This is November 2021

Subtitle: Changing Seasons – in conjunction with Ju-Lyn

I didn’t take many photos in November. I am loving the rain. The frogs have been as well. Some nights it is so loud with all the frogs having their say. The most photographed thing, because the rain has made the garden just grow, are flowers splashed throughout the garden. I am doing a garden post as it is too good not to share. I have spent a bit time in the shed so there’s a post about that on the list as well.

The days we had with sunny blue skies which were taken advantage of, so there was lots of photos to pick from for This is November. Grab your usual drink/snack that you may like to consume at this time of your day and enjoy this bit of my world.

Here is your song to scroll to….a new one for me. I hope you enjoy my discovery. Hit play and let’s get scrolling. You can always come back up and stop the music if you don’t like it.

One Saturday morning I woke very early and there was colour in the sky, so I had to try and take a few photos for Hammad’s Weekend Sky. After taking my usual photos from the usual place, I tried to see what I could get through the trees. Most were ok but didn’t show all that much of the coloured clouds. My favourite of the lot.

The cows next door to my besties were calving. I think these two may be related.

On that hill where the calves are, a Double Bared Finch was having lunch too.

It is always lovely to see an Eastern Rosella or two when out and about.

Sacred Ibis always look spectacular as the glide overhead.

On the lookout tree, a Spangled Drongo (top) and a Dollar Bird keep an eye out for some unsuspecting breakfast to be passing by.

In my besties garden, a Pheasant Coucal was calling for a few days. One morning he decided to come out in the sun.

We went away for a few days to Soldiers Point. One day we went for a walk in a nature reserve at Nelson Bay. There’s a few photos from there following as well. A pair of Corellas were checking out the hollows in the Gum Tree to make home maybe.

This made me laugh, the Darter look so serious too.

We found this lily like plant and it has the most wonderful flower. I haven’t been able to ID it yet.

I just love Red and Green Kangaroo Paw flowers which were growing along the track in the nature reserve

At a cafe having a coffee while the waiting for the rain to ease a bit, I saw Bougainvillea flowers had fallen on a table out in the rain.

That’s all from our mini holiday. Remember the last two “This is…..” I have shown the progress of the amazing Gymea Lily flower. I don’t think it will be there next time.

Here is a few from around my garden as a bit of a teaser lol. The agapanthus in the garden have never had as many flowers ever! Mostly blues but some are from plants with white flowers that I never knew their colour.

This white Agapanthus flower stalk was so tall, well over a meter.

The Crinums or Spider Lilys are flowering well this year.

I have been trying to find the right place for the Walking Iris as I love their flowers

I have a Jacaranda tree which is a bit scraggly but this year showed itself as best it could.

Scattered around the garden are Spiny-headed Mat Rush (Lomandra) plants that have long strappy leaves most of the time but they do flower

The Paperbark Trees (Melaleuca quinquenervia) are flowering and the insects and birds are loving them.

I can’t grow roses at my place. It gets too wet and the Possums and Wallabies love them too much. My besties place is ideal. Here is a selection of Roses. This is a tiny climbing variety.

Some of the flowers are amazing. I love this pink one.

Such a deep colour, it is more orange than red in real life

Some Zinnias are appearing.

This is the flower from a Bromiliad which I found in the plant rescue section of a nursery. I took three and said these be easy. He rolled his eyes. Five years later, two survived and this one has flowered for the first time.

Sometimes Thistle flowers look so good.

I always forget to take photos of the Zig-Zag plant when it flowers.

I cannot believe this Pineapple plant. It has been in the garden for as long as I can remember. Every now and then it pops out a fruit. This is the flower stage. Pineapple plants are Bromiliads.

The Day Lilys have been wonderful this year

Even the Stingless Native Bees thinks so as well.

The Variegated Duranta has been flowering since start of Spring. Now it has rained there are flowers everywhere.

There was a break in the rain. A Blue-banded Bee decided to take advantage too.

In the nature reserve we found this amazing way the Lichen has formed. What shapes or things can you see in the photo? IN the top right hand corner is a tiny fern similar to an air plant. They grow on anything organic wood, rock etc

OK Who was paying attention as I would really like to know what was your favourite photo? Did you like the music?

The Changing Seasons is a monthly project where bloggers around the world share their thoughts and feelings about the month just gone. We all approach this slightly differently — though generally with an emphasis on the photos we’ve taken during the month.

For many of us, looking back over these photos provides the structure and narrative of our post, so each month is different. Some focus on documenting the changes in a particular project — such as a garden, an art or craft project, or a photographic diary of a familiar landscape.

But in the end, it is your changing season, and you should approach it however works for you.

There are no fixed rules around post length or photo number — just a request that you respect your readers’ time and engagement.

Tags and ping-backs

Tag your photos with #MonthlyPhotoChallenge and #TheChangingSeasons so that others can find them

Create a ping-back to Ju-Lyn at Touring My Backyard or this post, so that we can update it with links to all of yours.

Also for Cee’s FOTD

This is October 2021

I am quite late with my wrap up for Changing Season for October. Lots has happened and but nothing significant. A lack of rain meant a lot of garden watering but when it did rain it was welcomed by everyone. Managed to do a bit of driving around having a look here and there. The garden looked good when the Hippesatrums flowered adding a splash of colour. Some of the seasonal birds have dropped in, some have stayed, some have kept going to another destination.

Make sure you join in with Ju-Lyn and I for Changing Seasons

Here’s a bit of Aussie rock hoping for a bit of rain. I don’t know if you’ll need a drink and snacks but you could always have some handy just in case. Hit play and start scrolling. If Dragon aren’t to your taste, scroll back up and hit pause or stop.

OK The Sun is up so lets get going. Sunrise at my besties

The fog, the shed and trees next door in the morning

Some mornings everyone is awake early, just singing in the sunrise. Brown Honeyeaters are quite loud for their size.

So are Yellow-faced Honeyeaters. It was a foggy morning at home and sometimes you could hear a bird but not see them.

In the Ponytail Palm, the Willie Wagtails have made a nest. At the moment there are three babies.

Down at the beach a Sooty Oystercatcher takes a stroll past a disinterested Silver Gull

I love these little vertical birds. White-throated Treecreepers start at the bottom of a tree and just hop up and around the tree looking for insects living in the bark. I recently found out that the red spot under the eye means it is a female.

Here is the better one of the Satin Bower Bird and the pear. Much better than my October Last on the Card

At this time of year the Spangled Drongos arrive in the garden.

There is always someone checking out the available real estate. We were out for a walk and on the way I spotted some Rainbow Lorikeets on a big old Spotted Gum. They were inspecting the trees hollows to see if was a move in ready or if someone else already owns the space.

The Leaden Flycatchers were here for a few weeks in October. They don’t stay still for long

The Eastern Rosellas are always lovely to see.

After one of the irregular down pours, a Pied Currawong looked none too pleased……

…….neither did the Australian Raven

No one seems to mind if you hang out your washing when you’re at the beach. The other Darter just looks the other way while the Pied Cormorant tends to his own laundry.

While further along the Evans Head Breakwall an Eastern Water Dragon did a good impression of an Iguana

At my besties we were heading out for the day and the regular Koala to her place was just sitting beneath a tree and then he hopped up the tree a little way

Isn’t she pretty? A young Red-necked Wallaby who comes into my garden regularly. She doesn’t have a Joey or should I say a big Joey yet. Her pouch was flat. When Joeys are born they weigh about two grams. They pop their heads out of the pouch at around six months.

Just a tree and bit of blue sky to segue into the plants and flower section

Looking at the cactus centre as they have just started their Spring spurt. Look sorta familiar. Which blogger has a similar photo as her header?

A view down the garden when the Hippeastrums in the wheelbarrow just dominated the garden colour

The Frangipannis in the garden are starting to shoot

In Grafton the Jacaranda trees are in full bloom, so are the Flame Trees

The Jacaranda flowers have so many shades of purple.

A shower of rain came though giving the cactus with the most fantastic flowers a lovely drink and a water drop display. You’ll have to wait for photos of the flower as they have only just bloomed. Drop by for Macro Monday next week the 8th as there will be an open flower.

The Orange Hippeastrums where starting to bud at the end of October

Getting this photo of a white Daisy and a tiny Ghost Crab Spider, I took quite a lot from all angles. I wrote a post called What do you think? which generated so much traffic, in fact one of my most “popular” posts with 223 views and 124 likes 110 comments. The post was about whether I should delete or keep a photo of the Daisy and spider from another angle completely, as I am trying to be ruthless about keeping some photos that really should go.

On the way to my besties along The Summerland Way, the Coreopsis is flowering and the wind was blowing.

and the flowers stretched out along the side of the road. The background is a forestry pine forest that was burnt in the horrible 2019 statewide fires. Some tree are recovering while others have died. The understory are Eucalypts growing where they used to grow before the pine plantations. Some trees love fire to germinate the seeds that have been stored in the ground for years.

Many years ago there were Impatiens plants in garden beds at the front of my house. I have since removed those garden beds. This year all of these plants have sprung up all around the place with lovely flowers but not necessarily in the garden bed they were planted originally.

Going for a walk at Evans Head we were lucky to find some Flannel Flowers still growing. One of my favourite Australian Native Flowers.

A few days before a Full Moon, Our Moon was around in the early afternoon

I love it when the sunset is so good from my besties place in a spot we call Sunset Hill, the highest part of her place. My favourite is capturing these four trees that are a long way in the distance

Here is the same sunset a while later on from lower down in the yard. The tree and fence posts on the right hand side is Sunset Hill

I do hope you enjoyed a scroll thought my October. Any favourites?

I should add this into Cee’s FOTD

This is September 2021

This was a dry month, following a dry August, a month of wanting rain to fill water tanks and dams which are so low – not enough to water gardens for the next few months. Last night the first good rainfall happened, 17mls in a storm which has made today a smiling day. The garden is happy. With a growth of grass around my house the Red-necked Wallabies have returned to graze which is a lovely sight to see.

I was quite amazed at the amount of flowers in the garden which bought in the birds. The butterflies are yet to arrive in numbers, there are a few small ones here and every now and then a bigger butterfly flits through the garden.

As you will see the warm weather has bought out many animals including a few reptiles. So let’s get into what I found in September.

One of my favourite September songs for you to scroll to

I put together the photos and thought that I would start with a sunrise. I don’t see much coloured sky living in the bush but sometimes the colours get above the trees. After looking back I now realise that this is really a sunset. Oh well the pastel colours above the blazing reds and oranges looked great.

Here is a lone butterfly photo drinking from a Lavender flower.

My bestie has started a new garden bed and is slowly adding soil, mulch, compost and plants. The Poppies are the best flowering for a while.

Remember last month when I was able to photograph the Gymea Lily that was still in bud? Well the flower was still around when I finally was able to get there after Covid lock downs. The flower is just starting to fade.

This is the first flowering of the Pink Trumpet Tree, an Australian rainforest tree, and now the tree is covered in flowers after a bit of a false start in August.

The Bottlebrush are also having the best flowering for years.

I thought that I had lost the Champagne Pink Bottlebrush but it was just slow to flower.

I love the grass seed heads and flowers, so do the bees.

and the Galahs do as well

The Blue-faced Honeyeaters have taken over the garden making sure that no one else gets into the various grevillea flowers. Always keeping watch as you have a snack, even upside down.

The Paperbark trees are flowering as well much to the delight of the Scarlet Honeyeaters.

The Satin Bowerbird was always in the garden as he set up the bower to attract the females. He didn’t scare off easily much to the vocal displeasure of the Blue-faced Honeyeaters.

Here is the contents of his bower. This is the fifth bower he has constructed in the garden carting most of his treasures from place to place. This site is one of the same places he used last year. What can you see?

Here’s a closer look. I have no idea where he collects his treasures from as none of the contents are from my place, except the snail shells possibly. I don’t know whose blue feathers they are either.

I love the Spangled Drongos shape outlined against the morning sky.

The Yellow-faced Honeyeaters mad a nest just outside of the sun room. The nest was well concealed and I had to wait until the babies were out of the nest to have a look at them.

There is always someone looking in the office window to see if I have any snacks. This is a female King Parrot and is Tiny’s mate.

and this is Tiny trying to get my attention.

We went for a drive and on the way home we stopped off at a wetland towards my besties place. In one part of the wetland, two Black-necked Storks were standing around. Here is a back and front photo of them, possibly a male and female.

On the other side some Australian Pelicans were settling down for the night.

Over the month sometimes the sky looked rather spectacular. I love clouds. These were at my place

These were at my besties

With the warm sunshine starting, the Water Dragons were around sunning themselves.

I had to chase this Goanna from the front of the house. I think he wanted to come inside.

A Carpet Snake was sunning himself on the warm gravel of the driveway until I came outside and he headed off. I think he spent most of the winter in the roof space of my house as I heard shuffling every now and then.

OK I know how much some of you have just sped by the reptiles so here is a bit of cute. A Red-necked Wallaby Joey just hanging in the garden, warming in the morning sun.

Even if you think you are a big boy, Mum always knows you need a good wash. Despite some protests, the face washing went on for a while.

One day we went to Ballina just to get out of the house after the Covid seven day lock down had finished. By the afternoon the sky looked ominous and the seas were quite rough.

It must have been a bumper season and the pink marshmallows are stacked and ready

OK it’s time to head off into the sunset. Thanks for stopping by. I hope you found a favourite or two.

Also for the Changing Seasons which I am co-hosting with Ju-Lyn. Here is Ju-Lyn’s Changing Seasons


Also for Cee’s Mid-week Madness Challenge September: Autumn or Spring
and Terri’s Sunday Stills: #Signs of…. Autumn? Spring?

This is August 2021

Welcome to Changing Seasons for August 2021. Ju_Lyn at Touring My Backyard has already posted her changing season and I am a bit late for the southern hemisphere but may just squeak in for you northerners. It’s never too late for you to post your Changing Seasons and we would love to see what happened in your part of the world.

Here we are again in Spring saying goodbye to Winter. It really wasn’t a Winter as a lot of last month the day time temperatures were in the low 20C although the fire was lit at night as the temperatures went down to single figures 1 to 4C. A lot of the photos are from home as we went into a statewide lockdown mid August and am still there for another week. Lockdowns’ downside is I can’t get to see my bestie and travel around to different places sampling cafes and the shops and of course taking photos.

Lets get going with a tune to scroll to

The last time we were able to get around in Lismore taking Teddy for a walk along the riverbank and through the park, I took quite a number of photos some that have already been used in posts. This is looking along the rock wall which is also part of the levee system.

Can you find the cat among the moss or what can you see? This was a find by my bestie.

I love this stand of Fig Trees helping to hold the riverbank together.

I love this old sign on the Bowling Clubs flower bed. At the time there weren’t any flowers.

First up is a few flowers. I have another lot of flowers which will be another post once one flowering bud opens but it is taking its time. The Sydney Rock Orchid, Dendrobium Speciosum, flowered this year. Even the buds looked good.

When the flowers opened it was a mass of white cascading down from the top of the plant.

The flowers looked best in the afternoon light. Such a delicate flower from the leather hard leaves of the plant.

Late in the day, the sunset made the red Grevilleas really stand out.

This is the only close photo I have of the Gymea Lily at my besties place. It takes a while for such a big flower to open and I couldn’t get back to see the open flower. The flower is on top of a three metre spike.

The Iris have flowered already and these are the first ones to open.

I have Sweet Pittosporum trees in most of the gardens around the house. They flowered about a week ago and the fragrance throughout the house in the early morning and late afternoon is heavenly. This also shows the wonderful blue skies that were in August.

The Pittosporum flowers are full of bees and butterflies and the bee buzz outside is constant. Even the little Stingless Native Bees were onto the flowers. A rear view of this bee shows how much pollen he has in his pollen sacs on his rear legs. They are the yellow dots, one under his body and the other just to the left.

I followed this Orange Ringlet around the tree for a while.

Growing out of the mulch on a sheet of lichen a little cap popped up. I still have it on the bricks waiting to see if anything happens.

The Bottlebrush have been flowering non-stop for quite a while and the birds just love the flowers. A bit of contorting for the Yellow-faced Honeyeater.

An Eastern Spinebill had to reach to get the best spot

The Scarlet Honeyeaters have been in the Bottlebrush all day for weeks now. A Female Scarlet Honeyeater looks to see which flower would taste the best next.

The male Scarlet Honeyeaters are so hard to find among the red flowers. The other day I counted five having afternoon snacks, even if you have to do it upside down.

The Noisy Friarbirds have taken over the front garden and the Honey Gem Grevillea in particular giving anyone the evil eye if they dare come near the flowers.

Taken from my office through the glass door, I saw a bird land in the Ivanhoe Bottlebrush, which has flowered for the first time, and saw a bird I have never seen in the garden before. Unfortunately it was a quick visit as my movement inside was spotted and the Little Wattlebird flew off. Maybe it will come back today if the Friarbirds don’t scare it away.

The Firesticks Grevillea is a hit with some of the smaller honeyeaters. The Lewins Honeyeaters especially like snacking over there.

I wondered why some of the Honey Gem flowers looked a bit scrapy. The King Parrots like to remove the styles, have a bit of a munch and drop to the ground…….repeat as necessary.

I have quite a number of Laughing Kookaburras in the garden at the moment. There is always one of the five keeping a lookout for food to appear among the plants.

These three Laughing Kookaburras are at my besties place in the tree in the paddock next door late one afternoon, giving the perfect silhouette.

We went to a park in Bangalow for my besties birthday party with family. This Brush Turkey patrolled the grounds in case picnickers had any leftovers.

One day on my way home from town, I decided to take a drive along one of the roads near my place I hadn’t been down for years, just to sticky beak. I saw something run across the road so of course I had to get the camera out and found an Australasian Pipit running in the paddock.

It wasn’t the Olympics but I did see some Synchronised Swimming.

At the same wetland as the ducks diving for food, there is a few Comb-crested Jacanas, one of my favourite water birds. They have very long toes which lets the appear to be walking on water as they get about on the water plants.

It is a pity I can’t get closer to this little wetland patch in a paddock. All the photos have to be taken from the road. It has a lot of variety of birds, these are just a few – a Jacana in front, Pacific Black Ducks in the water and a Straw-necked Ibis.

On one of the last days we could get out we went to the beach at Ballina, had some fish and chips while watching out for any Humpback Whales still passing through and watching the Crested Terns dive into the water as there must have been a shoal of fish.

“Get my good side” the Silver Gull seemed to say as he kept turning this way and that.

Well we’re at the end of another Changing Season. Thought I would end with another cow walking into the sunset to say see you next month.

“What are you still doing here?” “Are you going to say which photo was your favourite?” Drop me a line in the comments

Bye

Roundup

Re-living the Past #5 – the first macros – flower and insect edition

Cee’s Midweek Madness Challenge: Close up or Macro

A Stingless Native Bee on a Murraya flower with an ant looking on – April 2013

My first Stingless Native Bee flying. This little one, 10mm in size, flying past a Hibiscus – April 2013

A Native flower on my place – July 2014

A Torenia flower, getting right in there – Oct 2014

The Hippeastrum flower showing the anthers – October 2014

Another Native flower on my place – July 2014

Inside the red Nasturtium flower – October 2014

This is June 2021

Here we are at the half way point of the year. June has been one of rain and dry, Winter arriving and the night temperatures dropping into single figures but the days here were 20 – 24C Just lovely when it wasn’t raining, well that was more like drizzle which was annoying but the garden loved it.

The worse part of June was the number of mice I had at my place. I probably caught between at least two to five mice every night. It was no where near the plague that was west of the mountains but I needed a mouse trap that would get more than one at a time as conventional mouse traps do. I made a couple of traps. One was using a small kitchen tidy bin with a ramp and peanut butter on the lid. The mice just dropped into water in the bottom and drowned. The first trap I made took several variations before success. It is a bottle and a bucket. I had to also make it possum proof as they licked all the peanut butter off the bottle. The mice walk on the bottle to get the peanut butter, the bottle spins and in they go. Here is a result after the first night of model number three. Look away if you may be a bit aghast at viewing dead mice.

I did manage to get out and about a bit. I went to a State Landcare meeting in Dubbo which meant an eight hour drive with the Clarence Landcare Coordinator Debbie driving us in her seven seater van. Debbie and I stayed in an Airbnb with two other women coordinators from up in the Border Ranges. I managed to get out and walk about while the women did a bit of work. The benefit of being a Committee member. Enough of me walking around. Later on I’ll show a few photo I took.

Here is your song to scroll to while you have a look at what I found in June.

One of our favourite places to get to is the Mallanganee Lookout situated on the peak of the Richmond Range. Over the mountains in front is Queensland and to the right looks towards the coast. It was a sometimes rough drive on the Hogarth Range Road, an unsealed road, to get there.

The railway line that goes through Dubbo has interesting infrastructure. It is in a grain growing region and flour mills are right beside the railway tracks.

I loved this iron bridge over the Macquarie River. The grain trains wagons must bump a bit as the train goes over this part of the track as the Sulpher-crested Cockatoos, Pigeons and Sparrows enjoyed a meal

This is one of the iconic Australian trains I saw at Casino on my way to my besties, the Southern Aurora. I used to watch this train as a kid go through the station where I grew up. The rear carriage used to have a neon sign, a copy from thnsw.cpm.au is below

I love the lettering on the carriage

I really liked this door hinge on a church in Dubbo

Here are a few flowers I found. This is a Forest Boronia which grows quite well on my youngest daughters property. I will have to get a cutting and see if I can grow it here in my garden.

Not sure what this quite small flower is, also on my youngest daughters property. It has such an interesting shape.

She also has lots of Banksia trees on her property. I love the flowers, Another one I will get from her for my garden.

On the way home, I go on the back roads as it is much shorter, I often stop in at the Ospreys nest to check to see what’s happening. I am always pleased to see the tree is still standing and the nest is OK. Don’t they have a great spot? The Osprey in the background is on a tree overlooking the Clarence River hoping for a fish to swim past.

A Grey Butcherbird surveys my besties garden for a snack…..

……or perhaps it is watching what the Scaly-breasted Lorikeet is up to in the Bottlebrush.

One morning, in my garden, several Crimson Rosellas paid a visit to the Yamba Sunshine Grevillea.

The Gum Nuts from a Eucalypt tree in my besties garden

Her Cumquat tree only planted less than three years ago is laden with fruit. Yesterday she made some Cumquat Marmalade which I hope to taste this weekend.

A young Variegated Fairy Wren regarded me with suspicion before flying off to join the others in the safety of the bushes nearby.

At Mallanganee Lookout we could hear birds and this female Golden Whistler came to see what we were doing.

On a drive round the Clarence Valley, when I saw the Wren, I also came across an Intermediate Egret stalking the shallows.

It has been good to see that the White-winged Choughs have returned to my place. Most afternoons the big troop of twelve wander through my garden bickering over tasty morsels they find. They are interesting birds. They have a tendency to steal other members of family groups to enhance their own. They are one of only two surviving members of the Australian mud-nest builders family, Corcoracidae, and is the only member of the genus Corcorax.

The noisy squawks of Sulpher-crested Cockatoos are unmistakable as they fly overhead.

I love the look and smell of the Lavender flowers in my besties garden.

These are the last of the Roses which had a great flowering this year The red….

…and the pretty pink

This is a wonderful Bottlebrush, Champagne Pink.

The basil flowers are amazing and the bees love them.

Just like Lions Tails, the bees just are in most of the flowers.

On the way to Dubbo, we had to stop in at the Raspberry Lookout so could show Debbie my favourite place. The mist in the valley looked so good.

The yellow Common or Variable Billy Button flowers were everywhere at Raspberry Lookout. Isn’t Billy Buttons a great name? They are between 10 and 25mm in diameter.

I found a Dwarf Eastern Tree Frog asleep under the eaves

The cows on a dairy, not far from the one I usually photograph next door to my besties place, were heading to the milking shed in an orderly line.

It is getting late. An Ibis is heading to its roost to the west as the sunset is in an orange phase.

Later on the sunset turned a lovely red reflected in the Egrets wings as it headed to the East to its roost.

It was a magnificent sunset. So that’s all for June I hope you enjoyed you wander through my June. Did you have a favourite photo?

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Also for Changing Seasons
Changing Season is now co-hosted by Ju-Lyn from Touring My Backyard and myself, who will be your Changing Seasons host for July. Thanks to Su at Zimmerbitch for doing an outstanding job and letting us take over.

This is May 2021

I wonder where May went. I seem to have spent a bit of time at home doing a bit of gardening, trying to get on with shed projects and doing things at my besties place. We went for drives every weekend to various places enjoying the wonderful Autumn weather we have here on the North Coast. Every day was in the low to mid 20’sC and mostly sunny.

Your May song to listen to as you scroll having a look at what my May was like in photos. There is another song break further along as well.

It’s Autumn and some trees are starting to colour, mainly exotic trees such as this Maple in the sunset

Nature likes to reclaim its place. A fig making itself at home among the brick work.

One day the little fig might grow to be like this wonderful specimen growing in Grafton, Aren’t the roots shapes wonderful?

The Fig tree had a face

Speaking of shapes, this fence and hedge in Grafton have always made me wonder about the skill of the hedger.

While on the walkabout in Grafton I went around the back of a church and found the old bell which used to be in the bell tower on the ground. I love the mossy green and patina.

The moss on another church in Grafton gave the bricks a bit of character.

As did the moss and lichen on the church roof

I love the green colour on this old trunk

A bit of fun I found in a town called Mallanganee on the way to Tenterfield

A bit about the following photos in song

The old building is a museum to George Woolnough and the world of a saddler. Unfortunately it was shut when I was there.

Peter Allens shoes and maracas in the window

You may have read about the mouse plague in Australia. I don’t have a lot but catch between one and seven a night. I made this one to put in the pantry when I am away as I don’t want to come home to mice in the other traps. It works OK and have caught a few. This was the test run photo.

I managed to catch one in the shed. they go up the “ramp” to the peanut butter, the swing top tidy flips them into the water in the bottom.

Enough of the gruesome. The Lilli Pilli trees have flowered and the fruits are setting.

Some flowering Eucalypts are having their last go before Winter

The Nodding Violets have been flowering non stop all year.

This is the Grevillea that is a rescue plant which flowered for the first time this year. I posted a close up of the flower for Cee’s FOTD a week or so ago.

One day trip was to Shannon Creek Dam. There is a short, 1.5km, walk where the senses were suddenly assailed by a sweet honey smell. A few small trees covered in tiny white flowers were amazing to see.

I did a bit of a drive around the lower Clarence Valley mainly to find a few birds and other things for the various photo challenges. In a town, Maclean, I came across some gardens with some lovely Autumn flowers like this Tibouchina Perhaps it is purple enough for Judes Life in Colour

I was going to put this one in as well but I didn’t think it purple enough

The Banksias have almost finished flowering for the year. Here is the one on the right almost gone and the one under the yellow flower has opened its little mouth like seed pods.

There are many Australian flowers that are tubular with long protruding styles arranged in cylindrical spikes like the Banksia above and this Bottlebrush which the Eastern Spinebills find quite delicious. (Photographed from my verandah)

One morning, the Bar-shouldered Doves had a meeting at the water bowl to discuss what to do for the day.

The pigeons practiced social distancing on the church roof in Grafton.

I was quite pleased to discover that the Magpie Geese hadn’t left the small wetland in Grafton to migrate north for the Winter

Just off the Highway near Grafton I saw a Black Swan. I stopped the car and walked back only to be given the stink-eye. He wasn’t pleased to see me as I was to see him.

The Brown Honeyeater was looking about for a snack

In Tenterfield about five Eastern Rosellas landed in the pine trees in the afternoon. Perhaps they roost there at night. I was being ignored by this one.

The Yellow-faced Honeyeaters were the dominant birds in the garden chasing the other Honeyeaters out until the Blue-faced Honeyeaters turned up a few days ago.

I went to a Landcare site in Tyndale. I was at the official opening of the site with the other organisations who sponsored or supplied labour about twelve years ago and wanted to see how the work had progressed. Unfortunately the ground was quite boggy so I didn’t get to walk around but did hear a White-headed Pigeon in the tree above me.

At Lawrence I stopped at a wetland where there were a few birds resting except the White-faced Heron who was wandering about looking for dinner.

One afternoon on my way home, I made a detour through Waterview Heights and was surprised to see the small dam still had a large flock of Plumed Whistling Ducks, many of whom were sleeping but a few were on guard duty

Most of the month the songs of the Golden Whistlers could be heard. A curious female Golden Whistler watched as I was in the garden.

Another installment of “Why I can’t have nice things” The King Parrots don’t mind coming onto the verandah and having a snack on the plants in the hanging pots.

Nearly every morning an Eastern Yellow Robin lands in the tree in the garden and inspects the garden for something to eat. This photograph is from my office while sitting in the chair at the computer.

Usually in May lovely little Rose Robins visit my garden. This year I could hear them but didn’t see them except this young one or a female who sat long enough for me to grab a quick photo.

I guess you are a bit weary, so lets head off into the sunset.

This photo was taken about thirty minutes after the one above. Another Purple for Jude?

I almost forgot about the Blood Moon. Managed to get a few OK photos though.

Thanks for getting to the end. Did you have a favourite photo? See you next month.

Also for Su’s The Changing Seasons May 2021
Cee’s FOTD
Life in Colour May: Purple

A favourite bit purple

Life in Colour May: Purple

Jude want’s to know “What’s your favourite purple Picture?” Perhaps this one? A Blue-banded Bee in a Blue Ginger flower. Blue Ginger flowers vary in colour from a blue to a deep purple depending on the amount of sunlight, soils etc.

Purple around my place #1

Life in Colour May: Purple

Jude has asked “What purples can you find in Nature?” I have a few native plants and flowers around my place that are purple. It is hard to capture the purple of the flowers in some of the flowers. Most of these flowers are between 10 and 18mm in diameter. Unfortunately I don’t know the names of some of these.

I am saving a lot of purples for later in the month so come back every now and then and see what else I can find.