This is August 2022

A bit of a quiet month for me. The days have been lovely so I have been in the garden or wandering about town – actually a quick coffee and shopping. There was a few days of almost rain. Enough to discourage taking the camera out.

As the nights have been quite cold, a lot of my days were spent with chainsaw in hand and gathering firewood, then splitting the rounds for the fire. This is a good bit of exercise plus pushing a full wheelbarrow of the split wood up to the house.

I have acquired a new friend but more about her later.

Here is your August song to help you get through this post

I have had some feral cats in my yard during the month so I set my live capture trap with a can of cat food in the hope to get one. I checked the trap and it hadn’t gone off but the food was gone. I immediately suspected rats so out with the smaller live trap just in case it wasn’t a Ratus ratus.

Here is the little one I trapped. It isn’t a Black Rat but not sure what it is, so I let it out in the bush nearby. Isn’t it cute?

OK lets start with a few flowers. The Grafton Regional Art Gallery is finally getting the gardens together. Some bulbs popped up and looked so good.

A house nearby has some lovely Hibiscus

I am not sure what flower this one is. It looks like a Purple Violet but the leaves are different. This just popped up in a new garden bed we made a few years ago.

This Winter is the first time the Giant Salvia (my name, not sure what they are really called) have flowered. The plant has really big leaves and is now over two metres tall.

This year being wet and now dryish has confused a lot of the plants in the garden. The Grevilleas and Bottlebrush have been flowering nearly all year now. The birds are loving the flowers and this pink Bottlebrush is a favourite of the small birds.

The small Nectarine and Peach trees have had a blossom bonanza as well. The bees are all over the trees.

The flowers look so lovely.

On one of my days in town, I decided to have a bit of a photo session of the Grafton Goal, some photos I have already posted (Thursday Doors) and there will be some more over the next week or so.

The crown above the gates looks like it has been recently refurbished. It is quite a grand Victorian building.

Walking around town, I spied a teapot on a fence. It was near a cafe and I forgot to ask if they put it there to attract customers.

Also just sitting there was a Pied Currawong in my garden. It is sitting on a dead palm that didn’t survive the drought at the end of the last decade. Pied Currawongs come down from the mountains when the weather gets cold.

Last week a couple of Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos decided to stop over for a rest and a snack. This one just seemed to sit in the tree and didn’t do much at all.

Whereas it’s friend decided to gnaw at a tree. They listen for grubs in the tree and then commence to dig the grub out.

Stopping long enough to admire it’s handiwork.

and then back into hacking into the tree. By the time the Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo finished there wasn’t much tree left but it is still standing. I am waiting for a strong wind to see if it comes crashing down. Luckily it is not in a part of the bush where I walk.

I have a number of bird baths scattered around the garden but some birds, like these female Satin Bowerbirds seem to like this rusty old drum

Yes the Whipbirds are still coming into the garden to forage. One day I hope to be outside and in a spot to get a photo and not through a window

The King Parrots are still around as well but not in the same numbers as last month or earlier this month. This female King Parrot sits outside of my office and ever now and then knocks on the window to get my attention to let me know the feeder is empty.

Remember I mentioned I have a new girlfriend? Well this is her. I came home from town one day and noticed a Brush Turkey walking across the garden and head down into the bush. I have never had Brush Turkeys on my place before so this was strange to say the least. Over the next few days I saw her in the garden sometimes pecking under the bird feeders getting spilt seed.

Over the weeks, she has gotten used to me and now hangs around me when I am in the garden or splitting firewood in the hope I’ll turn up insects. When I came home from town this afternoon, there she was on the verandah so she is becoming bolder.

I suspect she has been hand reared and has been dumped. People often dump birds and animals out my way but this is a rather strange one to say the least. As she looks like staying around I have named her Betty – Brush Turkey ➡ BT ➡ Betty

I saw a few Pink Galahs on a patch of lawn in nearby town, Lawrence. It was a case of “Hey bud, no paparazzi” as they walked down the hill

One day I looked at the sky and saw these clouds, grabbed my camera and started taking photos. People on the street wondered what I was doing, looked up and remarked to each other how wonderful the clouds were. Would they have noticed if they didn’t see me looking skyward?

Well speaking of looking upwards, the Moon is up in the morning on this day but even so once the Moon is up it must be time to finish off and get to bed.

I hope you enjoyed my August.

I hope this finds you serene and at peace with all that surrounds. Did you have a favourite?
Perhaps you would like to join us with your Changing Seasons post?

About The Changing Seasons

The Changing Seasons is a monthly project where bloggers around the world share their thoughts and feelings about the month just gone. We all approach this slightly differently, though generally with an emphasis on the photos we’ve taken during the month.

For many of us, looking back over these photos provides the structure and narrative of our post, so each month is different. Some focus on documenting the changes in a particular project — such as a garden, an art or craft project, or a photographic diary of a familiar landscape.

But in the end, it is your changing season, and you should approach it however works for you.

There are no fixed rules around post length or photo number — just a request that you respect your readers’ time and engagement.

Tags and ping-backs

Tag your photos with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons so that others can find them

Create a ping-back to Ju-Lyn at Touring My Backyard and/or this post, so that we can update it with links to all of yours.

Letting you into my groove

The Lens-Artists Challenge #211: What’s Your Photographic Groove

What’s my photographic groove? I don’t have one particular theme except for showcasing the flora and fauna of Australian and quite often from my place.

The native bees here are lovely bees, they don’t sting and are small. The Blue-banded bee and the Teddy Bear Bees are favourites.

The wonderful birds are probably my all time favourite things to photograph. All of these are from my place except for the Golden-headed Cisticola on the barbed wire fence.

I love to have butterflies in my garden. The Blue Triangle Butterfly was one that was never here. When I first saw one many years ago, I made it one of my photographic quests to get a photo, which took a while as they are very shy butterflies. I finally managed to get one. The photo here. A few years later, they turned up in my garden

Of course I have to include the animals which are unique to Australia. I did have Koalas who used my place a s trail to get from one area to another. I never saw any but could here there calls at night. Since the fires of 2019, I haven’t seen or heard any. I did often see Dingoes or heard them calling in the night. Again they have disappeared from the landscape. I always have Red-necked Wallabies in the garden but they too are in reduced numbers. The big Eastern Grey Kangaroos used to travel through the bottom of my place where the bush isn’t as thick but never around the house. There are always Brush-tailed Possums as well.

I could not go without leaving a few native flowers, Bottlebrush, a Purple Fringe Lily, a Paperbark flower and Eucalypt flowers with a Brown Honeyeater atop.

I hope it was fun peeking into bushboys world

This is June 2022

A wonderful start to Winter in my part of the world. The rain has stopped for the moment. The days are in the low 20’sC with cold night into single figures necessitating lighting the fire giving a warm glow to the loungeroom.

I have managed to get out for a few little excursions as well as take photos at home. A lot of time has been spent cutting and splitting firewood with a few delays as I have me camera with me just in case something happens – or has been the case a few times not have it.

I hope my June song to scroll with works for you. Please enjoy

I did make it out for a quite pastel sunrise. Something to begin with for having a look at what I found in June. I loved the lines across the sky.

Someone else was enjoying the early morning as well aboard their yacht

The sparse vegetation on the point at Wooli really does take the brunt of wind and water

On the other side of the point, the river winds its way to the sea. A Striated Heron took a stroll while the tide was out looking for lunch.

In the morning at Iluka, a fluffed up Pied Butcherbird warmed up among the Banksia trees

There was a look at the works the Iluka Landcare team had been doing planting Red Gums to increase the Koala habitat. While we were there looking around I spied a Pacific Baza. Later on her mate appeared and landed on a branch above her.

In the late afternoon a White-cheeked Honeyeater sitting atop a Banksia sang to the setting sun

A Silver Gull basking in the afternoon sun on a wharf post.

An Australian Pelican kept a wary eye on me while resting on the old wharf post

A nearby Darter was stretching probably contemplating heading off if I came any closer

There are all manner of ways to secure your craft at the wharf. I was attracted to the rust.

Overhead an Osprey patrolled the beach looking for breakfast

Back in South Grafton the copious amount of Little Corellas wheeled about before landing on their roost or in the paddock to scour the ground for seeds and grubs. Little Corellas are migrants who arrived on the coast after a very prolonged drought over the ranges. They liked it so much they never left, built up numbers and can now be found all along the coast.

The Little Corellas were flying over this part time wetland. The Black Swans had a nest among the reeds in early June. The Pacific Black Ducks were always around looking for a meal as well as other water birds. Towards the end of June the paddock dried out and the farmer let a few cattle in to graze. Unfortunately all the reeds you can see were eaten down to almost ground level. I fear that the Black Swans nest was disturbed, perhaps even trampled by the cattle as I never saw any Cygnets.

One surprise when I went to a small village, Diggers Camp, was this Pheasant Coucal hunting for insects. He didn’t even care about me walking about.

This little Superb Fairy Wren female, called a Jenny wren, blended well with the grass at Iluka as she foraged for food.

While this Jenny wren kept an eye on me at my place as I walked through the bush.

She was making sure I didn’t get too close to her babies

A Red-browed Firetail Finch took in the afternoon sun

A Grey Butcherbird stayed in the shadows while looking about for food.

Standing on your head to get some nectar an Eastern Spinebill enjoys a Bottlebrush in my garden.

Walking down my street I saw a Jackie Winter was just sitting on the wire fence

On the way back, a Restless Flycatcher was intently watching something while sitting on the wire fence.

I often have photos of Satin Bowerbirds but rarely have a male and a female in the same photo. They were hanging around the tree near the verandah. This photo is through my office door while sitting at my desk. I love lazy photography.

I had been putting out some bird seed on the verandah to see who was around. The Male Satin Bowerbird and a Blue-faced Honeyeater came for an inspection.

A young Blue-faced Honeyeater and a King Parrot looked hopeful.

A juvenile King Parrot just getting his adult feathers hopped about the verandah.

The Firesprite Grevillea is having a fantastic flowering. A number of the smaller honeyeaters are able to sit on the flowers. This Eastern Spinebill was always chasing the Brown Honeyeaters away from “his” flowers.

All of the Grevilleas had a good flowering in June. This one was a rescue plant that has done well.

The Coconut Ice Grevillea also having a great season.

In the Iluka Rainforest some of the old fallen trees have some wonderful wood fungi

The wood fungi at my place has been bright orange

OK Now for all the people who don’t like spiders get that scrolling finger ready to zoom past this beautiful Huntsman Spider I disturbed when I was cleaning up around a shed.

Here is your second warning…..you know who you are.

Ready, steady……scroll

Now for a bit of arty farty. Looking deep into a stump and a cascade of moss with a rim of lichen.

A stick on the beach

She Oak needles with a blue sea and sky – Minimalism

Sunset through the trees with some ICM (Intentional Camera Movement)

Looking out of my kitchen window at the Red-necked Wallabies grazing in the garden

I love a foggy morning. Looking down the hill near my shed.

Well it looks like the sun is setting so it must be time to get going. The sunset at Iluka was a treat.

The Super Moon was supposed to be a wonderful sight. This is the best I could do. Goodnight and see you next Changing Seasons for a wrap-up of what I found.

Of course I would love to know what your favourite photo is.

The Changing Seasons

The Changing Seasons is a monthly project where bloggers around the world share their thoughts and feelings about the month just gone. We all approach this slightly differently — though generally with an emphasis on the photos we’ve taken during the month.

For many of us, looking back over these photos provides the structure and narrative of our post, so each month is different. Some focus on documenting the changes in a particular project — such as a garden, an art or craft project, or a photographic diary of a familiar landscape.

But in the end, it is your changing season, and you should approach it however works for you.

There are no fixed rules around post length or photo number — just a request that you respect your readers’ time and engagement.

Tags and ping-backs

Tag your photos with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons so that others can find them

Create a ping-back to Ju-Lyn’s latest post or my post, so that we can update it with links to all of yours.

Re-Living the Past #20 – My first yellow native flowers

Cee’s FOTD

I took these photos in 2011-2014 of native flowers I found on my place. I didn’t record their names at the time as I didn’t have a good reference book and I was crap at internet searches

On being green

Friendly Friday Challenge: Green
A Photo a Week Challenge: Nature at Work

Being green is quite easy for me being my lifestyle since I was in my teens…..way back then. Living in the Australian bush, having to rely on my own water supply, heating and most recently cooling and solar power to supplement my existing electrical consumption, I guess makes me think about what I do and the impact on the environment.

I also belong to Landcare and assist others in restoring or rehabilitating their patch of land as well as doing the same on my place.

This post is a mix of just green as well as nature doing its thing. I love this Pitcher Plant photo. Not many plants consume insects to survive. I’d be drawn to the colour as well.

A little green iridescent beetle doing his thing on a green leaf

This is a bit of green colour and how nature comes back after a fire

and with Eucalypts, the first flush of new growth is usually red

Once the red growth has established, the green takes over to do the plants chlorophyll and photosynthesis thing

Butterflies do wonders for plants reproduction and pollination. I love the annual migration of Caper White Butterflies although last seasons migration there wasn’t as many butterflies.

Bees are always busy

Whether sitting on a plant or flying to the next one to gather nectare and pollinate the flowers

Birds, like this Eastern Spinebill, also have a part in the pollination process as the pollen sticks to their feathers and is transferred from flower to flower as the drink nectare as well

Tiny Scarlet Honeyeaters also move pollen as they drink

Bigger Blue-faced Honeyeaters get right into the flowers and sometimes find insects as well as consuming nectare and spreading pollen.

Bigger birds like Wedged-tailed Eagles take care of the carrion and unfortunately road kill

It is easy to be green and enjoy yourself at the same time

Let’s go for a drive

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #203: Local Vistas

Everyone ready. Get comfortable. Put some music on

OK, turn left out of the gate and down the road

Turn left and head down to Lilydale

Go past the Ospreys nest

Yes someone has to open the gate

and here we are at Lilydale. Want to go for a quick swim?

Back in the car we rattle over the old wooden bridge and are soon at Cangi

It is rather peaceful and a good place to grab a bit to eat

Back onto the highway and head up the Gibraltar Range

First stop is always at the Raspberry Lookout

Where we will find native wildflowers like these Paper Daisies

or other native flowers with Blue-banded Bees

and perhaps a Nobbi Lizard sun baking on the rocks

among the yellow Paper Daisies

Just a bit further up the road is Washpool National Park where the first stop is Granite Rocks

and then further into the valley and into the rainforest where the giants live

Time to head for home back down the highway

and down the road to home

Through the gate

and time for a cup of tea

This is May 2022

Well another wet and rainy month. Not as much rain as the previous three months but enough to keep the ground sodden. I didn’t take a lot of photos and some I did take just weren’t all that good as the light was quite poor.

Some of these photos have been enhanced using my photo editing program. Some people have asked what I use to edit my photos. I use Corel PaintShop Pro Ultimate 2022. I used to use Corel when I was working so it made sense to use the same program only a better version. I have used it since 2009 and upgraded every year as some of the function change and improve.

Trying to think of a May song for you to scroll to. Arcade Fire’s Month of May is a bit fast and you might get scrolling in a rapid fashion but I really like Arcade Fire. ACDC’s Stormy May Day seems appropriate being Aussie and the weather but not all enjoy ACDC. So I went for something a bit gentler and also a band who started their career in Australia with one of their lesser know songs which I love. Enjoy your scroll while having a listen.

I managed to get away for a few days to visit a mate at Port Stephens. I started my drive in rain and after a while the skies cleared and I was lucky enough to have a couple of days in sunshine.

This is sunrise from his place. So as the sun is up, lets go.

We went for a picnic and saw a White-bellied Sea Eagle cruising the shore line.

Meanwhile back at home the rains continued and again the Clarence Valley experienced a minor flood. Previous floods in March, the water went over the pylons but under the Grafton Bridge.

The Pacific Black Ducks didn’t seem to mind the high water.

I had fungi popping up around the place but not as much or as many as I thought. Possibly as it was wet and not much sunshine or heat in the soil.

I love the colour and frills on this little fungus

When I went to clean out the leaves from my water tank strainers, this big fat Green Tree Frog was sitting on the tank. It was not a good idea as a bird would have loved to make a meal of it. This photo was taken in my green house where I relocated the frog so it may have some insects to snack on as well be safe.

While in the shade house I took a few photos of the Begonias and the flowers. This is one is the better photos of Wax Begonia flowers with some water drops.

Water drops were everywhere and it was hard not to try and get a few photos despite the dismal overcast days. This orange Hibiscus has loved all the rain and has flowered better than ever.

I saw sparkles when one evening the sunset looked spectacular through the trees

This year the Zygote Cactus are flowering so well. I love this apricot coloured one which is a new one in the shade house getting started. Also has water drops all over.

I had this Zygote on the verandah and it wasn’t happy so I put the pot in the garden. It certainly enjoyed a change of scenery.

The Satin Bowerbird didn’t seem to mind when the rain started to fall. He was more intent on enjoying lunch.

Christine – Stine Writing – said she didn’t know that birds, other than parrots, could be green when I posted a photo of a Green Catbird Well here you go Christine here’s another one. A female Satin Bowerbird in the tree outside of my office.

The Satin Bowerbirds liked the fruit of the Benjamina Fig Tree

The Benjamina Fig Tree had a fantastic fruiting this year as well. The fruits are around 10mm and when they fall the Peaceful Doves walk around under the tree eating the fallen fruits

The little Silvereyes liked eating the figs too and then pop over to the Grevilleas for a bit of a sweet drink.

The bees enjoyed the sweet nectar too. Here a couple of bees shooting are the breeze over a few drinks.

The Chinese Lanterns looked good in May and continue to flower.

The Cats Whiskers are having a full on flowering too. After this flowering I will have to get some cuttings as I love Cats Whiskers as do insects. Unfortunately the Red-necked Wallabies like them as well so I have to fence the plants.

Through the bush the Egg and Bacon plants are flowering. Some are covered in these tiny 10-12mm flowers other plants have less numbers of flowers but are showy nevertheless.

At this time of year, the Eastern Spinebills turn up at my place. This Spinebill enjoyed the Pentas flowers in the garden.

One exciting thing to happen was that the Eastern Whipbirds that live in the gullies around my house have started to come into the garden. They are quite allusive and move rapidly through the undergrowth occasionally giving off their whip cracking call in the bushes. I managed to get this photo from my verandah.

The Golden Whistlers are in the garden too. This female was quite happy to pose for a few photos before flying off into the bush.

Sometimes the birds come to me. This Blue-faced Honeyeater flew onto the verandah to come to see what I was doing in my office.

What has been lacking for a lot of this year has been Red-necked Wallabies around the house. I was pleased to see a small mob turn up for a couple of days and one female had a joey. I grabbed a photo from the verandah down toward the end of the garden just as they were hopping away.

I was so glad that they turned up the next day and were in the garden for quite a while. The little Joey was quite adventurous and hopped away from Mum but not too far. Yes another verandah shot.

I did get out a couple of times and again I had a sunny day when I left the rain at my place and went to see a mate who was holidaying at Woolgoolga. On the way home I stopped at the lookout and there was a pair of Australasian Pipits hopping around the car park.

Another car park stroller. This time at the riverbank in Grafton while I was checking out the floodwaters a Crested Pigeon just walked past.

Another bit of excitement was when I was driving home from town one afternoon and I saw a Black-necked Stork in a flooded paddock that has turned into a quasi wetland. That is where I took the photos of the Black Swans recently. This time she was close to the road so I managed to get quite a number of good photos.

The Black-necked Stork is the only species of stork that occurs in Australia. Its name is a little misleading, as the bird’s neck is not black, but an iridescent green-and-blue sheen. I only just found out that the female has a yellow eye.

Another bit of excitement was hearing a sound in the garden late one afternoon and seeing a shape moving around the garden. I realised it wasn’t a Wallaby and saw a Northern Bandicoot looking for dinner in the garden. I rarely see Bandicoots but know they are around by the holes that are dug around the garden looking for worms and grubs.

The only other time I have taken a video of a Bandicoot in the chook house in 2014. You can see that this one is a female as there is movement in her pouch.

I think this could be a male but it moved quickly and I didn’t get a good look at it. When it stood on it’s back legs to see what it heard in the garden, it had its back to me. Males can weigh up to 3kg

As I mentioned before, one evening there was a spectacular sunset. I don’t get to see sunsets and sunrises living among the trees in the bush or forest, so when I do they are spectacular.

About The Changing Seasons

The Changing Seasons is a monthly project where bloggers around the world share their thoughts and feelings about the month just gone. We all approach this slightly differently — though generally with an emphasis on the photos we’ve taken during the month.

For many of us, looking back over these photos provides the structure and narrative of our post, so each month is different. Some focus on documenting the changes in a particular project — such as a garden, an art or craft project, or a photographic diary of a familiar landscape.

But in the end, it is your changing season, and you should approach it however works for you.

There are no fixed rules around post length or photo number — just a request that you respect your readers’ time and engagement.

Tags and ping-backs

Tag your photos with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons so that others can find them

Create a ping-back to Ju-lyn at Touring My Backyard or this post, so that we can update it with links to all of yours.

White flowers in black and white

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Flowers

Paperbark flowers

Native Gardenia flower

Eucalypt flower

Native flower – perhaps a Scrambling Lily

Crocus

Getting up close in the garden

Cee’s Mid-week madness Challenge May: Close up or Macro

I have been trying to get on top of my photos, naming, categorising and putting into folders. I never ending job which I let get out of control.

For this months CMMC, I have these photos from 23 March 2020 that I found while sorting today. Only one has been used before but I didn’t care as I really like it. Can you guess which one?

A blue native flower most likely Scurvy Weed

A pink Pentas from my garden

Caper White Butterfly also on a Pentas flower, this time a red variety

A cape Water Lily flower on my dam with a bonus insect either a fly or a bee

This is April 2022

April was another wet month but not as wet as March. The ground around the house is still soggy thanks to rain last night. Thankfully a few days of little or no rain made it possible to mow the jungle around the house but it is still too wet to get the chainsaw out to cut firewood for Winter.

I have lots of logs to choose from nearby that have been the fallen trees after the fire. They are nicely seasoned now and will make good burning timber once I can get to them.

Here is your April music to scroll through the photos. I think you will enjoy this one. I haven’t heard it before so a new one for me too.

Here’s an appropriate car so jump in and let’s get going.

Tiny wants me to get off the computer and hand out some seeds for his breakfast.

Another photo from my office. This time through the door of a Satin Bowerbird.

Lots of birds have been making Durranbah a place to rest, eat and have a bit of a song. Golden Whistlers songs fill the bush. This is a female Golden Whistler

The little Brown Honeyeaters like to sip from Pentas flowers

Especially in the early morning

It was good to see a group of Grey-crowned Babblers in my garden

They like to rip apart the Stringybark trees looking for insects or walk about on the ground flicking over leaves and bits of bark.

Another visitor is a number of

Sometimes they look quite serious

A little Silvereye was digging around in some leaves that were bound with web. I kept watching and it found lunch

Always have to include my favourite in the garden, an Eastern Yellow Robin

I heard that the Magpie Geese had arrived at a wetland near Casino, about 100kms north of my place. There is a wetland near Grafton where they spend their Winter so I went to see if they had arrived. I found an Australian Raven silhouetted in a tree on a grey day.

There were a flock of Plumed Whistling Ducks

and a large group of Magpie Geese

They kept on flying in. It looks lie a sequential shot but it is actually three Magpie Geese

In another piece of still inundated farmland in South Grafton, a Pacific Heron is getting lots to eat. I drive past this place when I go to town. This morning I went in early and was able to get a few photos of the birds who I have seen there in the past few times heading into town.

I was so pleased to see a pair of Comb-crested Jacanas foraging among the reeds

There were a number of Black Swans foraging as well

Soon she was joined by her mate

OK back at home there have been a few butterflies but not as many as I would have tough. Probably because of the rain. I was happy to see a Wanderer

The strange looking Leafwing Butterfly was heading past and stopped for a photo

There were a few Black Jezebels in the garden. This one stayed for a while on the Bottlebrush flowers.

This is what the Black Jezebels look like with their wings folded.

This is the inside view. They are like this because when they fly it is similar to a strobe effect to confuse predators.

One of my favourite bees, a Teddy Bear Bee zooms in on a Pentas flower

While my other favourite, a Blue-banded Bee enjoys a Salvia flower

Over at the dam the frogs aren’t as vocal but the dragonflies are in abundance. A Black-headed Skimmer found a twig to rest upon.

A Red Skimmer decided a reed was the place of choice

It took a lot of photos to get a dragonfly zipping around the dam.

The Cape Waterlilies are in bloom this Autumn

I have a couple of Golden Corn plants and this year they have flowered

The Pink Trumpet bushes have had one of the best flowering. Looks like I need to water them a lot more to get lots of flowers like this. The bushes have hundreds of flowers

It is always lovely to see native flowers pop up

I was sitting at the computer when this bloke decided to walk around my desk

Well, Our Moon is up, so I better get going. I hope you enjoyed a look at what I found in April. As always I would like to know your favourite photo or photos.

As always join Ju-Lyn from Touring My Backyard for The Changing Seasons

About The Changing Seasons

The Changing Seasons is a monthly project where bloggers around the world share their thoughts and feelings about the month just gone. We all approach this slightly differently — though generally with an emphasis on the photos we’ve taken during the month.

For many of us, looking back over these photos provides the structure and narrative of our post, so each month is different. Some focus on documenting the changes in a particular project — such as a garden, an art or craft project, or a photographic diary of a familiar landscape.

But in the end, it is your changing season, and you should approach it however works for you.

There are no fixed rules around post length or photo number — just a request that you respect your readers’ time and engagement.

Tags and ping-backs

Tag your photos with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons so that others can find them

Create a ping-back to Ju-Lyn or this post, so that she can update it with links to all of yours.