia intermedia, which grows on my property. This one is just down the hill from my house. Pink Bloodwood trees can reach 20–30 m (65–100 ft) in height with a 10–20 m (35–65 ft) spread. The scent from the blossoms is quite strong when the Bloodwood trees flower between December and March.

As you can see, Pink Bloodwood trees have a distinctive bark when compared to the other trees in the bush behind.

Why are the called Bloodwood trees did you say? When there is a change in weather or damage to the bark or growth of the tree, particularly when the tree is flowering, they exude sap which can look similar to blood.

This sap is a food source for Gliders, Squirrel Gliders, Yellow-bellied Gliders and the Gliders I know I have here, Sugar Gliders and Feather Tail Gliders. Gliders have been seen by researchers biting and chewing the bark to get the sap to run out and licking the sap. I am sure other possums, insects and animals would enjoy the sap as well.

The sap running down the tree can resemble globules of blood. The sap hardens in the sun and sticks to the bark. The First Nations people of Australia are said to have used the sap to treat wounds, burns and sores.

I have not seen the sap do this before. A series of strings clinging to the bark was a fascinating find.

The flowers have a distinct habit where the flowers are in bunches of seven on the end of the branchlet. The flowers are 20mm in diameter and mainly occur on the top and higher branches of the tree.

Often the bees can be heard buzzing away attracted by the flowers scent as are many of the Honeyeaters. The Blue-faced Honeyeaters came in numbers to feast on the flowers nectar.

Then, almost just like that, the flowers die leaving the fruits behind which have closed valves encasing the seeds which open after a short while to spread and drop to the forest floor.

This is not before seed eating birds come to eat the seeds from the nuts in the tree like this Silvereye.

Then the gum nuts fall to the forest floor and you can now go back to the start of the post where this story began.

Drama

Debbie’s One Word Sunday: Drama

Where is the
drama?
is it
in the flowers?

Is it
in the air?
always a drama
somewhere

Perhaps a drama
on a post
drama
trivial to most

Not just
the birds
where a drama
resides

Oh the drama
where would we
be
without a drama

Olive

The word prompt from CitySonnet: Olive

There are a few birds that come around my place that have lovely olive coloured feathers. The featured bird is a Figbird.
This one is actually an Olive-backed Oriel
olive backed oriel_bird bath_named_home_oct 2017
The little White-throated Honeyeaterswhite throated honeyeaters_named_home_april 2016
Blue-faced Honeyeaterblue faced honeyeater_named_home_sept 2104
A Silvereyesilvereye_honeygem grevillea_named_home_may 2018

Blue #30 – Collecting material for building a nest

This months square challenge from Becky: Blue

Well here is the second last day for Becky’s #Blue #JulySquares photo challenge. Why not get a favourite photo with a bit of blue crop it square and show us what you have and join the Square Gang.

This one is also for Debbies Six Word Saturday challenge

On Saturday while sitting on the verandah and having a cuppa, a Blue-faced Honeyeater just flew into the front garden and landed on the ground. Most unusual for them to be on the ground. I wondered why and then he looked up and flew off. This is one of the photos of a Blue-faced Honeyeater gathering nesting material.

190730_blog_challenge_blue_blue_faced_honeyeater_nest_material

 

 

 

 

Blue

The prompt for the Weekly Prompts Photo Challenge: Blue
Agapanthus flowerblue agapanthus_named_home_dec 2014
Blue-faced Honeyeaterblue-faced honeyeater01_home_named_oct 2014

The blues of an Australian landscape
grafton_fog_named_june 2014
Blue Triangle Butterflyblue triangle butterfly_wings open_named_binna burra_jan 2018
A Blue-banded Bee in a Blue Ginger flower180327_before and after_blue banded bee_blue ginger

Superb Fairy Wren
181126_blog challenge_blue_superb fairy wren

Just a blue bottle and a splash of paint
blue bottle_bologna_named_oct 2015
Of course nothing is bluer than the sky190411_blog_challenge_blue_sky

Birds Around My Neighbourhood

Two photo challenges caught my eye today.

Lens-artists: Around the Neighbourhood

Jenns: Feathered Friends

Come for a quick walk around my neighbourhood. There is my dead end gravel road which is about three kilometers long which has an intersection with another gravel road which is paved about sixteen kilometers from my place. It goes from the highway to a long way away, perhaps fifty kilometers.

Lets get going.

The Noisy Friarbird will often let others know we are about
noisy friarbird_tree_named_home_nov 2018
Listen for a chip chip and look at the tree trunks to see a White-throated Treecreeper scouring the bark for an insect or twowhite throated treecreeper_named_home_oct 2018

The lovely face of a Blue-faced Honeyeater
blue faced honeyeater_honey gem_grevillea_named_home_oct 2018

You might hear the wings of the Eastern Spinebill before you see one zoom past
eastern spinebill_grevillea_named_home_july 2018

The Pied Butcherbirds song will fill the forest as we walk along
pied butcher bird05_chain saw_named_home_july 2018

We may see a Jackie Winter sitting on a fence
jackie winter_named_home_june 2018
Lovely little Eastern Yellow Robins will be chip chip chipping seemingly endlesslynorthern yellow robin_named_home_june 2018

Of course the familiar sounds of Kookaburras will resound around the bush
kookaburra_named_home_oct 2017

Small Brown Honeyeaters will be silently having a snack on a Bottlebrush
brown honeyeater_named_home_august 2017

A flash of colour and a Spotted Pardelote will fly by
spotted pardalote_named_home_june 2017
A Forest Kingfisher, a sudden flash like a blue jewel, as he flies through the bushforest kingfisher_close_named_home_march 2017

The unmistakable squawking of Rainbow Lorikeets as they argue about whose branch it is will get your attention
rainbow-lorikeets_named_home_dec-2016

The beautiful song of a Rufous Whistler will kep you spell bound for ages
rufous-whistler_named_home_dec-2016

A whistle, a flash of red, the smallest honeyeater is unmistakable in the bush
scarlet-honeyeater_singing_named_home_nov-2016

High in the tree, the resident Square-tailed Kite will keep an eye on you
square-tailed-kite01_nest_named_home_nov-2016

While overhead it’s mate will soarsquare-tailed-kite_flying_named_home_sept-2016
Up the road a bit, some Crimson Rosellas have a snack on the horses feedcrimson-rosellas_named_home_sept-2016

What’s that chatter chatter chatter? I hear you say. The Grey-crowned Babblers walk about the forest floor snacking on unsuspecting insects talking about their day
grey-crowned-babbler_named_home_aug-2016

More jewels in the sky as the Rainbow Bee-eaters gather
rainbow-bee-eaters01_named_home_aug-2016

Another remarkable song and bright yellow of the Golden Whistler will make you stop and listen
golden whistler01_named_home_may 2015

Musk Lorikeets can be seen as they feast on the nectar of Pink Euodias
musk lorikeet02_named_home_feb 2015
The largest bird of prey, a Wedged-tailed Eagle on the lookout for an unsuspecting wallaby or animal, will sit silent until we get to closewedged tailed eagle01_named_home_feb 2015

A bit more whistling heralds that we are near some King Parrots
king parrot_home_crop_named_dec 2013
A strange metallic sound draws our attention to the iridescent and distinctive tail shape of the wonderfully named Spangled Drongo spangled drongo_home_named_oct 2014

A Satin Bowerbird who is similarly coloured to a Drongo will be in the bush sometimes finding food
satin bowerbird_male_home_named_june 2016
or finding sticks or blue stuff to decorate and construct his Bowerthe-bower_named_home_feb-2017

Thanks for dropping by and having a bit of a walk around my neighbourhood. I hope you had a good time.