This is March 2021

March seemed to whizz by but not before dumping a lot of rain on the East Coast of Australia. I have well over 300mls at my place, the gullies were rushing, the water tanks and dams filled to overflowing. Probably the best part of March I was given the all clear to drive again. What a difference that has made to my life. Independence to get about and even do simple things like shopping.

With all the rain and occasional sunshine the grass and vegetation in the bush has grown. The grass is so thick it is almost waist high and impenetrable. I have been waiting for things to dry out a bit so I can use my new lawnmower and other tools. Yes I did have to buy a new mower as the old one died and a second hand replacement was not very good. The new lawnmower, and I use the term lawn loosely, had one session around the house but in a week it’s hard to see where I mowed.

Enough of this lets get going. Another rather large post with lots of photos. I haven’t included more as there has been some used in my addiction – photo challenges. So get a cup or glass of your favourite drink, perhaps a snack and I hope you can spend a bit of time having a look at my March.

Your March song to scroll to while picking a favourite.

I am starting at the beach. During a Regional Landcare Gathering we went to Arrawarra Beach where one of the First Nation Elders showed the fish traps which have been there for thousands of years and modified over time to take advantage of changing tides. I found a few things including this wonderfully coloured rock. We’ll come back to the beach a bit later.

When nature reclaims. A building in Grafton, my nearest town has this tree and along the facade ferns are growing as well.

The flowers have almost finished leaving the nuts behind ready to drop seeds on this Eucalypt tree at my besties.

The flowers were quite stunning all over the tree at my besties place for the birds and insects to feast upon. Now the seed eaters will have a go at the nuts.

A delicate pea type flower of the Lance-leaved Rattlepod. Can you spot the tiny native bee?

My besties garden is fabulous. I love this Hibiscus.

Not to be out done, the Golden Lycras in my garden were a treat this year.

OK, now back to the beach for a look at the stunning red fern like seaweed which could be an algae.

The water patterns and sand caught my eye.

While heading over the rocks with a group of people, we startled a flock of Ruddy Turnstones who flew off in a second and I only had one chance for a quick photo.

Somehow I don’t think the Pied Cormorant and Sooty Oystercatcher are talking.

The White-faced Heron ignored them both and was intent on hunting among the rocks.

Back at the bird bath a Grey Fantail showed why he is called a fantail

The little Striated Thornbills really enjoyed their bath

Two female Superb Fairy Wrens waited their turn for the bird bath in the morning sun.

A female Rufous Whistler spent some time in my garden looking for insects.

A new bird in my garden!! A Fantailed Cuckoo stopped in for a visit.

An Eastern Rosella enjoys the morning sun.

I wondered why a dead tree was loosing the branches. Then I found out. An Australian Raven was building a nest. It’s hard to see the branch in its beak. The flying off photo was just a glimpse of tail unfortunately.

High above, most days, Wedged-tailed Eagles patrol the skies.

Can you count the Straw-necked Ibis in the tree?

It was a wet day and Tiny, the King Parrot, came to see if I had any seeds for him.

Water drops on the Elephant Ears leaf.

More water drops. This time on a spiders web that really looked like diamonds sparkling in the grass.

One day I’ll work out how to capture the beating wings of a Blue-banded Bee as he seeks nectar among the Salvia flowers. I think this Salvia is called Summer Jewel. It flowers non stop from Spring to Autumn and spreads into empty spaces easily. The bees love it.

An unfortunately named Dingy Ring Butterfly among the grass seeds.

A small Line Blue Butterfly and a Stingless Native Bee competing for a snack on the Leopard Lily flower. The Leopard Lily flowers were spectacular this year.

A Meadow Argus Butterfly found the Zinnias in my besties garden.

The number and variety of butterflies in my garden was amazing in March. The Black Jezebels are so beautiful. The inside of their wings is white so when they fly it is like a strobe in order to fool any predators. I love their furry yellow bodies.

Another Jezebel butterfly, this one, a Scarlet Jezebel loved the Bottlebrush flowers.

The Yellow-tufted Honeyeaters also loved the Bottlebrush flowers.

The Honey Gem Grevillea didn’t escape their attention either.

I had to show the whole bird as they are quite stunning.

A Yellow-faced Honeyeater paused from consuming nectar to contemplate whether to chase a Small Green-banded Blue Butterfly for dessert……

….instead had some nourishment from a Yellow Daisy

This Autumn saw a mouse plague in Australia. The grain growing areas had literally thousands of mice everywhere. I didn’t have many but caught a couple nearly every night for a few weeks. One morning I went into the bathroom and here was this little fellow in the bath. Judging by the mess he made, he’d been there since the evening before. I had to take a photo to make sure I identified him correctly. I have Native Mice here so didn’t want to “dispose of” an endangered native mouse called Antechinus.

One day coming home from my besties place I saw the tallest mushroom ever. It stood almost 30cm tall and was a resplendent white.

Meanwhile in other parts of the garden among the mulch pile a brown fungi proliferated. This was one of many groups of fungi on the various piles.

I just had to have a sneak peek under the cap to see the frills.

Well that’s almost all for March. One evening the sunset was such colours I hadn’t seen before. As I don’t actually see Sunrise or Sunsets from my place, this photo is looking towards the South-West of the painted clouds.

One afternoon the sun was looking quite promising. At my besties place there is a spot we call Sunset Hill, a great place to see the sunsets. I went out and took a few photos. One ended up in Becky’s Bright Squares

A while later I was inside when I was called to see the sunset. I thought I had seen it over with but no, it had turned into this sunset. Isn’t that amazing?

This time Our Moon began to rise in the late afternoons so the hint of blue sky, I think, gave the Moon a subtle glow.

I hope you enjoyed a look at my world for March. Please let me know if you had a favourite photo.

Also for Su’s Changing Seasons March 2021

This is February 2021

Hi there, I found February to be a weird month. It rained for thirteen days with heavy rain at the end of the month filling dams and water tanks for the coming Winter. The rest of the time it was hot and humid so I have limited a lot of photos and might use as separate posts later.

The good news is at the end of the month the doctors looked at my latest EEG, this time I was tested for three hours. Well by tested I mean sleep for two and three-quarters of the three hours of the testing. So after almost eight months of not being allowed to drive, I have my drivers licence back with the only condition that I am not allowed to drive between sunset and sunrise. I better have a swag in the back of the ute just in case I’m heading home late from shopping!!!

Anyway, on with the bits and pieces I found in February. I found The Lumineers from a free CD that comes with a music magazine I get. Have a listen while you scroll

It’s morning already. Through the lifting fog, the morning sun kisses the tops of the eucalypts across the valley

High in the dead branches an Old Mans Beard, Tillandsia usneoides which is from Florida but it doesn’t grow meters long like the ones in the swamps, sway in the gentle morning breeze

The farm next door to my besties usually leave the paddock next to her fence as a last minute fattening paddock. They open the gate and the cattle run in to savour the sweet grass or like the bull does, make sue that everyone knows that this is his place.

Meanwhile atop the hillock, a cow wonders what all the fuss is down below while snacking on the long juicy grass.

Willie Wagtails use anything for a vantage spot; not even a sleeping cow is shown any dignity!

One of the downsides of growing grass for cattle to eat is that a lot of small seed eaters come in to feed in the mornings and afternoons. Wrens, Finches, Cisticolas and Chestnut-breasted Mannikins. It’s lucky that there is a lot of grasses along the road verges and fence lines so there is plenty to eat for everyone.
This Chestnut-breasted Mannikin contemplates whether the seed head over there will be tastier than the one he’s sitting on.

The Willie Wagtail chicks are out of the nest but still as demanding as ever.

The Scaly-breasted Lorikeets come in for a breakfast of Mistletoe flowers and seeds. I love how they land on the branch on walk down head first, sampling food along the way. These Mistletoe hang down almost two meters from the tree branch. You can see the difference in the leaves. The Eucalypt on the right and Mistletoe on left, both have sickle leaf shapes.

In the garden, A Lewins Honeyeater and a Yellow Grevillea.

When out on a drive before I was allowed to, there was a Black Swan pair are setting up on a dam not far from my place. Now I can drive, I can go and see how they are going and hope they hung around. The property doesn’t have much vegetation and cattle. You can see the edge of the dam in the background.

While out on the drive, at the Raspberry Lookout while I was taking photos, a Wedged-tailed Eagle was watching me

After finding a safe spot to stop on a narrow road, I took the photo of the White-bellied Sea Eagle through the open car window. He was on the far side of the Nymboida River so I was amazed that I managed to get a photo on full telephoto without a tripod.

We went down to Ballina with some friends and on the entrance to the North Wall, a break-wall where the Richmond River meets the sea, on the Marine Rescues radio tower, an Osprey was having his lunch of fish. The young Osprey was sitting nearby and must have been fed as it was asleep.

Late afternoon, low light I came across a juvenile Black-necked Stork doing it’s stretches in preparation for take off from the intermittent wetlands on a farm, again not vegetation in or around the wetland. The next time I had to go to town, the Storks were gone so practice pays off.

While the youngster was flapping about, not far away one of the Black-necked Stork parents was keeping watch.

OK we are heading into the bugs. Nothing to be concerned about in this lot I can assure you. See, first off is the egg casing for Praying Mantis. I must go and try and find it to see if it’s still there.

This Dragonfly almost looks like a helicopter. Such beautiful markings and colours no wonder it is called an Australian Tiger.

A Blue Skimmer found his favourite stick. I was watching for a minute and noticed he would always come back to this stick after a bit of a fly around the river bank. Made for getting a good photo of his wings.

The Lemon Migrants have hung around my place and some are still here.

I have some old chook watering and feed bits and pieces I use when I want to give the birds a snack. I went down that way and noticed a weevil deciding he’d had enough grain for the moment and was off.

Another butterfly that has been around is a Common Albatross Butterfly. They are quite quick and don’t land for long.

The Blue-banded Bees are still hard at gathering pollen. This Salvia is a favourite. Blue-banded Bees are solitary bees and make their nest on the ground.

This year, the lovely pink flowers of the Crepe Myrtle looked stunning

The Cassia flowers are the main attraction for the Lemon Migrant Butterflies. I tried to get butterflies and flowers but the butterflies seem to disappear when the shutter button is pushed. Perhaps there is a lot of Lemon Migrants in there somewhere.

This Native Plant grows grows throughout the place. This is the first time one has grown in a garden bed.

The rain had sparked up the Hibiscus. The Miniature Red looks a treat covered in small red flowers…..

…..and there are many more on the way.

The red Salvia has so many flowers

Last month, the Ivory Curl flowers were just in the almost open stage. Now the Ivory Curl Bush is full of scented flowers and full of all manner if insects. Here a bee burrows down inside to get his pollen while the plant “paints” the bee with pollen from each of the tiny paint brushes.

Foxgloves, old and new, with water drops.

One of the weirdness of some Callistemon trees is the flowers come straight from the old growth branch. Here is a three stage of flower development in the one photo.

The tangerine flowers are stunning

The Champagne Pink Callistemon with yellow tips is so lovely.

The Roses are looking so good

I love the explosive effect you can get photographing Eucalypt flowers

A Lomandra flower and seed spear live up to their common name Spiky Club Rush, a waters edge plant that happily lives in garden and makes great borders.

Speaking of spiky, when out driving there always someone who says slow down, I’m sun-baking here mate. I had to get out of the car and almost touch the Bearded Dragon to get him to move off the road and find a safer spot to catch some rays.

I thought I would save the Yellow Paper Daisies so you could have a rest. I found these at the Raspberry Lookout. I had to clamber down the slope to get the photos. This is what I was concentrating on when the Wedge-tailed Eagle was watching me.

The rain and hot days have bought out some fungi. These dome shaped ones were found in a few places.

Some little ones were pushing from the soil and bark.

Instead of the usual sunset photo to finish off, here is a Green Tree Frog just sitting on the glass door. I guess hanging on with your chin helps.

Thanks for hanging around with me for a while. Hope you can come back next month too.

This post is linked to – Su’s Changing Seasons February 2021
Cee’s CMMC: Close up or Macro
Weekly Prompts Wednesday Challenge: Beautiful

It’s all white now

Terri’s Sunday Stills: A #White Washed World

Puff Ball Fungi

White flower (can’t remember the name)

White Rose

Caper White Butterfly

White Native Hibiscus

White-headed Pigeon

Pelican

Dendrobium flowers

Pied Cormorant

Small white native flowers

White-throated Honeyeater

White Swans on Loch Lamond

White Hydrangea

White calf

A foggy morning

Come to Durranbah for a minute or two

Lens-Artist Challenge #135: Glimpse Into Your World

This will be a few images of my world, not much to say. I guess I should thank everyone for pushing me to do a post. The choices of photos is too large to contemplate so how about I just do a small selection of photos from around my place.

It is a beautiful world

The sealed section for those who dislike the “scary” nature I have here is following

Look away now

Yes you….do it or don’t tell me I didn’t warn you but you really can look at spiders and snakes and ants. I promise they won’t leap from the screen. Anyway they are in small size to make your viewing more comfortable.

So close

This is another double up post. There is Cee’s Mid Week Madness Challenge: January Close Up
and Beckys Square Photo Challenge #SquareUp

Here is a bit of smooth to scroll to

OK, so lets get into a bit up close

A Eucalypt flower

This is a Hawk Moth Caterpillar I think

Dragonflies can look fearsome up close can’t they?

A tiny Begonia flower

and an Orchard Swallowtail Butterfly on a Pentas flower

This is December 2020

Another month of not much but doing a fair bit. Lots of flowers at the moment. I am still debating whether to split some off and into a separate post.. Oh well I make up my mind as I go on. My six months of not driving is up on the 4th January but have to wait until I see the neurologist in early February. I might pester my GP.

I do recommend getting a snack and perhaps a drink, I have one while I am writing . At the moment a wonderful long black espresso and a lovely chocolate my daughter gave me for Christmas.

It has been raining in December, only three days it didn’t rain!!! Over 390mls for the month. Dams, tanks are full, gullies rushing and the sounds of frogs at night is so wonderful. Much better than the sounds of the Cicadas during the day. Some days I have to come inside as they are so loud.

Early morning – barbed wire and a spiders web

I thought I would kick with things off with being surprised. A Goanna was walking through my garden, with a small Cicada snack, took off when he saw me walking towards him. Didn’t drop his lunch.

I was walking about the place when suddenly this fellow popped up from his nest in the grass. I thought he would stay there but hopped off.

The most surprising was seeing a Fox appear on the mulch pile at my besties late one afternoon. He didn’t stay for long

I was surprised to find the commencement of a Jumping Ants nest in front of my potting shed. In case you ever wondered about Durranbah, a word I use a bit as it is the name of my property, these are Durranbah, aboriginal for small jumping ant. They bite and you know you have been bitten I can tell you. When I first moved here, there were quite a number of nests of durranbah. I discourage the nest by just pushing soil in and pushing down on the entrance hole. After around a week they had moved on.

While walking in the bush, this insect was affronted that I would walk so close to his tree and take photos of bark. The tree is a Red Ironbark tree. The bark is very rough. The black is from the fire but the bark is black as well. You can see the new bark pushing out. The new bark will be reddish and darken with age.

There are so many dragonflies. This one followed me over the paddock. They love sitting on grass stalks.

One of the noise makers heading up the tree after busting out of it’s shell

Sometimes trees just stand out from the crowd. I have never seen a Spotted Gum look that colour of green.

Other trees resort to a distinctive orange under the bark layer. I think it is a box tree judging by the strips of bark that is left hanging.

I posted a tangle of Flame Tree flower buds and stalks on last Wordless Wednesday. This is a Flame Tree that is just getting all the flowers.

The Frangipanni are loving the rain and hot waether

Strawberries are growing quite well in my besties wheelbarrow garden. Lovely tiny flowers.

There were a few pink flowers as well.

With the rain the Crocus made their appearance around the garden. I spent time taking photos of their location as I could never remember where they are. Looks like I have been photobombed by a Stingless Native Bee

I was thinking of putting the Hibiscus flowers in another post but here are some anyway. I don’t know their names sorry. Pink Frilly sounds good

This is a miniature Red Hibiscus. Yes I took it at this angle for the “face”

I love the colours of this Day Lily. Another plant from the bloke who used to live down the road.

A Bauhinia flower up close with rain drops. You may wonder that I didn’t go crazy with water drop photos with all the rain I have had.

I love this sad looking Hippeastrum seed head and decaying flowers (especially for Sue)

More Frangipanni and rain drops

My Jacarandas flowered well after all the others in town. I like the purple flowers against a grey sky

or do you like a blue sky?

One of the best things that happened in December was finding a Purple Fringe Lily on my place. I have only ever seen them on the coast in and around sand dunes. Other “firsts” at my place in December have been Whipbirds – I have an audio but no photos of this secretive bird. A Dainty Swallowtail Butterfly flitted around the garden for a few days. No good clear photos as it never settled. A Neon Cuckoo Bee flew around me for a short while. I didn’t have my camera.

I love seeing a pop of colour among the Dianella leaves of the tiny berries

The Tuckaroo trees have so much fruit this year. I have never seen so much fruit on the trees. They are quite small but must be tasty as lots of birds like them

A young male Figbird picking just the right fruit

Peaceful Doves have made the garden their home

The Wonga Pigeon has come back for a short while. Being a bit skittish, he takes off before I see him usually. I’ll have to look carefully tomorrow. I love having a Wonga around.

Even hops up into the verandah just in case there may be a snack up here.

The first sighting of a Dollar Bird at my besties for the season.

The Sacred Kingfishers have a nest near the dam. I love seeing the flashes of blue as they zoom through the garden or dip into the dam’s water

The Square-tailed Kites returned to their nest in the tree across the road.

Lots of water for the year ahead

It’s wonderful to see the dam over flow.

At the bottom dam that is a failure, but gives me a road to the rest of my property, looks like a monster lurks within

Sunset from my house. It is so rare I get to see sunsets in the sky above. Mostly the sunset is through the trees.

and then it changed to this!!!

OK, Sun’s down and Moon is up. One night there was a rainbow around Our Moon

When the Moon is like this, it is getting ready to spill. The Full Moon was a few nights ago, so now it will be emptying. Predictions of rain by scientists too

Also for Su’s The Changing Seasons
and Cee’s FOTD

This is November 2020

Ahhh….November. A mix of wanting to get out and take a few photos, don’t go as it’s getting rather hot out there, look isn’t that interesting and a bit of general ambivalence.

This months song may not be for everyone. A really good 70’s band, Pavlov’s Dog had some wonderful music but the singer, David Surkamp’s voice wasn’t for everyone. I hope you give the song a chance as you scroll around bushboys world.

There was a small amount of rain during November but the last week was not to very hot. It was 41C on the verandah a couple of days ago and it’s been in the high 30’s. Those brief showers bought out this frog, a Tylers Tree Frog, who was on the back door getting out of the rain or maybe getting snacks from the insects attracted to the lights inside the house.

The bird bath at my besties has a work out too. There was a number of Brown Honeyeaters swooping around and having fun

A Mistletoe Bird in the early morning light which brightened it’s red breast.

A female Rufus Whistler was singing out for her mate.

He wasn’t far away and was singing back. They have a wonderful song that resonates through the bush.

A Scarlet Honeyeater found the Bottlebrush flowers

and the Honey Gem Grevillea. Not long after I took this photo, a Noisy Friarbird who thinks they own that part of the garden swooped in frightening the little Scarlet Honeyeater off.

No the Spangled Drongo isn’t broken!! One hot day a Spangled Drongo decided to have a dip in the old pool and hang out to dry.

This is what a Spangled Drongo looks like when it feels a bit regal.

Tiny, the resident King Parrot, sat on the old Tree Fern trunk in the garden as I was going outside doing a number of poses.

This mad Little Friarbird sat on the window sill outside of my office window for ages just squawking and carrying on. I eventually gave up and went elsewhere to escape the constant noise.

These purple flowers haven’t opened yet and this is a large bud I guess

The Cactus in the pot flowered and flowered for most of the month.

I love the colour of this rose

A little creeper slowly trying to get a foothold. Hope the hot weather doesn’t set it back. The flower is about 5mm across

Here is a big part of the garden I don’t show often. This is an Elkhorn Fern. The fronds can get to 90cm or about 36 inches. It is an epiphyte. I attached a small piece to the tree around twenty years ago. It has endured some hardships but now looks great. Around 1 meter in height and girth and still growing. From this one there are quite a number of small plants growing around the garden and into the bush.

A delicate native pea flower. Again a tiny flower almost 10mm in diameter

The Billy Bonkers Grevillea has been flowering non-stop even through Winter. Each of those red striped parts of the flower is about the size of a match head.

I went over to the dam in the afternoon perhaps to capture a photo like the one with the little frog in the flower. I didn’t know at the time that I managed to get a spider, this time on the flower stalk.

The Flame Tree’s leaves are a favourite for a caterpillar or other leaf chewing insect.

This is a new Native Bee to add to my list of Australian Native Bees. I discovered this one, a Gold-tipped Leafcutter Bee, at my besties place

I snuck up on the Orchard Swallowtail Butterfly while it was busy with it’s head inside of the Agapanthus flower.

I haven’t seen the wallabies around the house much over Winter. After the fires the vegetation growth has been amazing so they have lots of feed elsewhere. Do you remember the Joey and Mum I was feeding after the fires? Here she is with the little one almost grown and too big to get into the pouch any more.

I just love this Holden Ute. These were the first cars built in Australia in the late 1940’s early 50’s, the Holden FX and FJ Models. My elder brother owned a FJ sedan of the same model as this one

Thanks for stopping by and having a look through my world in November. Did you have a favourite photo?

Also for Su’s Changing Seasons

A flower is formed

It seems like forever that I actually posted something other than photo challenges. Everyone likes flowers don’t they? If you have never seen a Crinum flower before, look at every photo carefully and when you get to the last photo, scoot back up to the first photo with your mouth still open. This Crinum is Crinum pedunculatus, Swamp Lily – a native Australian plant found in the rivers and creeks in my catchment area.

This is how a Crinum flowers form, a sort of single bud on a long stalk. This one has started to split open. That white wriggly thing on the right hand side of the bud is part of the flowers development.

The bud has split open more with more white things appear.

Now everything has broken free of it’s bindings and starts to spread. There is always one insect who wants to have the first drops of nectare

with each of those buds opening up over time so there is always a flower for the season and what a flower they are, delicate and striking

Cee’s FOTD

This is October 2020

How late am I getting this done? So many things of no consequence happening and I am being very slack in sorting photos and getting myself together.

This may be a bit haphazard and not quite concise with the flow and descriptions but I just wanted to get this post out for my own piece of mind. Admittedly I did get a bit wayward with trying to get things together for Becky’s wonderful #SquareKind photo challenge.

On a personal note, I saw the Neurologist in October and I saw the MRI of my brain. It was fascinating to see the slices and was very happy to see there wasn’t anything untoward. But as I thought, she reaffirmed the legal requirement that I don’t drive a vehicle, that includes the farm ute, ride-on lawnmower as well not operate a push mower, chainsaw, power tools or climb ladders. Well that stops me from doing about 80% of my life. It’s for my own safety and the safety of others. Social isolation and Covid lock downs are almost mainstream but now I am in Neuro Lock down as well as my normal social isolation due to living in a almost remote location.

Enough of that, let’s get started. All sitting comfy with some refreshments to hand as you should know by now I do post a lot of photos which summarises what I saw and found in My October 2020. Have a bit of a listen as you scroll too. I am sure you may enjoy a song…..

AS usual, lets start with a wonderful sunrise

The Spangled Drongos were awake enjoying the morning

Rufous Whistlers sang in the morning

A Red-backed Fairy Wren had his morning bath

The female Satin Bowerbird dived right in

A White-faced Heron stood guard in the morning protecting the nest high in the tree

A Yellow-faced Honeyeater came for breakfast on the Honey Gem Grevillea

Two White-naped Honeyeaters debated whether to grab a snack or have a bath

The Striated Pardalote looked for food on my verandah.

This Satin Bowerbird has set up home in my garden.

The old swimming pool, now a bit of a dragonfly and frog haven, attracted the attention of a Scared Kingfisher who decided that this was the place to have a bath.

The first of the Rainbow Lorikeets turned up in the garden to check it out for Summer.

Rainbow Bee-eaters were a splash of colour for a Spring morning

Only a mother could love a baby Noisy Friarbird

Sometimes King Parrots like to hang about in the garden

We went to one of our favourite spots for a bit of a look around to see the fire recovery and have a picnic. Raspberry Lookout is just up the range from my place and a favourite spot.

The Banksia trees had a good burn but this helps the seeds germinate as they pop open and scatter with papery like seed that blow on the wind. Children’s stories talk of the Banksia men. They do look a bit scary don’t they

It was good to see that a lot of the vegetation was growing. I love the colours of the new growth of the Trigger Plant.

The Native Lilac False Sarsaparilla were flowering quite well. I also have this species on my place.

The Trigger Plant flowers attracted a Native Bee

IN my garden, the Stingless Native Bees filled their pollen sacks from the Hippeastrums

A Large Yellow Butterfly came for a visit to the Bottle Brush flowers

Common Grass Blue Butterflies were everywhere in the garden this Spring

The first of the Caper White Butterflies arrived in late October and many more were here a few days ago. They love the Pentas flowers in my garden

It is always lovely to see Orchard Swallowtail Butterflies in the garden. One of the largest butterflies that I get here

I think this may be a mosquito being a pollinator on a Daisy in the garden

Some of the succulents are getting ready for Summer

The Roses at my besties place looked a treat over Winter and Spring. I have too many animal who love to eat the leave and flower buds as well as the flowers for me to grow Roses here.

By the end of October, the Grevilleas have finished their Spring flowering and are setting seeds

This year my Begonias had a very showy flowering.

Another not your usual pollinator, a fly on the Marigolds this time

This tiny Grevillea, called Billy Bonkers, flowers have some attendant ants

The Stingless native Bees like the Dietes flowers too

Agapanthus in the garden had a great flowering this Spring

The bees loved the Cornflowers in my besties garden. I love the radiant blue of Cornflowers.

I wasn’t sure if thge Lolly Bushes would have survived the fire but they have bounced back and the flowering was quite wonderful. Yes the flowers smell like lollies.

Looking inside of the Orange Hippeastrum

Red Dragonflies were all around the garden

After watering the garden one morning, this spiders web attracted my attention with sparkles in the morning sun

After a bit of rain, I went to check to see how much water went into the dam. I noticed one of the Cape Lillies in the middle of the dam looked a bit different. Nestled in among the flower was a Dwarf Green Tree Frog.

Our Moon has risen in the afternoon. I love the blue sky and our Moon

Thanks for visiting and taking the time to have a look at my October. I would like to know if you had a favourite photo. I’ll try not to be so tardy for My November. Have a great day or evening depending on what side of the world you are.

This is September 2020

How are you going so far this year? I am still not allowed to drive so I haven’t had many photo excursions and at times didn’t really feel like taking photos. Do you have times like that too?

It is time to be in the garden and enjoy the warm days. A few days at my place the temperature was in the low 30’s which isn’t Spring weather, more like Summer. The rains that have been promised haven’t eventuated so I am using the dwindling dam water to keep the garden going as best I can. I have been doing a few projects both here at my place and at my besties.

The header photo is looking from my verandah into that part of the garden where the Grevilleas are having a great flowering this Spring.

Instead of having my usual song at the end, I decided to have it up front so you can have a listen while you scroll. So grab a cup of tea or coffee, perhaps a snack or if in the evening join me in a glass of your choice as it’s aperitivo time here. Enjoy

One project around the place was to do a rejuvenation of part of the shed. This will be the potting shed and have a lot of the gardening equipment and tools.

One of the bonuses of living on the north coast of NSW is being able to get down to the coast and watch the whales migrate.

Back at home for a few insects to start the photo journey of my September. The Pittosporum had so many flowers this year it was a treasure trove for the tiny Native Stingless Bees.

The Wide_brand Grass-dart butterfly was hard to catch as they didn’t sit still very long.

Southern Silver Ochre butterflies spent more time

The Black Jezebels came flying through regularly in September. The thing you notice is a white butterfly flitting among the flowers with its erratic flight. the next photo helps to explain.

This is the inside wings of the Black Jezebel. When they fly they give a sort of strobe effect designed to confuse any predators along with an erratic flight.

Another of the Jezebels, Southern Jezebels are always a delight to have in the garden. The Honey Gem Grevillea flowers were quite an attraction.

The Honey Gem and other grevilleas had an amazing flowering with a bit of rain in late August enough to get things happening in the garden in September. The Blue-faced Honeyeaters were the bullies of the garden chasing most of the birds, especially the noisy Friarbirds, away from the flowers.

But as you see the Noisy Friarbirds still were able to sneak in for a feed

Another of the Friarbird, Little Friarbirds, were constant visitors as well

I have been putting a bit of food out fro the birds every now and then but not every day so they don’t become dependent on food from me. The Female King Parrot really looked good with her breeding plumage.

The males were quite resplendent too. Remember Tiny, well he is still around the garden most days.

Leaden Flycatchers hung around the old swimming pool always on the lookout for a snack to come along.

I love their inquisitive looks so I had to include a second photo.

The Female Rufus Whistler also has an inquisitive look around the garden

The songs of the Rufus Whistlers have resounded in the bush all September. They are all around the surrounding forest occasionally coming into the garden. This male Rufus Whistler was singing in the garden early one morning.

One afternoon coming home from town, we were driving through South Grafton when a large flock of Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos came screeching into the trees in peoples backyards.

The Satin Bowerbird found where I dropped a few bread crumbs on the verandah. Satin Bowerbirds are quite nervous and will take off at the slightest movement. I often get a few photos through the door while sitting at my desk if I am sneaky enough.

At my besties the little Red-backed Wren come through her garden in the afternoons looking for a bit to eat among the flowers and garden beds.

We were sitting on her verandah having a cup of tea when we saw a large bird fly into the lower part of the garden. When I got to the other end of the verandah I saw a White-faced Heron walking along with a large stick. I watch where he flew into a nearby tree but he nest was too well hidden.

The tiny Scarlet Honeyeaters prefer red Grevillea flowers

If you need a break, here’s a bit of sky with a wispy cloud face or what can you see?

Yes it is Spring in Australia so no Spring post couldn’t go past without a few lots of flower photos, First up, a Daisy with an insect trying to hide. All of the following photos are from my besties garden except when I mention it’s from mine.

The Dianthus are a pretty shade of pink in the garden.

The white Gerbera really stands out

There are quite a few different Gazanias. I love this pink one

or perhaps I like this one more

The Cornflowers looked a treat

This Hibiscus was a new planting and I didn’t expect to see a flower this year on a small bush. the deep red is stunning

The violas are self seeding and springing up everywhere in the garden, even in the paths.

This is the red Hibiscus that came from my family home and is one of a couple that are in my garden.

My besties Lions Tails. Such an unusual plant.

It has been a great year for Grevilleas. Here is a selection from my place. Not too sure what this one is. I thought it was a Robyn Gordon but that doesn’t have yellow tips

This is a Robyn Gordon I am sure

The Ever strong Honey Gem, a great food source for birds as well as insects

After the fire at my place, there has been a lot of different species of Lomandra appearing. This is part of the flower stalk of a Lomandra mulitflora

A small native flower – a Gorse Bitter Pea. There are a lot of pea plants and many look similar

This pea flower is a Heathy Parrot Pea. Bunches of flowers on a long stalk. Most of these flowers are about 10mm or about half an inch as are many of the pea plant flowers.

The Paperbarks didn’t flower as well as I thought they would as most of the other native flowers like the Bottlebrush and Grevillea have. The flower is similar to a bottle brush flower only yellow instead of red.

I found this flowering plant on a walk along the trails of Evans Head. The aim was to photograph the native coastal plants flowers but by the time I was able to get there many had finished flowering. At least I saw the whales.

This Australian native flower is one of my all time favourites and is always a treat to find in the bush. I just love Flannel Flowers.

I finally found someone who laughs at my jokes.

Well it’s sunset so I better get going and you should too. Drop me a line if you found a favourite photo

One of the things about this September was that our Moon had risen before the sun had set. I love a Moon and a blue sky don’t you?

Also for Su’s Changing Seasons, September 2020