A mixture of many things

So much has happened since my last blog. I am no longer employed and have time to try to sort out my photos and other stuff. I am not able to do all that much as my hips are hurting a bit especially when I bend down. It’s quite amazing to discover how clumsy I am, I seem to drop so many things which leads me into decision-making. Do I leave whatever I have dropped there or do I really need to pick it up!!!

Enough of that and onto some of the wonders in nature I have come across as well as other things that I have thought was a bit special and hope you do too.

The succulent that is growing among the rocks in the garden, possibly dropped there and started to make a home for itself, has flowered. So many tiny flowers that only were around for a couple of weeks but added a drop of colour in the garden.

succulant flower_named_home_july 2016

The Grevillea, Yamba Gold is flowering for the first time. The rains in July were a life saver for the garden which had a flush of life.

grevillia_yamba gold_named_home_july 2016

I gave the nectarine tree a severe trimming and this year it has been covered in blossoms.

nectarine tree_named_home_july 2016

The bees have been visiting the tree. The buzzing, as I walked about, was very loud.

bee_nectarine blossoms_named_home_july 2016

The Stingless Native Bees have also discovered the tree.

native bee_blossom_named_home_july 2016

Both bees decided to visit the same flower at the same time. It looks like a face off doesn’t it?

bees_nectarine blossom_named_home_july 2016

I love finding a Praying Mantis slowly swaying as it makes its way around the garden. Just after this photo, it decided to jump onto the camera and wander about. The photos of the Praying Mantis on the lens didn’t come out as good as I thought they would.

praying mantis_named_binna burra_july 2016

One evening in July, it was rather warm so I had windows open and in flew a fly. The fly just buzzed around me while I was trying to do stuff!!!

fly_named_home_july 2016

We had a few days away and while we were sitting outside enjoying the late afternoon and the sunset, this cloud caught my eye. I immediately thought it was Micky Mouse. What do you think?

micky mouse cloud_tweed_named_july 2016

All of a sudden there was a loud flapping of wings and the Brush Turkeys headed to their roost high in the Norfolk Island Pine.

brush turkeys_roost_named_tweed_july 2016

The Eastern Spinebill hung around the garden all through the dry period and took over ownership of my favourite Honey Gem Grevillea. They did allow the Silvereyes to enjoy the flowers as well. The Silvereyes dropped in on their way north as they usually do in July.

eastern spinebill_silvereye_named_home_july 2016

The Silvereyes stayed around for a week or so before going on their way. Such a pretty little bird.

silver eye_named_home_july 2016

Late one afternoon the light was just amazing. It changed the whole colour of the Honey Gem making the greens so vivid.

eastern spinebill_named_home_july 2016

There was a bit of competition at my besties bird bath. The birds have a bit of a bath or a drink.

thornbills_named_binna burra_july 2016

Early one morning the Little Wattlebird Olive-backed Oriole (thanks for the ID @carolprobets ) wondered if the water was too cold to have a bath.

little wattlebird_named_binna burra_july 2016

I went onto the verandah and there was a flurry of activity as around 20 Red-browed Finches flew out of a patch of long grass where they were feeding on the seed heads. Some flew into the trees whereas others just popped onto the garden edges to watch what I was doing.

red browed finch_named_home_jul;y 2016

The palm frond made a good perch to wait until I went away so they could continue with their seed eating.

red browed finch_palm_named_home_jul;y 2016

The Wrens make a splash of colour as the hop about the garden looking for things to eat.

superb fairy wren_named_binna burra_july 2016

Down at the beach I am always on the look out for birds of prey in the sky. This time the White-bellied Sea Eagle Brahminy Kite (thanks for the ID @carolprobets )soared high in the sky, occasionally dropping lower to investigate a possible meal.

white bellied sea eagle_named_lennox head_july 2016

The unseasonal rainfall and warm weather produced so many fungi. The tiny orange fungi were all through the leaf litter.

fungi_tiny_named_home_july 2016

These dimpled fungi pushed their way out of the soil in the morning sun.

fungi01_named_home_july 2016

I found this silver looking fungi under the tank stand. The red centre looked a lot redder than the photo shows.

fungi_white_named_home_july 2016

These larger orange fungi were scattered in small clear patches throughout the bush.

fungi_gold_named_home_july 2016

Now come the tale of woe. During the few days I spent away enjoying myself at the resort in Kingscliffe, mayhem was happening at home. I came home to find that all of my chooks had been killed by a dog or perhaps two. I was devastated. There were four dead chooks in the chook house, a few piles of feathers in the bush and one pile of feathers on the road about 60 meters from the chook yard. When I saw those feathers on the road as I drove home, I had a sinking feeling. Speaking to some neighbours, I found out that three properties had some of their chooks killed as well. Apparently there had been a stray dog spotted around the neighbourhood.

Here is my rooster who was giving me the stink-eye for disturbing the foraging among the food scraps I just threw down. The six brown hens had only been here for about three weeks. These were the first hens I had ever purchased and they were just settling into the chook yard routine. One hen had just started to lay as well.

rooster_named_home_july 2016chooks_gangofsix_named_july 2016

Sorry to end on such a sad note. I love my chooks and now I am sure the dog has gone, I’ll have to get some more chooks.

7 thoughts on “A mixture of many things

  1. That’s a rough old patch you have been through. Watch out for that dog, once they have had a taste, they come back for more (memories from childhood, only it was sheep).

    Liked by 1 person

  2. As always, a terrific story and photos, but sorry to hear about your chooks. Must have been an awful shock to arrive home to. A couple of bird corrections for you: the Little Wattlebird is an Olive-backed Oriole, and the Sea-eagle is a Brahminy Kite. Love reading about the visitors to your garden and that wonderful birdbath!
    Carol

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Carol!!! The Little Wattlebirds are such a constant visitor plus their calls can be heard most of the day. It will add to the wonderful bird bath list of vistors. I am still learning about birds and what I see. My list of birds at my place has grown to 102 thanks to Greg Clancey who has been listening to my recordings of bird calls at my place. You are a treasure for helping me. x

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Brian, as usual a wonderful selection of shots! You have so much wildlife where you live. I am a little jealous actually. I’m not jealous of your aching bones/joints though. I’m sorry you are having pain. I’m also very sorry about your lovely chooks. It’s easy to get attached to them when you see them every day. I know I got attached to mine.Thanks so much for sharing all the beautiful and interesting things you see, Brian. x

    Liked by 1 person

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