The birds of June

It may be Winter, but here, it is the time when birds drop in on their way north to build their strength for the next part of their journey, or stay for the winter in the warm days on the North Coast. The nights can get cold but the days are usually in the low 20’s C with the warmth of sunshine and the number of plants that flower in late Autumn and Winter makes it a good place to stop off. This is not a complete record of birds as there have been birds who I haven’t managed to get in my lens plus there has been some who have just been to fast for me to photograph. Yes I have quite a number of photos of empty branches!!!

This first gallery of photos are the birds from my place.

The White-throated Honeyeaters arrive in the morning and in the afternoon with their chirp chirp chirp as they set about diving into the birdbath or pool to have their bath.
white throated honeyeater_named_home_june 2017

The Yellow-faced Honeyeaters arrive from down south, some stay while others in the flock fly further north.
yellow faced honeyeater_named_home_june 2017

The Blue-faced Honeyeaters come and go all year depending on what food is available. The Honey Gem Grevillea has finally started to flower after a long dry hot Summer. Look at the pollen dust on his head.
blue faced honeyeater_named_home_june 2017

The little Eastern Spinebills are here with the distinctive clicking of their wings as they zip around the garden and their calls echoing in the gullies.
eastern spinebill_named_home_june 2017

You can judge their size by comparing with the Blue-faced Honeyeater and Grevillea flower above. They really stretch to reach the blossoms at times.
eastern spinebill_named_home_june 2017 (2)

Their plumage is quite pretty don’t you think?
eastern spinebill_honey gem_named_home_june 2017

I don’t include many photos of the female Golden Whistler but this one is so cute. They are around the place all year round with their repetitive call which can sound like a squeaky wheel, at times up to twenty single notes.
eastern yellow robin_named_home_june2017
They also like to land on the side of trees and have a look around.eastern yellow robin_named_home_june 2017

As do the White-throated Treecreepers who just hop up and down the trees looking for insects under the bark. They have a similar call to the Yellow Robins but not as persistent.
white throated treecreeper_named_home_june 2017

They also like to defy gravity as the give the trees a very thorough checking over.
white treecreeper_hanging_named_home_june 2017
The tiny Red-backed Fairy Wrens like to explore the lower parts of the forest eating grass seeds and insects foraging among the grass stalks. The Jenny Wren has good camouflage.  wren_named_home_june 2017

The Silvereyes are migrants who stop for a few weeks to gather their strength for their next leg of their journey north.
silvereye01_named_home_june 2017

They are another of the tiny birds around here.
silvereye02_pink bloodwood nuts_named_home_june 2017

The Red-browed Firetails are another constant visitor to the bush as they move about in small flocks looking for grass seeds. This is a young one as the red brow isn’t as prominent as the adults.
red browed finch01_named_home_june 2017

The tiny Striated Thornbills are always around the garden and in the gullies around the house.
striated thornbill01_named_home 2017

They love the birdbath.
striated thornbill02_named_home_june 2017

Someone who I haven’t seen for quite a while has turned up this month and has been around the garden early in the morning and in the gullies during the day. The Spotted Pardalote digs a tunnel in the side of the gully to make it’s nest. They are so pretty aren’t they?
spotted pardelote02_named_home_june 2017

I think this one saw me as I snuck along the verandah for a better photo.
spotted pardelote01_named_home_june 2017

They can be quite vocal too.
spotted pardalote_named_home_june 2017

The sounds of Kookaburras signal the start and end of every day. There are about three families that live in the bush around the house and sometimes the cacophony of up to five or six Kookaburras can be quite deafening.
kookaburras02_named_home_june 2017

After I took this photo I noticed that there was another two sitting nearby in separate trees. All of a sudden they all flew off into the forest disappearing among the trees.
kookaburras01_named_home_june 2017

This next gallery are from my besties place.

The Lewins Honeyeater is the boss of my besties garden. They swoop on most other birds that dares to come into the garden. The Lewins at my place aren’t as bossy.
lewins honeyeater_named_binna burra_june 2017

Can you spot the Varied Triller?
varied triller_named_binna burra_june 2017

The Grey Fantails are always doing their acrobatic flying around the place catching insects on the wing. A very serious looking bird.
grey fantail_named_binna burra_june 2017

The Golden Whistler is always around the garden and nearby rainforest singing its lovely song.
golden whistler_named_binna burra_june 2017

My besties place is surrounded by rainforest so she has more doves and pigeons than I do at my place. The White-headed Pigeon has a deep sounding whoomp whoomp call. They also fly about in large flocks.
white headed pigeon_named_binna burra_june 2017

The Brown Pigeon didn’t want its photo taken.
brown pigeon_named_binna burra_june 2017

There is always up to ten bar-shouldered Doves foraging on the ground in the garden looking for pecans that have fallen from the tree.
bar shouldered dove_named_binna burra_june 2017

The Whipbirds also enjoy foraging among the leaves for pecans.
whipbird_pecan_named_binna burra_june 2017

While high in the trees the Figbirds look for seeds as well as pecans. This female Figbird found the seeds of an Umbrella Tree.
fig bird_female_named_binna burra_june 2017

The male Figbird was more interested in pecans.
figbird_male_named_home_june 2017

The Green Catbird is also interested in pecans. Not long after this photo was taken, so was the pecan.
catbird_pecan_named_binna burra_june 2017

Another recipient of the fallen pecans is the large Brush Turkey. His strong beak breaks open the pecans and often leaves small pieces behind for the other birds to eat. This one we call Brendan who has taken over the garden and has a mound nest almost one meter tall in the front garden. One day I’ll try to get a photo of Brendan and his mound.
brush turkey_named_binna burra_june 2017

The most exciting discovery was finding a Regent Bowerbird just on the edge of the garden late one afternoon. I only managed to get a couple of bad photos but had to share in my excitement.
regent bowerbird_named_binna burra_june 2017

We went to Byron Bay one day to shop as we haven’t been for ages and Winter is a good time as the number of tourists is halved at least. The Golden Pendas are in flower and the Rainbow Lorikeets were having a great time screeching at each other.
rainbow lorikeet_named_home_june 2017

And of course there are always chooks foraging around both our gardens.
chook_named_home_june 2017

That is a snapshot of some of the birds around here in June. My June photo round-up probably won’t have any birds this year. Hopefully I’ll get to that by next week.

 

21 thoughts on “The birds of June

  1. A wonderful collection of shots, Brian! My garden is silent these days since the cats have arrived but I’m glad yours is so alive with birds. It’s exciting when winter comes up here and I start seeing migratory birds on my walks at White Rock. So many of the native trees and shrubs are flowering now too. Thanks for sharing your fabulous nature photo essays. I hope the birds will still be around when I eventually make it down that way. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ve seen this post before, but I can’t see my comment on it. Hope that life is not too busy for you now, B, but if it is I hope it will soon stop being too busy and that you will return to bird photography. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have had so much to do. I have to do my June thing. I haven’t taken many photos this month. I cannot stop finding birds. I’ll see if I can find your comment. I have had some comments from people I write with go into my spam for some weird reason 😦

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It’s possible that I was doing it on my Android and that it never went through. WordPress has been giving me headaches lately with their upgrades and improvements.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I have had a good look but there wasn’t anything from you Paula. I had 58 spam comments!!! I don’t look in there as often as I should. I hope I can get to my next blog tomorrow and then some photo challenges 😀 Thanks for stopping by. I like chatting with you

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Lovely shots – you and your best friend obviously have terrific bird gardens! I love how winter can be a time of such great bird activity. I have a few corrections for you. The first bird is a White-naped, not White-throated Honeyeater (which would have bluish, not red skin over the eye). The one you’ve labelled female Eastern Yellow Robin is actually a female Golden Whistler. (Female Yellow Robins look the same as the males.) I don’t think the fairy-wren is a Variegated; looks more like a Red-backed to me by the pinkish bill and lack of eye markings. The Red-browed Finch is definitely a young one judging by the almost lack of red brow, and the bill is still partly black. The male and female differences are much more subtle. And finally, the Thornbill is Brown, not Striated (note eye colour, forehead markings). I hope this helps!
    Cheers, Carol

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Carol. I haven’t seen Red-backed Wrens here for quite a number of years so that is exciting. The Golden Whistlers have been here for a few months now so maybe they are setting up home. I will have to go through my Honeyeaters again….oh dear there are so many that look similar. Have a fab weekend. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Taking my breath away… How did you manage to capture these many beautiful birds?!
    Hope they will come to Texas. 🙂
    Thank you for the beautiful gallery, Brian!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Amy 😀 some photos were taken though the glass door from my desk others from sitting in the bush waiting for the birds to come or stalking around the bush. I have recorded nearly 100 birds at my place

      Liked by 1 person

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